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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 22710 times)
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #795 on: November 09, 2007, 12:37:23 PM »

Pugetopolis..."...and there it is big as life, the genie-soul of the place which, wherever you go, you must meet and master first thing or be met and mastered...."
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jbottle
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« Reply #796 on: November 10, 2007, 01:17:10 AM »

Is that from "Karate Kid" or something?  Awesome.
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #797 on: November 10, 2007, 11:40:20 AM »

LMAO.
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #798 on: November 10, 2007, 12:01:36 PM »

absolutement
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #799 on: November 10, 2007, 01:51:27 PM »



The Saddest Music in the World (2004)

“Serbia v. Scotland”

[A tardy Gavillo the Great finally appears on the stage to face the impatient audience.]

[Audience boos.]

Contest announcer: “We’ve heard much talk about his plaintive cello which has drawn enough moisture from hardened old-world eyes to fill the English Channel…”

[Audience grows silent.]

Gavillo the Great: “Now what is that stink?!!!! Is this a hog barn or a concert hall?!!!!”

[Gavillo plays cello.]

[Buzzer.]

[Audience boos.]

Contest announcer: “And now a word from Lady Port-Huntley Beer!!!


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“Other people's obsessions
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #800 on: November 10, 2007, 02:28:51 PM »


Talia Pura as Mary, the announcer
of the saddest music contest, along
with co-announcer, Claude Dorge.


The Saddest Music in the World (2004)

[buzzer]

Claude Dorge, contest co-announcer: “ And now Fellow Pigs…
A word from Lady Port-Huntley Beer!!!”

[Audience boos, oinks, raises their glasses.]

“Get up!!!
Get your boots on!!!
Hurry up, Hurry up!!!
Times a wastin’!!!
If you’re not tastin’!!!
Lady Port-Huntley Beer!!!

Can’t wait to drink!!!
One down, two down!!!
Three down oink!!!
C’mon time’s a wastin’!!!
If you’re not tastin’!!!
Lady Port-Huntley Beer!!!


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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #801 on: November 10, 2007, 03:26:00 PM »

What the fuck?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #802 on: November 10, 2007, 03:39:29 PM »



"I watched a DVD the other day that instantly skyrocketed to my list of 10 all-time favorite films. It’s called “The Saddest Music in the World” and stars Isabella Rossellini as a crazed, double amputee (yes, you heard me) beer baronness named Lady Port-Huntley, Mark McKinney (of “Kids in the Hall” fame) as washed up Broadway producer Chester Kent, and Portuguese actress Maria de Medeiros as his amnesiac girlfriend Narcissa. The story takes place in 1933 in desolate, freezing Winnipeg, Canada, and it’s the most original, demented plot I’ve seen in decades, as Rossellini starts a contest to see which country can produce the world’s saddest music. She’s offering a $25,000 prize which, at the height of the Depression, attracts hordes of contestants, each one wailing a tune more miserable than the next. The film came out last year but the cinematography is absolutely brilliant in the way it evokes the sparkling black and white of the early 30s. Canadian Guy Maddin is my new favorite director and the DVD comes with several of his equally unique shorts. RUN to get this film! In a pivotal scene, Isabella is announcing her contest on the radio, and looking straight in the camera, she slowly and seriously utters the following line in her unique Swedish/Italian accent: “If you’re sad…and like beer…I’m your lady!”

http://dannymiller.typepad.com/blog/2005/01/queen_isabella.html



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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
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« Reply #803 on: November 10, 2007, 03:58:47 PM »

The commentary on each act is almost as good as the idea for the movie.  For example, when the Siamese flute player takes the stage, "No one can beat the Siamese when it comes to dignity, cats, or twins." 


But for true sadness, it's hard to beat the image of Gavrillo's son's heart preserved in a brine of his tears.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #804 on: November 10, 2007, 04:58:28 PM »



Chester Kent: "Sadness is just happiness turned on its ass."

So many good "one-liners" and campy off-the-cuff asides...

I put the sub-titles on to catch them they're so fast...

TSSITW can be a depressing Great Depression melodrama...

even with its satire and gallows-humor.

Different than Carnivàle (2003) in many ways...

Perhaps a more sophisticated euro-magic realism?

I wonder what sense of humor will be with us when...

the so-called New Depression much-discussed on the Internet

comes down with the stock market, dollar-collapse, housing market and

derivatives crash and all the other doomsday stuff on the blogs?

Personally, I plan to join a traveling carnival as the Penguin Boy.

Or maybe the Bearded Lady?
  Smiley Smiley Smiley

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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
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« Reply #805 on: November 10, 2007, 07:24:08 PM »

Which is more absurd?  The countess's beer glass legs or the victory slide?  Who could think of these things?

But did you notice the scenes where Maddin uses color?  It's almost as if he wants to bring death out of the ordinary realm of sadness by giving it an extra dimension.


I think if I were to join a Carnival I'd have to be Chick.  Powers that rise to the level of the super-hero cloaked in the respectability of  "normal." 
« Last Edit: November 10, 2007, 07:28:33 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #806 on: November 10, 2007, 07:45:12 PM »


Which is more absurd?  The countess's beer glass legs or the victory slide?  Who could think of these things?


