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Author Topic: Poetry  (Read 14053 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #840 on: June 14, 2008, 02:54:49 AM »



Strato Variations

(The Greek Anthology, ed. Peter Jay,
London: Penguin, 1981)

596

Let’s start with Strato—
Pimp of the Palatine.
Let’s skip the usual—
Alexandrian routines.
Hush Helicon Muses—
I’ve a story to tell…

607

Boss Cupid smirks—
The young Stillitano arrives.
Vain in love with himself—
Worse than Cleopatra…
Beneath his tunic swells—
A basket of ripe grapes
Making eyeballs ogle.
A virgin vineyard for sale—
At least that’s what they
Say yawning with ennui…

604

The snotty ones—
Moiling in purple drag.
They’re untouchable aloof—
Unpluckable ripe figs.

620 His Apology

Some queens think only—
Of themselves & just that.
Robes, perfume, sandals—
Villas, interior decorating.
Pompey queens so svelte—
Sacrificing to the gods.
Then in the very middle—
Of pealing a plump grape.
Mosaics & murals frozen—
By Mt. Vesuvius in drag.


(Penguin Book of Homosexual Verse,
Ed Stephen Coote, London:
Penguin, 1983)

12, 5

Dorian is pale, almost albino—
He’s got pink eyes and nice
Orange-red fuzzy pubes.
He’s just the kind of kid—
That turns heads the most.
There at the bus-stop—
He’s Samoan & Black.
He’s got Polynesian eyes—
An Afro-American build.
He’s good at basketball—
His erect nostrils quiver.
He’s a Seattle love child—
Holly Park is his home.

12, 178

All tan from the beach—
Tasty like salt-water taffy.
Seaweed in his speedo—
Pacific Ocean in his hair.
Deep-sea creamy chowder—
By the nightstand booth.
French-fries & a Coke—
Is there no end to it?
Seems like he eats forever—
When do I get my turn?

12, 184

Menèdemos is trouble—
Full of smiles & winks for
The girls on the boardwalk.
His bedroom eyes wander—
Until he catches my glance.
Then he smirks as usual—
Pretending it’s the first time.
The windows are tinted—
In the Chrysler for a reason.
He needs privacy mucho—
Nobody to see us…

12, 192

Long-haired hippies—
Remember back when you
Devoted yourself to patchouli?
Madras curtains & incense—
Sitar-music & free-love
The Blue Moon Tavern.

12, 196

His eyes are snakes—
His curly head a nest of
Black water-moccasins.
In the bayou heat—
His armpits damp in the
Louisiana swamp night.
Bordreaux boyfriend—
All his cute cousins wanna
Meet his college roommate.
I can’t speak French yet—
Long Poker games & Jax beer
Into the humid weekends.
Alligator garfish glide—
Thru the swamp at night
Jazz on the radio.

12, 227

Even when he tries not to—
He can’t help myself when
Adonis is back in town.
He passes him & then—
His twisty neck cranes
Back like a gawking giraffe.
He follows them around—
Into stores & movie theaters
It’s all so very compulsive.
How many times has he—
Sprained his neck during
Long Adonis afternoons?

12, 256

How many Venus-torsos—
Sleek smooth Dino’s physique.
Ascelpiades flexing his nice—
Biceps in the odorous violet.
Diodorus flame-haired curls—
Wiry curly-cue thorn-bed.
Saffron-crocus bellybutton—
Theron’s flat hard stomach.
Myiscus with his bored look—
Curly-headed moody mop-head.
Areta in the temple attic—
Getting laid by Zeus in disguise.
Andiades young ambassador—
Venusian viceroy with a message.


« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 02:57:30 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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Lhoffman
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« Reply #841 on: June 14, 2008, 01:56:53 PM »

Does Musicage cover much that is not in Retallack's essays on Cage in The Poethic Myth?

I'm seeing a work by Cage later this week.  We have a festival running now that is based on the idea of an integrated approach to music.  It presents music as related to art, technology, ecology.  Tomorrow we are hearing Glass as presented by a conductor from your area, Kuan.  Here is a link if you are interested. 

http://www.8daysinjune.com/
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #842 on: June 14, 2008, 02:22:08 PM »

From an interview with Cage and Cope....the question was related to the concept of zero or nothing, where to begin, sources...

It’s a good question. It’s exactly the problem that I face all the time, and it’s very difficult, because we have a memory. There’s no doubt of it. And we’re not stupid. We would be stupid if we didn’t have memory. And yet it’s that memory that one has to become free of, at the same time that you have to take advantage of it. It’s very paradoxical. Right now, I am refreshed and brought, so to speak, to zero, I think, through my work with Joyce.

