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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 12978 times)
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Dzimas
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« Reply #495 on: October 19, 2007, 04:50:24 AM »

But which do you suppose changed the world more or robbed us of any lingering illusions we might have harbored about the goodness of man?  WWI or WWII? 

As far as Europe is concerned, I think WWI had the bigger impact.  Before the war, early modernists saw war as a cleansing agent, as in the Futurist Manifesto of 1909,

We want to glorify war - the only cure for the world - militarism, patriotism, the destructive gesture of the anarchists, the beautiful ideas which kill, and contempt for woman.
http://www.cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/T4PM/futurist-manifesto.html

While Marinetti didn't change his tune after the war, supporting the National Fascist Party of Italy, the movement was pretty much crushed with the loss of two of its leading members, Antonio Sant'Elia,



and Umberto Boccioni,



during the war. Modernism would embrace a more socialist vision, with the aim being to rebuild cities, provide housing and social amenities that were for the People.  I think this socialist vision also infused art and cinema, especially in the epic films of Eisenstien,



Hard to really gauge Lang's Metropolis.  It can be read as an indictment against Modernism, especially since he has specific visual references to modern art and architecture at the time, but it seems more an indictment against industrialism which he viewed as anti-human. 

« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 05:21:51 AM by Dzimas » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #496 on: October 19, 2007, 07:19:35 AM »



Opening Pandora’s Box


About 5 years, Philip Glass and the Kronos Quartet were in Vilnius and performed their soundtrack for Dracula in the old Lietuva cinema, with the movie playing on a wrap-around screen behind them.  It was grand!




Right now I'm on "Three Penny Opera"  and after that, "Diary of a Lost Girl," "Symphony of a Great City."  Then I'll probably be compelled to watch a slew of Fritz Lang....I'd forgotten how much I like the Germans.


Yes, I’ve got to get Three Penny Opera and watch it too—so we can continue our leisurely chat over in the Movie Club—Dzimas’ idea of a Kronos Quartet soundtrack for Pandora’s Box sounds pretty neat doesn’t it—especially when I slipped that 75th Anniversary Dracula DVD into the machine—and listened to it again—really spooky and eerie—like watching it for the first time—funny what a new soundtrack does to enhance a classic silent movie-thriller—wonder what Kronos would do with Louise Brooks—a nice disquieting Dracula’s Daughter moonlight sonata?


I did a little experiment last night. I listened to the Kronos Dracula DVD on my laptop—while watching Pandora’s Box on flatscreen. It was a completely new movie. I sensed the more sinister femme fatale aspect to Lucille Brooks—with Kronos in the background.

The really strange eerie Kronos quartet opening credits of Dracula—completely changed the art deco apartment at the beginning of Pandora’s Box. I don’t know how Kronos does it—just the right touch of strings that’s all it takes. It doesn’t take an orchestra—then the quick shocking strings when Dwight Frye cuts his finger with a paperclip in Dracula’s castle bedroom. That got my attention real quick—and I felt some very real and authentic horror frisson going up the back of my neck making the hair stand up erect. I hadn’t had that feeling since my Midnight Movie Bijou nights—back when I was a kid huddled in the balcony with The Thing and Them and The Creature From the Black Lagoon…looming down on me.

The Kronos Dracula soundtrack on my earphones—made Pandora’s Box much scarier—especially the weird Jack the Ripper scene at the end. That Lucille Brooks found “Jack” the sexiest guy on the set made more sense with Kronos—the fascination she had with death and male beauty. Körtner had strength and power—but Jack had sex appeal…

Tonight I’ll do the same thing with Metropolis and M—listening to Kronos. The thing I have to remember is that sound was new back then—the opening scene of Fritz Lang’s The Testament of Dr. Mabuse for example. Lang was a quick study—learning to use soundtracks effectively with film. The incessant pounding Factory thumping at the beginning—it caught my attention right away.

No wonder Hitler was an avid moviegoer—his own private theater for Metropolis and his other futuristic favorites. Leni Riefenstahl in many ways was closer to him than the Propaganda Dwarf who was very jealous of her. The struggle over the opening shots of Triumph of the Will—the Luftwaffe vision of Hitler’s plane flying down thru the clouds to the Nuremberg Rally—almost didn’t make it on screen. The dwarf wanted generals—but Hitler sided with Riefenstahl…

The way film and the will to power work together—Lucille Brooks paid attention to it. Not just to Riefenstahl or Pabst—but looking at how Weimar culture handled it. Since she already was aware of power-politics—and how it worked within the studio system in early Hollywood.

Film as the ultimate artform of power-politics—all the way from Weimar to FOX-News today…

« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 11:01:23 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #497 on: October 19, 2007, 07:32:13 AM »



This morning I watched Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will—

With the Kronos Quartet Dracula soundtrack...

Again the most most interesting thing—

A totally new film...incredibly evil and powerful...

Hitler as Dracula...the SS with Skull and Crossbones...

Night of the Swastika... Night of the Living Dead...

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“Other people's obsessions
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Dzimas
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« Reply #498 on: October 19, 2007, 07:32:25 AM »

Quote
Right now I'm on "Three Penny Opera"  and after that, "Diary of a Lost Girl," "Symphony of a Great City."  Then I'll probably be compelled to watch a slew of Fritz Lang....I'd forgotten how much I like the Germans.



