Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 19, 2018, 02:42:35 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 54 55 [56] 57 58
  Print  
Author Topic: Poetry  (Read 10652 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
Lhoffman
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1989


View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #825 on: May 31, 2008, 11:32:59 AM »

Enjoyed BOTDRF with Stein's skewing of the traditional genre.  But it went deeper than that.  Instead of directly addressing crime and answering questions, Stein answered the broader question of human nature....This is why people in the country shut their doors. 

Her reiteration of the Lizzie theme rose to a poetic dimension, and gave it a broader scope as well.  Her addition of Edith to the final statement was quite powerful.

But what do you make of the idea of re-writes and editing?  Herbert Gill implies that she didn't edit (explanation of "a piano") while Retallack says she does.  Stein herself said she thought and wrote at the same time, with little editing.  But then Stein often seems to change her mind.

On "everybody" and "no one"....Stein uses Everybody to mean herself; does No One every mean anyone specific? or just anyone but Stein?
Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #826 on: May 31, 2008, 11:11:45 PM »




Stein herself said she thought and wrote
at the same time, with little editing... 


That's the way I write...

I can embrace only so much lit crit.

And then I've got to extend it onto the page.

"Embrace & extend," as my Master says...

Letting the Shadow of the Day...

Embrace me & extend me into the world of grey...

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,190.msg93160.html#msg93160

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,190.msg93161.html#msg93161


Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #827 on: June 01, 2008, 06:07:06 AM »

And.....I just discovered that Retallack essay is available on Questia. 

http://books.google.com/books?id=LG4Z-NJd44AC&pg=PA145&lpg=PA145&dq=retallack+stein+blood+dining&source=web&ots=dLhfnEEi21&sig=y39wRddVRanm9wpahYcG4UecKbQ&hl=en

See Google online Retallack's essay on Stein’s meta-mystery BOTDRF.

Interesting essay for all whodunit fans. 
Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1989


View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #828 on: June 06, 2008, 01:27:24 AM »

Gone

We should have had an inkling
when the geese refused to fly.
Saturdays we’d trudge through newfell snow,
we'd skate across the frozen lake
listening in the distance for the sound of
plaintive cries and the sense of
shadow overheard.

October November
on into December
they cried until the solstice
and an early morning call,
they cried until a cold voice.
We spent the day in bed
hiding under quilts and covers.
We spent the day in silence
because if you don’t say,
it isn’t so.

Next day we struggled into
worn flannels boots and down
We trudged through a field
of untouched snow
stepped out onto the lake,
ears accosted by an empty wind
accompanied only by the sound
of silence.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2008, 03:49:05 AM by Lhoffman » Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #829 on: June 09, 2008, 04:26:38 AM »



The Making of Gay Americans

“This is then complete
disillusionment in living—
The complete realization
That no one can believe
As you do about anything.”
—Gertrude Stein
The Making of Americans

You’ve been living with this “idea”—you’ve been feeling it a long time now—you’ve lived inside it for many years & it’s lived deep inside you—you’ve been thru it & around it & above & below it—this “idea” that you’re a gay American—

You’ve been feeling this idea of being a gay American for a long time now—the older you get the more articulate this idea becomes—it’s not just “living thru it”—or “living inside it”—it’s about “talking thru it”—it’s about not playing the same old “don’t ask don’t tell” game anymore with your head—it’s about “free speech” inside your own mind—it’s about New York City—it’s about San Francisco—it’s about LA & Las Vegas—after Stonewall—

Especially after Stonewall—you see Political Correctness is a word-game—PC is a two-way street—there’s GLBTQ queens telling you one thing to do—Straights telling you another—everybody has their own idea about being Gay American—with lots of Political Correctness thrown in for tricks—along with FOXNews & Hollywood—but you write for yourself—yourself & strangers—