I don’t know how he actually worked. I know more than I used to know. Writers like Louis Mink and Adeline Glasheen have helped. One of these mentions that you can’t understand Joyce unless you have an unabridged dictionary and the eleventh edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. And if you have both you can then see doors open on passages in Finnegans Wake which are more or less lifted from one or the other. He used these reference texts in a way that facilitated and stimulated his work.

In my way, I do the same thing in my most recent work. The passage about water in the next to last chapter of Ulysses, which was Joyce’s favorite chapter, was no doubt taken out of the encyclopedia just as I took some recent work relating to charcoal out of the encyclopedia. I added to it, of course—and I’m sure he did, too—but the skeleton was there for the having, so to speak. The dictionary is a gold mine and so is the encyclopedia. Joyce had that very great one, which I used to have as a child, but unfortunately no longer have. It was put in a garage in Southern California and mildewed; otherwise, I would try to get hold of it. Now it’s very hard to find that edition. —David Cope (1980)
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weezo
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« Reply #843 on: June 15, 2008, 02:22:21 AM »

And, now for a pause to play in the sandbox.

Check out this poem, entitled "Utter Nonsense" that crowded the sleep out of my brain until I had to get up and write it.

http://www.educationalsynthesis.org/language/UtterNonsense.html

Critiques welcome!
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« Reply #844 on: June 15, 2008, 11:34:14 AM »

And, now for a pause to play in the sandbox.

Check out this poem, entitled "Utter Nonsense" that crowded the sleep out of my brain until I had to get up and write it.

http://www.educationalsynthesis.org/language/UtterNonsense.html

Critiques welcome!


Quite playful, and I can see active little boys having fun with this, perhaps being inspired to play with language on their own.  Lotsa potential for some great illustrations here....I am picturing the snorers toppling trees or a look of horror on the faces of the zebras being pursued by the yammering yappers Cheesy Cheesy

But a few things.  First from the standpoint of a reader...the word "knitters" a representative of N could be confusing...nits, nags?  On the other hand, the vocab is advanced enough that children who could read it would have passed the "kn" as "n" stage.

Xylophones played "by" X-men?  Or perhaps you are picturing a xylophone as a characters, along the likes of Sponge-Bob Square Pants?

The other is the word "hymn"...which would have positive connotations.  Perhaps hackers harbor "hate?"
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #845 on: June 15, 2008, 11:38:27 AM »

Illustration:  or a perplexed elephant with a mouthful of feathers.   A brave little mouse shaking his fist at mountaineers while his mother tries to pull him back and a bunch of old ladies commiserate..."Oh dear..."

Sometimes I read something that does so make me wish I could draw.  What fun it would be to illustrate this!  Do you see it along the lines of the Seussian or more like Sendak?
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 11:48:29 AM by Lhoffman » Logged
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« Reply #846 on: June 15, 2008, 11:45:46 AM »

For sheer beauty and complexity of illustration, my favorite Alphabet reader:

« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 11:48:45 AM by Lhoffman » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #847 on: June 15, 2008, 11:57:21 PM »



Nutty Nonsense Poem
From A-Z


And, now for a pause to play in the sandbox. Check out this poem, entitled
"Utter Nonsense" that crowded the sleep out of my brain until I had to get up and write it.
http://www.educationalsynthesis.org/language/UtterNonsense.html
Critiques welcome!

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Congress has another session
Full of blundering Assholes.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Batches of bumbling bumpkins
Bitching in the Beltway.   
 
Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Crying bought-off crybabies
We voted in these cretins?

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Denny Dimwit I may be
But not a drooling Democrat.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Exciting exits so eviscerating
Off to Paraguay they go.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Isn’t that where Fascists go
When free people say fuck you.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Gee whiz gesus christ
Gimme a break will ya?

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Going To Hell in a Handbasket
The Republican Way to go.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
The Dribble Down Theory
Itchy Icky Insectoid Lobbyists.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Jeering juicy jackoffs
Senators in the Tearooms.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Kitschy klumsy kockroaches
Kissing ass in kreepy Kongess.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Louche laughing Lobbyists
Little weekend lovey-doo’s. 

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Masculine men in tutu’s
Making out with Ministers.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Naughty Neocon Nitwits
Pondering Nearing Nooses.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Beltway Opera Queens opining
Speaker of the House gives head.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Pale pretty pouty penises
Congressional Interns in demand!!!

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Queers and quacks quibbling now
Over Mortgages and interior decorating.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Rolls-Royces racing down rat-holes
While Shell Oil Rigs drain us dry.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Sleek streamlined Supertankers
Slink smarmily sneakily back home.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Tragic treaties like NAFTA
Treating us with trickle-down tricks.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Underworld unutterable overlords
Dreaming up more Unforgettables.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Viscous vibrating Volga Tasers
Voluptuous dildo high-voltages.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Back before my little Wee-Wee
Wept with Whanking Wonder.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Back when I was an X-Man
The Boy With the X-Ray Eyes. 

