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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 21942 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #585 on: October 26, 2007, 03:20:05 AM »




Like I said, you can bring a pussy to a movie, but you can't help him understand it.

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« Reply #586 on: October 26, 2007, 04:39:51 AM »

Polly


In the French version, we don't hear Polly speak until the wedding. 
I didn't notice, but is this true in the German also?



Polly hardly speaks at all up until the wedding scene—not in the Cuttlefish Hotel, a little on the boat during “Liebeslied.” But she gets warmed up during the wedding commenting on the bridal dinner “junk,” getting the Reverend to stay for the wedding and a comment about being hungry. Then there’s “Polly’s Song.” On the stairs as Polly says goodbye there’s a few little things said.

All of which makes her descent down the steps to assert herself to the Macheath gang by raising her voice, slapping one of the minions and taking control all the more startling. Up until then just a demure Fräulein…
« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 05:16:58 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #587 on: October 26, 2007, 04:43:07 AM »


Otto Dix “All Things Beautiful"

The Wedding Party

The wedding party is like an Otto Dix painting…

The poor dumb child-idiot minions sitting at the table with cartoon-looks on their sad uncomprehending faces. Dressed up in suits, surrounded by stolen luxuries, elegant candelabra and lighted candles, exquisite food and wine—all of it thrown-together in an abandoned warehouse basement. Even a wedding bed…

I froze-frame the shot—just to study their faces. They were caricatures of themselves—out of Dix’s painting “All Things Beautiful.”
« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 05:32:39 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #588 on: October 26, 2007, 05:07:39 AM »







The Minions

Screen-capture shots of some of Macheath's minions.
They all do an excellent job of being a rather stupified
bunch of minions trying to act bourgeois but finding it
difficult...


« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 05:30:14 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #589 on: October 26, 2007, 10:50:18 AM »

"a German all time classic silent horror-movie from 1922 called Nosferatu-Eine Symphonie des Grauens (Nosferatu-a Symphony of Horror)." This is what Malkovich as Murnau is filming and why he hires Dafoe as Schreck who played Nosferatu.   

I preferred Klaus Kinski but always mistakenly view anything by Willem Dafoe.  I am sure you will realize as you read these quotes from the dialogue that this film, despite mood,proposes a send up very much in the manner of Gene Wilder directed by Mel Brooks. It is a spoof, which may be the only thing that accounts for complaints of discontinuity in shots that the director and cinematographer intentionally used to convey the happenstance and piecemeal way Murnau approached film-making.

I also watch everything Malkovich does; in particular his European productions of the Patricia Highsmith contributions: Ripley.  I should however particularly in light of what we've discussed thus far like to see his 2006 portrayal of: Klimt, directed by Raul Ruiz ( who directed Time Regained, since they are in the same genre; detailed period realizations of a Creative Artist of the first order).