How much PC does Whitman go thru—what about Hart Crane even now—dished by The New York Times—for being too fond of young Sailorboys—as if that were any book reviewer’s business—and Gertrude Stein—Exiled to Paris to find her Voice—Exile, my dears, is de rigueur & soup de jour—for Outsiders who want to know themselves—that’s how the making of Gay Americans works—that’s what happens when you’re exiled—living it & writing it & being it—in the outsider moment—

Writing Leaves of Grass, The Bridge & The Making of Americans—it’s not easy being a Gay American writer—even tho you’re busy typing away & doing all the right asking, telling & talking—being a Gay American isn’t easy—being told all the time—what to do & how to think by Straights—it’s hard getting beyond the Orwellian “don’t ask don’t tell” trope—because “mind-speak” has its own Narrative—and it’s been so deeply ingrained in you—the Narrative of the Straight All-American Apple Pie success story—

The Making of Americas inside you—the Making of Americas outside you—no matter who you are or what you’re doing—you’re still down there in the nitty-gritty of the ongoing immediate continuous American Moment—the continuous American present that encompasses us now—the American experience that composes itself—without Explanation or Elucidation—without beginning middle or end—simply starting it—over & over again each day—a rose is rose etc.

Being a Gay American—being a Zit on the American Zeitgeist—being a Zoid amongst Neocon Creepazoids—who needs Romero, Lynch or Ed Wood Jr—when you’ve got “They’re coming to get you Barbara” every day & night—here in the lonely American Night of the Living Dead—or maybe you’re Eraserhead—coming back from work each day—each day another Plan Nine from Outer Space???

Reading Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas—writing your own version thru a series of gestalts & synchronicity—calling it The Autobiography of Anybody—embedding yourself in American stream-of-consciousness—like Faulkner did breathing Mississippi in—and breathing Yoknapatawpha out—the map of your own mythic Mississippi inside your brain—New York City—Elba—


« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 07:57:06 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #830 on: June 09, 2008, 05:15:39 AM »



Writing for Gertrude & Alice

“I’m writing for myself—
and strangers”
—Gertrude Stein,
The Making of Americans

Boss Cupid isn’t your icon—you’ve been writing for yourself—you’ve been writing for Alice & Gertrude—because they aren’t strangers—they’re the couple who wrote The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas—knowing what they knew back then—the gay Modernist moment—different than the Male Modernist moment—different than Ezra Pound and Company…

Knowing you’re a Sapphic Modernist like Stein and Toklas—like Djuna Barnes and Mina Loy—like Natalie Barney the Parisian Amazon—back then when Paris was a Woman—with Gertrude writing in the immediate moment—ad lib extemporaneous impromptu stream of Lesbos consciousness—with nobody very much interested in her writing—until The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas gets published—then readers want to know more about Gertrude—and Alice B. Toklas…

Writing like Gertrude Stein did—writing for herself—working alone except for Alice—mostly reading writing knowing talking with guests in her salon—paying attention to Picasso and the French artists—imitating cubist painting with her own work—with you doing the same thing—having conversations with the Chicks-from-Avignon—posing with their Congolese cognoscente masks—but mostly just living each day as it comes—simply repeating the day before—like Matisse with his haystacks & water-lilies—enjoying your different ways—The Making of Gay Americans…

Writing for yourself—you’ve always done it that way—it’s like eating breathing sleeping—it’s a way of being human—Everyday as now—everyday as immediate—everyday inside a time loop—The Making of Gay Americans—happening to you—each & every day in new ways—it’s the Other who’s with you in the now—you feel more gay American in the moment—the moving American moment—everything is Movement—everybody including you—The Making of Americans…

Disillusionment—that’s something that doesn’t just happen out of the blue—knowing you’re alone—even with somebody else—it’s a strange feeling—it creeps up on you—sometimes you don’t even know it’s there—you get so used to it all the time—you get born into it—and pretty soon it’s you—without even a second thought—that’s how The Making of Americans happens—don’t ask don’t tell don’t talk don’t think—but when denouement comes—“too gay” & “so gay” just don’t work anymore—that’s when the clock stops—there’s no turning it back—because time stops—and The Making of Gay Americans begins—that’s how it works with you—when time stops—that’s when your Voice begins…