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
I used to be a Yippy-Hippy
Yukking it up in ’68 Chicago.

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
But now I’m a Big Fat ZERO
Zippity Do-Da Me…

« Last Edit: June 16, 2008, 04:54:45 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #848 on: June 16, 2008, 12:12:56 AM »

 Tough choice: 

 Cheesy Cheesy

or

 Cry Cry


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pugetopolis
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« Reply #849 on: June 16, 2008, 03:13:30 AM »

And, now for a pause to play in the sandbox. Check out this poem, entitled
"Utter Nonsense" that crowded the sleep out of my brain until I had to get up and write it.
http://www.educationalsynthesis.org/language/UtterNonsense.html
Critiques welcome!

Well, you asked for a critique.   Cheesy

“Utter Nonsense—From A to Z”
by Anne Louise Pemberton

http://www.educationalsynthesis.org/language/UtterNonsense.html

The idea I suppose being that the comic absurdity of Anne Louise Pemberton’s “Utter Nonsense—From A to Z” can go anywhere—and it does doesn’t it? It goes in many different directions—playing with the absurd from A thru Z. 

For example, Pemberton’s stanza for “C” has the almost childish absurdity of a fairy tale:

Ickey, ickey, foo, foo,
I see a boo-boo.
A cookie crushed a can of corn;
A cat showed no concern.

The stanza for “G” is funny and ironic:

Icky, Icky, Foo, Foo
I see a boo-boo.
Garbage in is garbage out;
The germs go galloping onward.

The stanza for “H” strangely eerie and elegiac:

Icky, icky, foo, foo,
I see a boo-boo.
A hacker hums a hymn at night;
His harddrive hunts for home.

The stanza for “X” intriguingly sci-fi.

Ickey, ickey, foo, foo,
I see a boo-boo.
X-rays showed the X-men
Exiting from existence.

The “I” stanza is interesting:

Ickey, ickey, foo, foo
I see a boo-boo.
Prancing ponies dance for a price
Poisoning pretty tunes

The stanza for “I” is sort of a riddle with “prancing ponies” heading off into some kind of perhaps merry-go-round tune direction—maybe once pretty but perhaps melancholy now. Former objects of childhood joy change sometimes—sometimes we outgrow them or other things catch up with us so that perhaps the merry-go-ground vision of childhood turns sour on us. As Thomas Wolfe said, you can never go back home?

And so forth from A to Z. My take on “Utter Nonsense” is more like a political poem I suppose—running with a Campaign Forum theme from A to Z in an amateur poli-sci major way. Absurdity and political satire sometimes goes hand in hand—at least that’s the direction Pemberton’s “Utter Nonsense” took me. Thank you. That will be $1000.


« Last Edit: June 16, 2008, 05:25:46 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #850 on: June 16, 2008, 05:11:02 AM »

Anne Louise Pemberton’s "Nutty Nonsense Poem
From A-Z"


http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,112.msg95798.html#msg95798


Tough choice: 

 Cheesy Cheesy

or

 Cry Cry


Yes I suppose—but it seems to me that’s what absurdity is.

A contradiction & paradox. Several of Anne Louise Pemberton’s stanzas in “Utter Nonsense—From A to Z” are that way. I picked a couple of Pemberton’s stanzas and looked at them that way—the sweet & sour sauce of childhood memories for example.

I like Pemberton’s poem—it’s the kind of poem that makes me stop & think & makes me want to go with it. The direction I went was more a Polymorphously Perverse Poli-Sci one—using Campaign Trail rhetoric & issues as a theme.

That’s the kind of “critique” I usually do—in longhand but more & more on a laptop. A poem critiquing another poem. But I’m not bashful—I’ll stoop to critique with prose too. Like Weezo’s note & this one for you.

Yes, Pemberton’s poem is a disturbing one isn’t it? But that's the way they work sometimes. They almost have a life of their own. I can imagine Anne tossing & turning in bed with those funny little lines going thru her head. It's happened to me & the only thing you can do is turn on the light & hopefully have a notebad on your nightstand to write it down quick. Like dreams, they're immediate & get lost easily. This one of hers has a recurrent stanza song-like opening 2-lines that helps to move the thing forward. Anne's poem is happy & childlike; I wonder if it could be added to her Language Art section on her homepage? Alas, I'm much too jaded for such a lovely approach; I'm more the Great Expectations type, i.e. Miss Havisham.  Cheesy



« Last Edit: June 16, 2008, 05:35:07 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #851 on: June 16, 2008, 05:58:04 AM »

Puge,

Thank you so much for your critique. It tells me I have hit on something. Children often like rhythmic poems without meaning or will funny meanings. Some of these may be over kids' heads, and I am trying to get a few parents I can trust to try out the poem on kids and to let me know which ones are just too much for them. As you found out, it is entirely possible to insert whole new stanzas within the repeating lines and the poem goes on.