Memorable quotes for
Shadow of the Vampire

F.W. Murnau: Why him, you monster? Why not the... script girl?
Max Schreck: Oh. The script girl. I'll eat her later.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: I will not allow you to destroy my picture!
Max Schreck: This is hardly your picture any longer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: Did I kill one of your people, Murnau? I can't remember.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Murnau: They don't need to act. They need to *be*.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: If it's not in frame, it doesn't exist!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: I would like some makeup.
F.W. Murnau: Well, you don't get any.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: There was a time... when I... fed from golden chalices. But now... Don't look at me that way!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Ladies and gentlemen, this is Max Schreck, who will be portraying our vampire, Count Orlock. As you no doubt have heard, Max's methods are somewhat... unconventional, but... I am sure you will come to respect his artistry in this matter.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: I feed like an old man pees - sometimes all at once, sometimes drop by drop.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: I told you, I feed erratically, and often enormously.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Asked what he thought of the book, Dracula]
Max Schreck: It made me sad.
Albin: Why sad?
Max Schreck: Because Dracula had no servants.
Albin: I think you missed the point of the book, Count Orlock.
Max Schreck: Dracula hasn't had servants in 400 years and then a man comes to his ancestral home, and he must convince him that he... that he is like the man. He has to feed him, when he himself hasn't eaten food in centuries. Can he even remember how to buy bread? How to select cheese and wine? And then he remembers the rest of it. How to prepare a meal, how to make a bed. He remembers his first glory, his armies, his retainers, and what he is reduced to. The loneliest part of the book comes... when the man accidentally sees Dracula setting his table.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Greta Schroder: Hey, who died?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: Go to hell, Murnau!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Why would you possibly want to be in a play when you could be in a film?
Greta Schroeder: An audience gives me life. This... thing only takes it from me.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Albin: What is the most wondrous thing you ever saw?
Henrik Galeen: I once saw Greta Schroeder naked.
Albin: That beats ectoplasm!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Go ahead! Eat the writer! That will leave you explaining how your character gets to Bremen!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Death of centuries! Moonchaser! Blasphemer! Monkey! Vase of prehistory. Finally to Earth, and finally born.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Albin, collect the wooden stake and return it to its rightful place; it is necessary for the final frame, to remind us of the inadequacies of our plans, our contingencies, every missed train and failed picnic, every lie to a child.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Time will no longer be a dark spot on our lungs. They will no longer say 'you had to have been there', because the fact is, Albin, we were.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[last lines]
F.W. Murnau: I think we have it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. Murnau: Our battle, our struggle, is to create art. Our weapon is the moving picture. Because we have the moving picture, our paintings will grow and recede; our poetry will be shadows that lengthen and conceal; our light will play across living faces that laugh and agonize; and our music will linger and finally overwhelm, because it will have a context as certain as the grave. We are scientists engaged in the creation of memory... but our memory will neither blur nor fade.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: I don't think we need the writer any longer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Max Schreck: Tell me how you would harm me - when even I don't know how I could harm myself.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fritz Arno 'Fritzy' Wagner: Is the camera loaded?
Paul: Yes sir
Fritz Arno 'Fritzy' Wagner: Good, so am I...
                                           
                                        ***

I did view this one afternoon in about the hottest day in July, when my landlord had a little Amishman up on the roof to repair or paint something; and I realized after a moment, that I would have to turn down the sound, given some of the "language" exchanged in this film all in good humor and to convey the essential "German" characteristic that I grew up with hearing so that it caused my grandmother to always warn my uncles,"Little pitchers have big ears".   As brothers, they had no compunction about their choice of language; this relationship holds between Murnau and Schreck.

Location was Gehaansbierg and Dudelange, Luxembourg; with interiors shot at Castle Vianden,Luxembourg.

I have some aerial shots of the locale around someplace in my favorites, which they better might have used to convey the mood. There is apparently a Letzebuergesh sound version of this film; my grandfather's dialect or rather our relatives are still speaking it over there.

One last, lest I forget to mention it, Eddie Izzard is amidst the cast.
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jbottle
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« Reply #590 on: October 26, 2007, 02:05:59 PM »

Faulkner wrote "The Big Sleep," and is a genius, even if his prose is bourbon soaked and there are a few plot holes in TBS.  Not bad to have a top 100 film under your belt and be in the conversation of the best novelist of the 20th Century, and Nobel Laureate, all while basically trying to save the family farm.
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« Reply #591 on: October 26, 2007, 02:11:55 PM »

Jbottle, these pussies you cite, which of us are you directing that to?  Which movie is it that said pussy(s) do not understand?
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harrie
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« Reply #592 on: October 26, 2007, 02:18:18 PM »

Well, geez, one of my cats watches an awful lot of  movies, but I don't think he understands them too much.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #593 on: October 26, 2007, 03:17:10 PM »

Murnau

Thank you Maddy for the Murnau quotes...

Another German genius like Pabst and Lang...

We can learn so much from these perceptive directors...

About the zeitgeist... and ourselves...


 Smiley Smiley Smiley
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #594 on: October 26, 2007, 03:19:05 PM »



The Big Sleep (1946)


Faulkner wrote "The Big Sleep"………..


Faulkner didn’t write The Big Sleep.

Raymond Chandler wrote it.

Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman wrote the screenplay.

There’s a huge difference between any NOVEL and a SCREENPLAY.