Feeling blue—there’s nothing new to it—reading Harlem Renaissance writers—like Bruce Nugent & Langston Hughes—Hurston & Van Vechten—what’s it like living in Harlem back then—being young gay Black American writers & poets—writing “Jade, Lilies & Smoke” late at night—the way Bruce Nugent wrote it—lower-case Negro stream-of-consciousness romance—the feeling of gay recognition you get—when you do long riffs of hyphenated-meanderings—when all kinds of feelings happen at once—perfect buzz-romance moments—between a Black & Puerto-Rican kid…

Writing for Gertrude & Alice—feeling thinking doing knowing believing asking talking writing your way—the way gay Americans write themselves into the moment—letting the English language—become the way Americans do it—generations of The Making of Americans—it hasn’t stopped yet & keeps on going—the American Dream of making it rich—getting married—living in the suburbs—having kids—getting old & retiring—living & dying—there on Come Back Little Sheba Street…

And so you write for yourself—for Gertrude & Alice—writing your own rendition of The Making of Americans—writing your own version of The Making of Gay Americans—pouty & pondering like Proust in his cork-lined bedroom—writing alone like Gertrude Stein at night—Gertrude the Modernist Mommy Dearest—Gertrude the Blog of Americans—writing The Making of Americans—writing for herself & strangers—

Alice taking typing lesions—so she can type in the morning—typing what Gertrude wrote long into the night—selling a Cézanne or a Picasso—so Alice can become an editor—publishing Plain Editions—publishing Gertrude when nobody else would—that’s the kind of woman & lover Alice is—loving Gertrude & everything she writes and says and does—wanting to see it in print—even more than Gertrude—that’s the kind of lover to have—one who loves you that much…

You write for yourself—not for strangers or others—even others who know you—the ones you make love to—the boyfriends who ring the doorbell—writing for yourself—in the midnight moment—scribbling down notes—on the backs of envelopes—notebooks & journals—writing it down…

Gradually you understand more & more about yourself—yourself & strangers—what goes into The Making of Gay Americans—you become more the gay American moment—than you were back then—you keep writing for yourself—more & more for yourself and strangers—The Making of Gay Americans—writing your way like other gay Americans—writing their versions of what it’s like to be…

Djuna Barnes writes’ Nightwood, The Book of Repulsive Women & The Woman’s Almanack—Mina Loy writes Lunar Baedecker & futurist manifestoes—Judy Grahn writes Really Reading Gertrude Stein—Queen of Wands, Queen of Swords, Another Mother Tongue & Work of a Common Woman—so many gay men & women—so many ways gays & lesbian poets & writers write—all of them working toward The Making of Gay Americans—living their lives with the conscious feeling of becoming themselves—through generations of lovingly repeating themselves—feeling & accepting it—struggling with it—compelled to it—some with pride & prejudice—others humorously repeating themselves like a broken record—others behind closed doors—hesitantly reluctantly shamefully repeating each day doing what they did…

Some not writing at all—just living it the way it’s always been done—living with a lover—like Gertrude & Alice—the continuous Sapphic Modernist moment—transgressing Straight consciousness—by living in the gay stream of consciousness—which is The Making of Americans…


« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 05:50:26 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #831 on: June 13, 2008, 04:45:02 AM »



Pomo Homo Strato

“I mention Canto XXVI because it was
T.S. Eliot’s favorite bit of the Divine
Commedia becoming a central text in
the genesis of Anglo-American Modernism…
these two modes of speech of Sodomites,
the sensual mode in their private relationships,
and the public shout in the outside world.
We should find similar stratagems in gay
literature, as in Dante, both being used at
once, either alternately or as palimpsest,
as text and subtext, on top of the other.”
—Gregory Woods, “Poetry and Paradox,”
A History of Gay Literature: The Male
Tradition, Yale, 1998.