And, instead of grabbing pen and paper to jot down the lines, I had to get up and type them in. I did a lot of extra sleeping yesterday to make up for the middle of the night excitement, but each time I woke again, I added to the poem. I like the way you picked up so well on the various plays on words, such as the Rolls Royce.

As soon as I make more than $1000 on the poem, I will send you your fee for the critique. It was really quite a compliment!

And, I am in the process of redecorating the Language Arts section of my website when this inspiration hit, so, hopefully in the next few days it will be orderly and well-included. I imagine going to visit my one-year old niece who is just learning to talk, and discovering her saying the repeating refrain, perhaps with her own "boo-boos" for the stanzas. That will make me feel very much like I've written a good poem.

And, here I've been thinking my muse deserted me these past few months. It's baaacccckkkk!

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« Reply #852 on: June 17, 2008, 02:11:49 AM »



Elementary Beaches
—for Nnyhav & Raymond Queneau

XII

Monsoon lite             Lakefront                    Cabana
                            Seagull screech
   
Blue Lake               Dumpy dock                Bayliner
Whitecaps   

Rocking boats          Blackbirds                  Cool
                             Moiling coots              Breeze
                             Cloudy skies   
        
                             Some cigarette
                             butts   
                             A few floating
                             prophylactics   
                             A few dead fish:   
                             A Coors can,   
                             Miller’s, Budweiser,   
                             Coke, Guinness,   
                             Carlsberg, Dr Pepper   
        
Persistent                Scudding clouds          Strange
moody                                                     harmony

                              Twilight sky   


Notes

“Raymond Queneau, Elementary Morality (trans Philip Terry): His last book (1975), now available in English translation by a fellow poet…”
—nnyhav, Stochastic Bookmark
http://nnyhav.blogspot.com/

“The form I employed for the estuary poems is one created by another Frenchman, Raymond Queneau, a form which has come to be known as the 'elementary morality' after his 1975 volume of the same name. Queneau describes it as follows: 'First come 3 series of 3+1 pairs each consisting of a noun and adjective (or participle), freely including repetitions, rhymes, alliterations, and echoes; next, a kind of interlude of 7 lines, each 1 to 5 syllables long; last, a conclusion of 3+1 pairs of words (noun and adjective or participle), more or less recapitulating several of the 24 words of the first part.”

“Supremely visual in its nature, the form has many attractions: its appearance on the page, suggestive of receding flatnesses, seems perfectly adapted to the depiction of estuarine landscapes; and simultaneously, in its mathematical rigour, it functions like a grid or a primitive pinhole camera, able to capture and freeze elements of a place or a landscape as in a time capsule. Then, finally, the form, previously unexplored in English, nevertheless finds its echo in the very roots of English poetry, the kennings of Anglo-Saxon verse.”

http://tinyurl.com/66jmbc


« Last Edit: June 17, 2008, 02:58:26 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #853 on: June 18, 2008, 09:49:04 PM »

Interesting, Pugey. When the rules are violated, is it no longer elementary, or is it immoral? Wink (The interlude is described a little differently by Bellos, as having 2-7 syllables rather than 1-5.)

But highlighting Philip Terry's "echo in the very roots of English poetry, the kennings of Anglo-Saxon verse” -- there's a further Anglo-Saxon echo in the split line, 2-2 stresses organized in quatrains mirrored by the 3-1 word pairs. Not that either was intended.
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« Reply #854 on: June 21, 2008, 05:51:18 AM »

Interesting, Pugey. When the rules are violated, is it no longer elementary, or is it immoral? Wink (The interlude is described a little differently by Bellos, as having 2-7 syllables rather than 1-5.)

But highlighting Philip Terry's "echo in the very roots of English poetry, the kennings of Anglo-Saxon verse” -- there's a further Anglo-Saxon echo in the split line, 2-2 stresses organized in quatrains mirrored by the 3-1 word pairs. Not that either was intended.

Nnyhav, thank you.

I've been enjoying your latest posting over at Stochastic Bookmark “filling forms in or out”...

http://nnyhav.blogspot.com/

Poetic forms & structure interest me:

Raymond Queneau, Elementary Morality (trans Philip Terry): His last book (1975), now available in English translation by a fellow poet who himself follows the form that Queneau established here: 'Elementary Estuaries': A Work-In-Progress by Philip Terry
   
http://tinyurl.com/66jmbc

I like your blog becuse it's intellectually challenging.

Plus I enjoy "abstruse unfinished commentary" (Borges).

Speaking of "abstruse unfinished commentary," I've been enjoying Steinese writing over with the Stein-L group(s).

Lately discussing BOTDRF ("Blood on the Dining Room Floor") Gertrude's anti-detective story.

http://listproc.ucdavis.edu/archives/stein-l/log0806/


« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 06:16:00 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
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