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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1305 on: June 04, 2008, 01:59:58 AM »

Have you seen The Charles Bukowski Tapes? It's 4 hours long with 52 segments of Bukowski reading his poems
and discussing the world in the fascinating way he does. I've got most of his Black Sparrow books & the recent
collected verse. It really helps to hear a poet read his work... that way when you read it yourself you'll hear
his Voice...

Then there's the Matt Dillon version of Bukowski's Factotum which isn't bad. In fact it's very good. Especially
the beginning & ending. Again seeing a writer's novel on the screen helps to visualize what he went thru. Dillon
does a pretty good job doing the downbeat poet thing, i.e., nothing is more important than Writing!!!
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1306 on: June 04, 2008, 03:17:02 AM »

I have the Bukowski Tapes but haven't gotten around to watching them.  My wife isn't a very big fan of Bukowski, even though she liked Barfly.  His book, Hollywood, on the making of the movie was great fun to read.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1307 on: June 07, 2008, 03:26:55 AM »



DRIVE IN MOVIES

The Creature From the Black Lagoon (1954)

“I'm livin' in shame”
—The Supremes,
“I’m Living in Shame”

Shame is like a rose—a deep dark red blushing rose—yes Shame is like a rose—you know like Gertrude Stein’s rose—the Rose that’s a Rose that’s a Rose—and that Rose was my Rose all the way—the Rose that was a Rose that was a Rose—that’s the way it is with Roses—and that’s the way it is with Shame—there’s many kinds of Shame—as many kinds of Shame as there are shades of Red—shades of moody Mauve—shades of Lipstick Scarlet—shades of pouty Puce—shades of ravishing Ruby—all the shades of blushing shameless Shame—the kind of Shame you get to eventually know so well—the kind of Shame that knows you better than you know myself…

The kind of Shame that comes down out of the Shameless Drive In Night Sky—the kind of Shame that’s Moody & Ultra-Blue out there in the Sticks—the Shameless Angel of the Drive In Night—the Drive In Angel of Shame who gives you what you want—Descending from the Starry Night Sky your personal cute Monster of the Id—disguised as a Normal Human Being during the Day—but at Night turning into The Creature From the Black Lagoon—especially on Saturday Nights—during Double Creature Feature Movies—there at the Snake Pit Drive In…

I Married a Monster From Outer Space (1958)

“Ain't too proud to beg, sweet darlin—
Please don't leave me girl, don't you go”
—The Temptations,
“Aint Too Proud To Beg”

The shameless Shame that has no Face—the shameless Shame that has No Name—the shameless Shame that only Smirks—the shameless Shame that doesn’t waste any Time—the sullen Telepathic Shame that reads your Mind—the kind of lanky butch naked Shame you can’t help staring at during Intermission—eating your hot-dog & sipping your Orange Crush…

The kind of Arrogant Shame that knocks at your window—the shameless Shame that has Power over you—the shameful Shame on your face—when he says his Girlfriend won’t put out—opening the door & getting in—making your knees weak as you slide down on your Master—getting him off in a Divine Intermission Quickie—the Angel of Shame  teaching you what you already know—the shameless Angel of Shame—turning you into Who You Really Are…

The Prince of Shame who’s Always There—like The Invisble Man—shameless Shiva of Shame—pulling back thru Time—all your pusillanimous Pastlives in a single gulp—the Deep Secret Scarlet Ruby Red Rose Bud that’s you to Bloom—the shy little Rosebud—that makes Orson Welles kick the Bucket—the kind of Shame always niggling in the back of your mind—your Chicken Innocence so full of prissy Pride—so Proud of yourself & full of Lies—so Hoity-Toity & above it all—until the Weekend comes around—and then…

Summer and Smoke (1961)

“Stop! In the Name of Love—
Before you break my Heart!!!”
—The Supremes, “Stop!
In the Name of Love

I’m like poor Alma in Summer and Smoke—poor Geraldine Page the nice innocent Minister’s daughter—in love with no-good Laurence Harvey the rude rowdy Playboy—along with Una Merkel always insidiously hovering around in the tacky background—hen-pecking me with my Closet Case guilt—haunting me & making me feel guilty about everything—until finally one lonely night in the Sunken Garden—Earl Holliman the young Traveling Salesman shows up—and then suddenly Alma doesn’t care anymore…