How art thou fair, Diodorus—
And ripe for love thou art,
Stolen kisses, wary eyes,
Long hair, endless curls
Trained by the devoted
Artistry of a stylist beyond
The precincts of Rome…

Let me count the ways—
The thousand enchantments
You give to me each night:
O sperm, testes, paradidymus!
O scrotum, septum, & rectum!
O penis! o prepuce & urethra!
O prostate gland!

O glans penis, slightly bulging
structure at the distal end of penis!
O Cowper’s glands, secreting slimy
Substance functioning as a lubricant!
O seminal fluids, functioning
Suspending protecting delicate
Spermatozoa during their stay
Within the male body!

O symphysis pubis! tunica albuginea!
Vasa efferentis! corpus cavernosum et
Spongiousum! O ampulla of vas!
O meatus and bulb! O dorsal vein!
O membranous convoluted pouch!

O Dartos muscle! O spermatid
And spermatocyte! inguinal canals!
Seminal vesicles! seminiferous tubules!
Prostatic utricles! efferent ductules!
Testicular lobules! O male seminosities!

O epididymis, tube-like structure
Attaining lengths up to twenty feet!
Boy, at the lovely tip of your
Penis’ urethral orifice, where all
My poetries terminate…


Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #832 on: June 13, 2008, 06:07:00 AM »



Pomo Homo Strato II

“W. H. Auden gives us yet
another version of Symbolist
poetic. “Lakes,” one of the
Bucolics Auden wrote in the
early 50s. Auden’s strategy in
“Lakes” is to assemble a
a set of symbolic properties
and then to deflate the whole
whole symbol-making process.”
—Marjorie Perloff,
The Poetics of Indeterminacy:
Rimbaud to Cage

“Let’s start with Zeus”—
A boy has an average father,
Fucking slowly to pass the day,
And any healthy mother to give
Birth from Michigan to Baikal.

Boys require fiends to keep—
Them on their toes, aggressive
Ill-bred romantics like Strato
Waltzing around rhyming
Insults about ancient Greece.

No wonder Rome fell—
Along with Greece & all those
Decadent Europeans down into
The Bermuda Triangle of the
Shark-infested blue Carib.

Only the wicked & conceited—
Read The Greek Anthology
Tart Venusian Sailorboy
Diodorus jumping overboard
Crummy tramp-steamers
Orizaba filthy-rich Titanic.

The cream of the crop—
Dion, Asclepiades, Theoron, Aretas,
Andiades, Myiscus, Hippomenes…
Just reeling off their names
Is ever so comfy.


Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #833 on: June 13, 2008, 06:47:18 AM »



Pomo Homo Strato III

“Ashbery presents Harding
as a dull man. The put-down
is worth examining in detail,
since it tells us a great deal
about Ashbery’s irony.”
—Gregory Woods, “Poetry and Paradox,”
A History of Gay Literature: The Male
Tradition, Yale, 1998.

Strato invented it—
The word “bloviate” meaning
To spout, to spew aimless verbiage.
He never wanted to be Hadrian’s
Imperial Poet Laureate…

He died in the Palace Hotel—
In San Francisco his lover reading
The Palatine Anthology to him.
Poor Strato wasn’t a bad egg…
He loved boys and Athens…


Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #834 on: June 13, 2008, 08:14:33 AM »



Pomo Homo Strato IV

“Wir kannten nicht sein unerhörtes Haupt,
darin die Augenäpfel reiften.”
—Rainer Rilke, Archaïscher Torso Apollos

“We always think it’s our feelings or ideas
or experiences that we struggle to translate.
But it’s words that are translatable and
untranslatable. The poem is a language-feel,
a language-idea, a language-experience we
arrive at in the first place. Only to say we
come right to the primary difficulty in
coming to the very word of it.”
—Robert Duncan
http://jacketmagazine.com/31/duncan-rilke.html