Symphony of a Great City is one of my all-time favorites, absolutely mesmerizing to watch.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #499 on: October 19, 2007, 09:35:33 AM »



You can view this movie free here:

http://www.archive.org/details/BerlinSymphonyofaGreatCity

Either Stream or Play/Download. Cheers
« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 10:01:29 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #500 on: October 19, 2007, 11:55:21 AM »




Glass/Kronos/Dracula

http://www.philipglass.com/html/recordings/dracula.html

“The film is considered a classic. I felt the score needed to evoke the feeling of the world of the 19th century — for that reason I decided a string quartet would be the most evocative and effective. I wanted to stay away from the obvious effects associated with horror films. With Kronos we were able to add depth to the emotional layers of the film.”— Philip Glass

NOTES:

Two trailblazing new music artists — Kronos Quartet and composer Philip Glass — come together once again for a recording of the first original score for the Universal Pictures 1931 horror film classic Dracula, starring Béla Lugosi. Glass's score marks the first-ever for a film which the composer himself considers a classic. "Many films have been made based on Dracula since the original in 1931 — however, none is equal to the original in eloquence or the sheer power to move us." There have in fact been many screen versions of Bram Stoker's classic tale of Dracula, but none more famous or enduring than the 1931 original. Starring Béla Lugosi as the world's best known vampire and directed by horror specialist Tod Browning, Universal Studios' Dracula creates an eerie, chilling mood that has rarely been realized since. Dracula's initial theatrical release coincided with the transition from silent pictures to "talkies." At that time limited technology existed to present the film as a sound picture, so no musical score was ever composed and there were few sound effects. Browning relied on Lugosi's legendary Hungarian accent to give the film its distinctive sound. Glass's new original score for Dracula was commissioned by Universal Family and Home Entertainment Production for inclusion as part of Universal's Classic Monsters collection, to be released on video on August 31. Philip Glass, in commenting on writing this score, said, "The film is considered a classic. I felt the score needed to evoke the feeling of the world of the 19th century — for that reason I decided a string quartet would be the most evocative and effective. I wanted to stay away from the obvious effects associated with horror films. With Kronos we were able to add depth to the emotional layers of the film." Philip Glass and Kronos Quartet made their first collaborative recording in 1985 for the Paul Schrader film Mishima, after which Kronos commissioned the composer's Quartet No. 5, and subsequently recorded it along with three others for a 1995 Nonesuch release.
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jbottle
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« Reply #501 on: October 19, 2007, 01:35:44 PM »

You're quite the cut and paste and italicize artist..
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #502 on: October 19, 2007, 02:11:36 PM »

Great forum for lurking around.I feel the K/SF would have done good business in those days.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #503 on: October 19, 2007, 02:29:05 PM »



"Listen to them...children of the night........."

"What m-u-s-i-c they make........."


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Dzimas
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« Reply #504 on: October 19, 2007, 02:41:46 PM »

It is a fun forum, martin, and you are more than welcome to join in.  And, old bottle even drops by from time to time just to show us all how jealous he is of the good time we are having. 

Thanks for the link, puget.  Hope you enjoyed the link to The Passion of Jeanne d'Arc, which contains the film in its entirety.  I suppose a lot of these films are in the public domain, until someone like Ted Turner comes along and buys them up.
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jbottle
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« Reply #505 on: October 19, 2007, 04:45:05 PM »

I'll take you word for it funboy, but I haven't read a word of puget's effusive bullshit for several moons now, but if you want to bring me in to piss on it more, well, I'm your boy.
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jbottle
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« Reply #506 on: October 19, 2007, 05:13:19 PM »

...and "Metropolis" is not all that hard to figure...
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jbottle
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« Reply #507 on: October 20, 2007, 03:07:54 AM »

...nothing personal, I hate the word "jealous," and it didn't really apply, I like it if you are having a good conversation, but, yeah, in a civil manner, I don't think that anybody said anything, nothing personal...
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Dzimas
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« Reply #508 on: October 20, 2007, 03:34:30 AM »

Then why do you even bother to come over here, bottle boy? You can post all you like in the movies forum, predicting this week's box office hits, reveling in the latest teen flick or soft porn flick that tickled your imagination, or fulminating on the classic works of Paul Verhoeven.  But, no, like hippie who loved to eavesdrop on the old NYTimes forums and tell us what a bunch of hacks we were, you do the same here.  Lighten up, pal!
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Dzimas
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« Reply #509 on: October 20, 2007, 03:52:26 AM »

There was the Giorgio Moroder version of Metropolis.  The best thing about it was Freddie Mercury doing "Love Kills."  Pat Benetar's "Here's My Heart" wasn't too bad,

http://www.amazon.com/Metropolis-1984-Re-release-1927-Film/dp/B00000260Q/ref=sr_1_1/002-4086232-9828850?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1192866530&sr=1-1

Years ago when I was living in DC, I would go to the East Wing of the National Gallery each Saturday for screenings of classic silent movies, replete with strings.  I wonder if they still do that.  There was usually a pretty good crowd on hand, and the auditorium was perfect the perfect venue for such events.
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