It’s Shame she wants—and it’s shameless Shame she gets—beyond tacky Pride & prissy Prejudice—it’s pure unadulterated Shame she gets—that’s how Alma’s Angel of Shame treats her—simply shamelessly—and she loves it—it’s about Time her pulsating pussy says—as they both make up for Lost Time…

Earl Holliman making Alma sigh & moan—making her Blush in Shame all night long—Deep down there under the fragrant Forsythia bushes—way down deep there in the dark Sunken Garden—deep down there in the Deep Dark Dingle—where the gushing rushing gurgling Fountain of Youth—shamelessly squirts, oozes & comes—deep inside Alma all the way…

Night of the Iguana (1964)

“Some say it's a sign of weakness—
For a man to beg”
—Four Tops,
“Baby I Need Your Lovin”

Sometimes Shame isn’t an Angel—sometimes he’s Devil’s Food Cake in Disguise—Deep Dark & Chocolate like Night of the Living Dead—Deep Dark & Chocolate like Night of the Iguana—Iguana Love isn’t very Pretty—Iguana Love is awfully louche & Lizardly…

Sometimes you end up like poor blithering idiot Richard Burton—Tied up in a Hammock for the rest of the Lost Weekend—with Ava crooning gently with nice sweet calm lullabies—while her cute dancing Latino Kept Boyz—keep busy doing the Rumba in your face all night long…

I know I’ve been There—the House of Shame—it’s the Story Nobody dares Tell—it’s the Story Nobody wants to Hear—the Shameless Story of my Shameless Fall—the Shameless Night of the Iguana—in the awful House of Shame—the House I grew up in back in Kansas City—in that big old abhorrent Mansion on the Hill—Mommy Dearest my poor shameless Mother—into her Third Marriage & off to Mexico—leaving me with my cute Kid Brother—my young Half-Brother Tyrone—my lanky Mulatto Kid Brother—a moody sophomore in MLK High…

Everytime Tyrone looked at me—he called me “No Good White Trash”—Tyrone had my Number—He knew what I was all about—It was so Embarrassing to be Treated that way—by my own Kid Brother so sullen & hot—Tyrone knew I was gay & that was Bad enough—but knowing I was Queer for him made it even Worse—Tyrone hated my guts & made me feel Ashamed every Minute of my Existence—especially when I got down on my knees in the Shower—and gave him a BJ every night—the more I did him—the more Ashamed I got…


« Last Edit: June 07, 2008, 03:34:57 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #1308 on: June 07, 2008, 02:41:57 PM »

It is interesting to follow your influences here....Faulkner inspired Stein? or the other way around?

As an aside....one of the best ever Mystery Science Theatre episode is the sequel to Creature from the Black Lagoon....Revenge of the Creature.  If you haven't seen MST, this is a great one to see.

Was just on the phone with daughter...apparently they had a tornado last night in Bloomington.  They rehearse from 9am until 10 pm, but always keep an eye on the sky because they have a huge investment in electrical equipment....all the percussion is electric, as well as the keyboards, the amps....but they were looking for lightning and saw the tornado touch down. 

And being a Kansas guy...what do you think you would do?  They rehearse in a schoolhouse on the top of a hill in a very wooded area.  When the tornado came, they decided to drive the show's vans down the hill and back to their hotel rather than looking for shelter where they were. 
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1309 on: June 07, 2008, 08:22:07 PM »


Was just on the phone with daughter...apparently they had a tornado last night in Bloomington.  They rehearse from 9am until 10 pm, but always keep an eye on the sky because they have a huge investment in electrical equipment....all the percussion is electric, as well as the keyboards, the amps....but they were looking for lightning and saw the tornado touch down. 

And being a Kansas guy...what do you think you would do?  They rehearse in a schoolhouse on the top of a hill in a very wooded area.  When the tornado came, they decided to drive the show's vans down the hill and back to their hotel rather than looking for shelter where they were. 


They say the worst thing you can do during a Tornado—is to get in your car or pickup & try to outrun it. Some of them travel over 50 mph—whipping back & forth like a Snake. They can suck you out of your car & they’ll find you miles away in a pasture or cornfield somewhere. People have hidden under overpasses up by the girders—they’ve been sucked out of there & end up miles away in a wheatfield.