Antinous changed my life—
The bend in his torso that’s gone
And his olive-ripened bedroom eyes…
These are all things I once knew
Even tho he's gone now…

And yet his torso still lives—
The twisting of his loins back then
The nipples on his breast bending
Down toward his flat stomach
The way he was my lover…

Otherwise this stone torso—
Distending itself back into time
Has the same unheard-of beauty…
That turned so many heads
Here in Hadrian’s Court…


« Last Edit: June 13, 2008, 08:22:30 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1989


View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #835 on: June 13, 2008, 10:36:46 AM »

The past never really dies, just lingers on, repeating in endless loops.  It's human nature, reflected in music, art and poetry.  The past speaks to us and we are haunted by the power of headless and and handless statues, haunted by ancient images of the Caesars in  their decadent glory. 

Weird to see you writing on this.  I just last week started reading Gibbon's Decline and Fall.  Really like the evocative nature of Strato IV.
Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #836 on: June 13, 2008, 11:46:35 PM »

Weird to see you writing on this.  I just last week started reading Gibbon's Decline and Fall.  Really like the evocative nature of Strato IV.

I was doing some translation. Strato was Hadrian’s poet laureate & put together the anthology. I got diverted into Greek poetry after a friend sent me the following article with this quote:

"Even within the corpus of North American erotic poetry, there is a separate tradition of less known poets like Dennis Kelly, Harold Norse in his love poems, or Perry Brass, addressing gay readers, while other gay poets, like Thom Gunn, are better known because they compose for the general readership."—Dr. James Jope, "Translating Strato: The role of translations in the Study of Ancient Sexuality and the Understanding of Classical Erotica” (Mouseion, Series III vol. 5 (2005) 47-57)

http://jjope.blogspot.com/

I did some Catullus translations earlier in Chicken (SF: Gay Sunshine Press, 1979)) which James Jobe is referring to. In fact, one of the first gay poems I published was a Catullus poem in Fag Rag (Boston: 1975), an early gay lib journal.

Here’s a Google Fag Rag reprint of a 1974 Vidal interview with John Mitzel & Steve Abbott:
 
http://snipurl.com/2hsks  [books_google_com]

Some Google bookworming came up with this Emory LGBT Archive tidbit:

Fag Rag
HQ75 .F35 1971

“The Fag Rag which began in Boston Massachusetts was one of the earliest gay papers. There were three main people involved in this publication: Charles Shively, whose work and interviews appear prominently in most of the issues.  Dennis Kelly who was a poet and whose work can be found in MARBL.  The other so called founder of the Fag Rag was Ron Schreiber who was part of the Gay Liberation Front in the early to mid 1960. In 1966 he co-founded the publishing house Hanging Loose which still exists today. MARBL’s holdings consist of 13 issues ranging from issue no. 2 in the Fall of 1971 through issue no. 29.”

http://marbl.library.emory.edu/Guides/guides-lgbt.html

“It would be easy to marginalize Fag Rag were it not for the fact that it-was clearly not just operating on the fringes of the gay world and included interviews and writing by such prominent gay intellectuals as Gerald Malanga, Christopher Isherwood, bore tidal, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, John Rechy, and Ned Rorem. From the beginning, Fog Ray presented a far more complicated view of gay life than the Advocate. In so doing, Fag Rag was more revolutionary, as well a more fun.”—Patrick Moore, Beyond Shame: Reclaiming the Abandoned History of Radical Gay Sexuality, Boston: Beacon Press, 2004.   

http://snipurl.com/2hsli  [books_google_com]

Actually I had more to do with Gay Sunshine Journal and Gay Sunshine Press. Reading into university rare book rooms and archives online gives one a sense of being a part of GLBTQ social change. It makes one proud and nostalgic— and sad too because so many early activist poets and writers are gone now.       