Faulkner and Howard Hawks consulted Chandler about the NOVEL throughout the SCREENPLAY writing process, e.g. they even called Chandler to see who killed the young chauffeur in love with Carmen Sternwood. He ended up off a dock in the Pacific Ocean… dead and not from a broken-heart either.

Raymond Chandler just shrugged… Who cares he said…

And I’m getting to that point myself… about a lot of things...

You keep making these wild assertions about Films and Writers and Directors (want to see a List?Huh)—without doing any Research or Reading or even Seeing the Movie. Just one-line know-it-all snarky posts...

That’s why I created the Movie Club—to Elucidate Cinema…not Obscure it the way you’re constantly doing it…

This isn’t the NYTimes anymore—your hot-dogging film crit is bourgeois and lacks substance.

For example, it’s obvious you haven’t seen nor want to see the Films we’re discussing—Pan’s Labyrinth, Pandora’s Box and Threepenny Opera. Any yet you constantly post here almost proud of yourself...

Which is your loss…not mine.

You could learn a lot about yourself and Wiemar/Nazi cinema...

If you would just swallow your pride and WATCH Threepenny Opera...

Pabst and Brecht/Weil... they're very relevant now to us...

« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 03:36:37 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #595 on: October 26, 2007, 03:50:17 PM »

Pugetoplis....The Wedding Party.....Mackie's gang has that sort of poor dumb child idiot minion quality about it in the French version, too, but here they begin to eat before Polly sings.  Somehow this makes them seem all the more childish. 

Jenny's pirate song makes more sense in the French because it is translated somewhat differently and because her prior relationship is stressed more than it was in the German.  But her whole change of heart makes less sense here because we do know the history.

This Dix reminds me of TPO, too.  But if you look at his war work, you will see an entirely different world.  Quite devastating.



Madupont....too funny....
Quote
I did view this one afternoon in about the hottest day in July, when my landlord had a little Amishman up on the roof to repair or paint something; and I realized after a moment, that I would have to turn down the sound, given some of the "language" exchanged in this film all in good humor and to convey the essential "German" characteristic that I grew up with hearing so that it caused my grandmother to always warn my uncles,"Little pitchers have big ears".   As brothers, they had no compunction about their choice of language; this relationship holds between Murnau and Schreck.



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jbottle
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« Reply #596 on: October 26, 2007, 07:42:19 PM »

Yeah, I couldn't get into "Pan's Labyrinth," guilty, and was confused by the bug at the beginning and bored and so I ejected it to watch "Deja Vu," which didn't have as much ART GOING FOR IT.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #597 on: October 27, 2007, 08:58:44 AM »



Capt. Francesca 'Franky' Cook: “Leni Riefenstahl.
I've heard so much about you. It's a pleasure to
finally meet the competition.”


 Smiley Smiley Smiley
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #598 on: October 27, 2007, 09:37:26 AM »


Well, geez, one of my cats watches an awful lot of movies,
but I don't think he understands them too much.


Harriette

Yawn, I guess he's just another dumb pussy....
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« Reply #599 on: October 27, 2007, 02:54:28 PM »




Warming up, my dear, for Fritz Lang's M....

It's time to introduce some real Euro-decadence to this wonderful...

Group of enthusiastic klug Cineastes..........

Well, Hoffman... aren't we having fun?

The French wedding scene, yes, exquisitely decadent wasn't it?

The cute young swine... simply famished...

But then, my dear, young hoodlums can be so cute in both Berlin and Paris...

How Brecht despised the bourgeoisie (Bugerschaft)...

Or was it the petite bourgeoisie (Kleinbugertum)...

Or was there any bourgeoisie left to despise...

Reichbanknotes in wheelbarrows...

Galgenleider a la Christian Morgenstern, nicht wahr?

Ah. the Wedding Scene... the only scene Brecht laughed at...

Pabst... perhaps more radical than Brecht herself...

How many Mother Courages does it take?

Louise Brooks... the Queen of Weimar Cinema...

I salute you... I kiss your feet...

Lulu in Berlin!!!!!!!!






« Last Edit: October 27, 2007, 03:00:24 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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