That’s why the early settlers there in “Tornado Alley” built root cellars to hide in. That’s the best place—down in your basement. I saw one go overhead—up inside the funnel there were lightening bolts networking with each other like some kind of weird thrilling Plasma Discharge Creature. It reminded me of the Monsters of the Id from Forbidden Planet…like those photos of Argentine volcanic lightening on the Net. It's very scary & awe-inspiring...

It dwarfs my so-called hoity-toity “literary ego.” 

Big Time


   
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« Reply #1310 on: June 07, 2008, 10:21:49 PM »

hey....I want a literary hoity-toity attitude.  Where do I sign up?    Kiss

We had a tornado come through here a few years back, tore out most of the trees in our neighborhood.  The houses did all right because most here are build out of brick.  Not so good for roofs, though.  But I saw the beginning of the thing and it was phenomenal.  The sky went from a fair blue to a deep Atlantic Ocean green in probably fifteen minutes.  And the wind picked up from a dead calm.  Went to my basement at that point, but these things make clear just how we overuse the word "awesome."

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1311 on: June 07, 2008, 10:23:17 PM »

Faulkner, Stein, Bukowski, Crumb


It is interesting to follow your influences here....Faulkner inspired Stein? or the other way around?



Yes, Hoffman—as a music teacher you can see my concern with “technique.” Imho understanding POMO Lit means first reading & understanding Modernists like Faulkner & Stein.

So back in Fiction—we spent a lot of time getting into Faulkner’s TSATF, Absalom, Absalom, "Delta Autumn" and The Wild Palms (in regard to Borges’ translation & the difference between Borges’ ‘magic realist’ concept of time & Faulkner’s more static definition of time.

What is time?—the Modernists seem obsessed with it & how to compose with it or thru it or despite it or around it. So after reading/writing thru Faulkner/Borges, I stumbled onto Hart Crane’s The Bridge & his anti-mythic way of writing his American epic. Reading Reed’s book on Crane—I got into the Sapphic Modernists like Stein, Djuna Barnes & Mina Loy.

Back then Paris was a Woman—and these Modernist woman writers were working with Time among other things. Each in their own way—so I studied their techniques & posted my modest imitations. Reading isn’t enough—one has to write your way thru them too. My spin/slant is/was my GLBTQ voice, i.e., appropriating & transgressing their style into my style making their voice mine & relevant to me.

For example, Faulkner’s long almost mile-long sentences. And the way TSATF is broken up—all sorts of ways. Like the Benjie dialog at the beginning—Faulkner talks about technique—especially very succinctly in his Introduction (1946) to TSATF beginning with this sentence: “I wrote this book and learned how to read.”

Stein wrote about writing too—books & essays like How Writing Is Written, "Composition as Explanation" & even within her compositions she’s both writing & thinking about writing at the same time. Her style evolves—from schematicized character typologies to verbal portraits free of temporal narrative & conventional syntax/grammars. We’ve been discussing in Stein-L her anti-detective story “Blood on the Dining Room Floor” which has no linear development, no real murder scenario, no nothing compared with Poe or Raymond Chandler.

So that Drive In Movies is, as you noticed, a mind-meld morph-job using Stein-Faulkner writing techniques for my own nefarious conniving louche literary purposes, i.e. doing what all writers do: stealing from other writers to get a royalty check. To pay the bills & keep the paper moving.

Bukowski & R. Crumb—dzimas & I are into them too. Their techniques are relevant as well. Like Lynch with Eraserhead, Inland Empire & Mulholland Drive—it’s all a matter of experimenting with technique.

And occasionally emitting a vacuous blurb like this inane message.


 Cool Cool Cool


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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1312 on: June 07, 2008, 11:59:05 PM »



Revenge of the Creature (1954)


As an aside....one of the best ever Mystery Science Theatre episode is the sequel to Creature from the Black Lagoon....Revenge of the Creature.  If you haven't seen MST, this is a great one to see.


Talk about déjà vu flashback & chicken nostalgia…

Summer matinees in the dark balcony of the air-conditioned Granada Theater—always such a luxury back then—especially with horror movies like The Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954).