Village Voice

Sad Songs Say So Much
Prosthetics and Process: A Shooting Journal
by Guy Maddin
May 7 - 13, 2003

"DAY FOUR Jody says we have to suck it up and film Isabella ourselves, just like other film crews do. I know I'll thank him for this edict someday, but I sure didn't like his bossy tone this morning. Eventually, we warmed to the day's work, mostly because we were wondering how to amputate Isabella's legs on film. Eschewing digital effects as grotesque artifacts of the present, we had all sorts of Méliès-era tricks up our sleeves, but no one knew how they would turn out. Eventually, in a way I cannot under my producer's gag order reveal, we removed her gams and replaced them with beer-filled, glass prosthetics, as per the script. Remembering that her famous father, Roberto, used to direct inexperienced actors by tying string to their toes and tugging whenever it was their turn to speak, I had Larry and Speedy tie a little fishing line to Isabella's glass toe. I felt this filament somehow tethered me across time and through his daughter to the father of neorealism. I was instantly pebbled with goose bumps. I delighted in pulling at this thing to make her kick at me over and over while Luc filmed. I guess I did it too much, though, because soon the beer in the long glass legs started churning up and spilled up a yeasty froth over her garters and into her lap. Speedy daubed away at the extraneous head, according to him one of the worst cases he'd ever seen. Why does directing make me despair so much!!!"

http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0319,maddin,43873,20.html
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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #807 on: November 10, 2007, 08:18:20 PM »


Lovely Isabella!  Radiant as ever. Thanks, puget.  I will have to keep my eye out (or maybe I should say leg out) for the movie. They had Blue Velvet on Lithuanian TV last night.

Village Voice

Velvet Underworld
David Lynch's traumatizing neo-noir masterpiece turns 20
by Guy Maddin
February 28th, 2006 12:47 PM

"The last real earthquake to hit cinema was David Lynch's Blue Velvet —I'm sure directors throughout the film world felt the earth move beneath their feet and couldn't sleep the night of their first encounter with it back in 1986—and screens trembled again and again with diminishing aftershocks over the next decade as these picture makers attempted to mount their own exhilarating psychic cataclysms. But no one could quite match the traumatizing combination of horrific, comedic, aural, and subliminal effects Lynch rumbled out in this masterpiece—not even Lynch himself in the fun-filled years that followed before he recombined with himself to invent The Straight Story and Mulholland Drive."

http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0609,maddin,72351,20.html


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“Other people's obsessions
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #808 on: November 10, 2007, 09:09:52 PM »



Village Voice

Velvet Underworld
David Lynch's traumatizing neo-noir masterpiece turns 20
by Guy Maddin
February 28th, 2006 12:47 PM

"But perhaps it is Isabella Rossellini's femme fatale Dorothy Vallens that is Blue Velvet's greatest gift to posterity. Director and neophyte actress collaborated to retool the old genre's often stock figure, to deglamorize and humiliate the supermodel, to knead her pulpy nakedness into a bruise-colored odalisque of inseminated sensualities and untrusting ferocity. There is something sharply porno-entomological, something of the implacable godless terror with which insects mate and devour, and something terrifyingly true, in the bearing of this bravely performed character. Nuns at Rossellini's old high school in Rome held a series of special masses for her redemption after the release of this film—still a hilarious, red-hot poker to the brain after 20 years. A new print has been struck for the special anniversary two-week run at Film Forum."
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“Other people's obsessions
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #809 on: November 11, 2007, 01:25:47 AM »


Guy Maddin

Village Voice

Sad Songs Say So Much
Prosthetics and Process: A Shooting Journal
by Guy Maddin
May 7 - 13, 2003

DAY FOUR For years, I've been meaning to put into practice my Anatomy of Melancholy approach to directing. And now I finally get to! Having already copied out on index cards various descriptions of depression gleaned from Burton's ancient tomes, as well as some 40 synonyms for sadness culled from a thesaurus, I now start each day by dealing out all 52 cards, face down, on the breakfast table full of actors who are to work that day. Each performer has a different, sometimes fuzzy idea of a word's meaning—for instance, lugubrious or throboxyc, which is sadder? Actors love restrictions, and why not restrict them in the only fair way possible: with a lottery windfall of commands drawn randomly from a reference book?

The results have been sensational. The trite and the clichéd don't stand a chance under such an acting system. Dialogue clunks from one line to the next with a fragile-X clumsiness, scenes unfold with a Ritalin-thirsty zing! Most importantly, the work done is in the same tenor as my planned super-primitive rip-and-paste editing style. I want to unlearn how to watch movies; I want to flip dyslexically the images of my film to jangle their readability for the viewers; I want to re-create the thrill I felt as a boy when I finally recognized three words in a row!

http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0319,maddin,43873,20.html


____

Madden writes well; differently than Lynch. A different sense of humor. The way he plays with language, e.g. lugubrious & throboxyc as variations on the movie's theme-word 'sadness' is interesting...as well as the song lyrics etc. Of course, the bottom line is seeing the movie...a couple of times to catch the quick dialog...
« Last Edit: November 11, 2007, 01:27:46 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
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