« Last Edit: June 25, 2008, 08:05:22 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1989


View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #837 on: June 14, 2008, 12:02:46 AM »

Well done!  Don't you love name-dropping when the name they are dropping is yours?   Smiley Smiley Smiley

If you're in a Roman mood, give a listen to Resphigi's Pines of Rome....my favorite piece of music. 

I heard a close second tonight, Holst's Planets.  8 tympani, 3 trombones, 3 trumpets, 2 euphonium, SEVEN french horns (!!), 2 harps, a celeste, an organ, bunches of strings....music big time.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 12:07:04 AM by Lhoffman » Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #838 on: June 14, 2008, 01:45:55 AM »


If you're in a Roman mood, give a listen to Resphigi's Pines of Rome....my favorite piece of music. 

I heard a close second tonight, Holst's Planets.  8 tympani, 3 trombones, 3 trumpets, 2 euphonium, SEVEN french horns (!!), 2 harps, a celeste, an organ, bunches of strings....music big time.


Speaking of music, I got Joan Retallack’s book Musicage: Cage Muses on Words, Art & Music (Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1996. His last interviews. Retallack is interested in chance & poetry—and their conversations about indeterminacy are interesting.

I have Cage’s “In a Landscape” on CD & look forward to listening to the prepared piano music, electronics & Souvenir piece. I hope Retallack is more lucid than DJ Spooky. I’ve got most of his CD’s but…

« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 01:47:42 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #839 on: June 14, 2008, 01:50:48 AM »


Well done!  Don't you love name-dropping when the name they are dropping is yours?   Smiley Smiley Smiley


Oh, well, as they say: toot your horn or they’ll spit in it.

Like I said—I got diverted back into translation again by that little article popping up in the blue. Everybody needs a little positive reinforcement now & then. A rather esoteric little something from Left Field—but hey I got a buzz out of it.

I’m not a scholar like Dr. Jope—I pretty much stick to writing. But lit crit interests me—it gives me ideas sometimes. Like that Duncan article in Jacket:

http://jacketmagazine.com/31/duncan-rilke.html

Translation is an interesting artform. Duncan sticks close to translating the actual text like the Rilke German; while other poets like Robin Blaser appropriate the text itself in new ways that are their own. Making the poem their own poem—rather than a word-by-word translation. Duncan and Blaser argued about that a lot while Duncan was alive—some interesting pros & cons.

Some words just aren’t translatable—like with the Rilke poem. So my style is to ad lib like Blaser & muddle my way thru. The Pomo Homo Strato poems—they’re double-layered translations. Subverting an original Strato Greek poem—into a more contemporary poem (Mitchell, Auden, Ashbery & Rilke).

I’m being facetious when I call them “Pomo Homo”—in the sense that the new version uses certain Pomo tricks like appropriation, blockage, rupture, leakage, counterfactual narrative, misappropriation, pseudo-reference, parataxis, collage, dysraphism, pastiche, burlesque, riffing, etc.

Daryl Hines mentions in Puerilities that the audience of The Greek Anthology would have been “the authors’ coevals and/or colleagues, other older poets and lovers.” And that the boys “many of them not altogether illiterate may have read or even heard their praise, dispraise, and gratuitous, unwanted, and probably unacceptable advice.” page xv

I’ve matured somewhat since the ‘70s/’80s Catullus translations—but not much. I have my own lit crit theories but I’m not match for scholars like Hines, Dover and Davidson. The Penguin Greek Anthology and The Penguin Book of Homosexual Verse have some good translations. Hines’ is more up-to-date & modern.

I trust my intuition more than anything—ending up with “comfy” (Auden’s deliciously quaint little word used to describe things from books to lovers) poems that bridge the gap between Greece then & America now. The bridge is love—new Uranian roses are always popping up.

« Last Edit: June 25, 2008, 08:00:30 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Pages: 1 ... 54 55 [56] 57 58
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!