And now all these years later—I’ve got the Universal boxed-set including the sequels Revenge of the Creature (1955) & The Creature Walks Among Us (1956).



Isn’t John Bromfeld goodlooking? Here he is with John Agar & Lori Nelson in Revenge. You can imagine how a little fag like me—fell in love with Bromfeld. I sat thru that movie I don’t know how many times—ogling at him in his speedo. I guess that makes me a queer cineaste—because that’s how I’ve been moviegoing for years.

I remember setting in a New Orleans porno theater forever just to see Alain Delon in Purple Noon (1960) a second time. The regular porno show interludes were very boring—but I came back to life with Alain Delon on the screen. It coincides with a certain absurd surrealistic obsession point I read about with Breton & Co about movies as libidinal sublimation (dark theaters) and all that. What it meant to me was watching Delon in no matter how bad a movie like The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1964), Once a Thief (1965), Texas Across the River (1966) & Zorro (1975)—as well as good ones like The Leopard (1963), Le Samouraï (1967) & The Assassination of Trotsky (1967). Altogether 89 films… But that’s another story.

I guess I was a queer cineaste back then. Full of Juvenile Psychosexual Retardation & Nascent Homosexual Voyeurisme?

The reason I say that is I was thinking last night why Drive In Movies like The Creature of the Black Lagoon still appeal to me—surely it isn’t Alain Delon Male Beauty a la the scaly Creature.

I mean John Bromfeld is nice—but surely my DVD Blaxploitation Horror Teenage Sexploitation Movie collection isn’t based on just that?

Surely it’s more hoity-toity than that? How about the Creature being the Penultimate Existential Outsider—misunderstood by both men & women, driven into Exile by Angst & Weltschmertz, the epitome of Anti-Hero Creepazoid Existence?

Does that sound hoity-toity enough?*

_________

“Among the Stein papers is a review of Finnegans Wake by Oliver St. John Gogarty from The Observer of 7 May 1939. A marked passage insists that Joyce’s style began in resentment at feeling driven out as an artist. “Thus the style had its beginnings in resentment, and its precedents in Lewis Carroll and Gertrude Stein, who was first, so far as I know, in her “Portrait of Mabel Dodge,” to strive for a new effect from the contortions of grammar and syntax.” Did Stein feel driven out of america, as Joyce felt driven out of Ireland, by language gone stiff and dead—whet she called associative language, used from unthinking habit? She declined to observe rules and composed each piece as a new experiment in how to write.”—Ulla Dydo, Stein: A Reader, Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1993.


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Dzimas
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« Reply #1313 on: June 08, 2008, 12:08:55 PM »

It seems a movie like The Creature from the Black Lagoon combines both the atomic age in terms of mutants and men's adventure magazines in terms of mysogeny and soft porn.  A winning combination at the box office.



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Dzimas
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« Reply #1314 on: June 08, 2008, 12:16:53 PM »

On a different note, there were all those shameless drive-in soft porn movies like The Little Cigars Mob,



and the more blunt Russ Meyer flicks like Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!



You have to love the kinetic energy of the trailer,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSdtmHhZd0I

I don't think Tarantino has anything over this movie.
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« Reply #1315 on: June 11, 2008, 03:19:59 PM »

Just saw Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast....what do you think?  Shame, the other....
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1316 on: June 12, 2008, 12:27:13 AM »

I love Cocteau's The Beauty and the Beast.  Truly a poetic vision.  [spoiler] Loved the ending when Belle says he loved the prince better as the beast.
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« Reply #1317 on: June 12, 2008, 12:29:07 AM »

Yes...poetic is a good way to describe it.  I love Cocteau's use of light and shadow, too.

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Dzimas
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« Reply #1318 on: June 12, 2008, 11:26:09 AM »

On a less poetic note, I got a kick out of watching Faster Pussycat.  It was more an erotically-charged action-adventure movie than it was soft-porn, with Tura Satana hamming it up as Varla.  She and Haji had a decidedly evil "Russian" character to them, while Billie, the blonde bombshell, seemed odd girl out.  The camera work was surprisingly good and the movie had a good pace.  A cut above the B-movie fare of its day.

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« Reply #1319 on: June 14, 2008, 02:38:32 AM »

Never on Sunday arrived in the mail today,



I think I'll watch it tomorrow.
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