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Author Topic: Three Thugs and a Stamp Collection  (Read 191 times)
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« on: October 05, 2007, 06:53:43 AM »

Three Thugs and a Stamp Collection
     


Despite some passages that crackle with original life, ?Mauritius? mostly has the ersatz air of an expertly drawn blueprint on tracing paper.
     

http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/10/05/theater/reviews/05maur.html?ex=1349323200&en=f07d3b3ab4245c31&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss
     
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law120b
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2007, 12:04:17 PM »

don'r waste your time or money on this. 
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madupont
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« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2007, 03:26:53 PM »

Weekend 
 
 
The "Six Characters in Search of an Author" at People's Light & Theatre are played by  Stephen Novelli, Kim Carson, Evan Jonigkeit, Julia Giampietro, Ceal Phelan and Connor Murtag
         
Posted on Fri, Oct. 19, 2007

Pirandello polished up to modern gleam
By Howard Shapiro

Inquirer Staff Writer

The director, on the stage of People's Light & Theatre Company in Malvern, is fed up with his charges, so he threatens to send them to another local theater - the Arden, or the Wilma, maybe. The players themselves need a break - they have to choose a union rep, it's Actors' Equity rules. Then one character, dressed as an early-20th-century brothel owner, barges in the door and beelines to the director, demanding to know whether he's a pimp.
He straightens stiffly in umbrage. "I am the director of this theater, madam."

She backs off, delighted. "Good!" she concurs. "A pimp!"

This is Italian master Luigi Pirandello's fascinating 1921 study of illusion and reality, Six Characters in Search of an Author, in an extraordinary new translation by Louis Lippa, People's Light playwright in residence. Director Ken Marini has given Lippa's script a production to match, and assembled a cast that renders the play with breathless clarity - as Pirandello wrote it, and also as Lippa rethought it.

In the playbill credit, Lippa is said to have "translated and freely adapted" Six Characters, but the freely isn't really necessary.

The widely available English version of the play, which performer and theater scholar Eric Bentley translated from the Italian in 1970, contains Pirandello's many verbal flourishes, as well as his complex arguments about what is acting and what is real life. Lippa has removed much of the stylish language and replaced it with smart, updated English that fully respects Pirandello's wit and carefully follows his intellectual pathways; this version lacks for nothing.

And like the original, Lippa's Six Characters shamelessly manipulates emotions. It can be heartbreaking, or startling, or (most often) very funny. It all begins as a rehearsal for one play, when a family of six fully costumed characters appears at the stage door, begging for entry. They are not people, or actors, they are characters, and not fully drawn; their playwright has abandoned his project - and them.

They are stuck in their half-constructed plot, pure emotion with just a back story and no future. They need a full plot and an ending.

The cast and stagecrafters become transfixed. Is the characters' half-story workable as a fully realized play? Can the actors really work with these characters, who have no means to interpret anything other than the strictly defined bits they know of themselves?

"I am fixed," one character tries to explain to the director. "You change, but a character always remains the same."

It's not just theater-talk, it's a discussion about motivation and interpretation in general - with Steven Novelli, Kim Carson, Peter DeLaurier, Ceal Phelan, Marcia Saunders and other (real) actors who bring it off as if they were born to it. This Six Characters may be newly re-crafted, but it's the genuine article.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Six Characters in Search of an Author
Written by Luigi Pirandello, and translated and adapted by Louis Lippa. Directed by Ken Marini, set by Arthur R. Rotch, costumes by Marla J. Jurglanis, lighting by Dennis Parichy, sound Charles T. Brastow. Presented by People's Light & Theatre.

The cast: Stephen Novelli (Father), Kim Carson (Stepdaughter), Peter DeLaurier (The Director), Ceal Phelan (Mother), Evan Jonigkeit (Son), Marcia Saunders (Madame Pace), Connor Murtagh (Young Boy), Julia Giampietro (Little Girl). The on-stage actors and crew: Cathy Simpson, Kevin Bergen, Melanye Finister, Gregory Scott Miller, Elena Bossler, Matt Mezzacappa, Mark Del Guzzo.

Playing at People's Light, 39 Conestoga Rd., Malvern, through Nov. 4. Tickets: $29-$48. Information: 610-644-3500, www.peopleslight.org.


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madupont
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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2007, 03:31:42 PM »

They probably should have stuck with Eric Bentley.
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2007, 10:38:31 PM »

I was going to post this in music but was afraid it might unsettle too many who have acquired definite tastes.  Since this seems to indicate it will be a road show, a tour of one, it can safely be said right here.

Silence of the Lambs actor Sir Anthony Hopkins  is to make a world tour next year as a concert pianist, playing mostly his own compositions. The 70-year-old Welshman originally intended to make music his career, and won a scholarship to the Welsh College of Music and Drama in cardiff because of his piano playing.  (Sunday Times)

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article2983837.ece

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madupont
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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2007, 02:00:31 AM »

Jeff Goldblum and Laura Michelle Kelly join Kevin Spacey for David Mamet’s Speed-the-Plow.

 

Hollywood producers Bobby Gould (Jeff Goldblum) and Charlie Fox (Kevin Spacey) engage in a witty verbal boxing match. Should Gould put on another bad blockbuster that will make his fortune, or put himself on the line for an adaptation of a spiritual, apocalyptic novel offered to him by his beautiful secretary (Laura Michelle Kelly)?

 

Mamet’s witty, caustic play is filled with his trademark rapid-fire dialogue satirising the deal-making that goes on behind-the-scenes in the movie business.

 

For more information, click here

 

From 1 February to 26 April 2008

12 weeks only

 

Book now by calling 0870 060 6628

Book online at www.oldvictheatre.com

 

The Old Vic nominated for whatsonstage Theatregoers choice awards

 

We are very proud to announce that we have been nominated for eight whatsonstage Theatregoers choice awards including Best Actor for Robert Lindsay in The Entertainer, Best Supporting Actress for Diana Rigg in All About My Mother and Pam Ferris in The Entertainer, and Best Supporting Actor for Mark Gatiss in All About My Mother.

 

These awards are the only major awards voted for by the theatre-going public, so to see the complete list, and to vote for us, please click here.

 

To book for any performance at The Old Vic please call 0870 060 6628 or visit www.oldvictheatre.com

 

The Aditya Mittal tickets for under 25s 100 £12 tickets are available for every performance at The Old Vic. Tickets can be purchased in advance, but must be collected from the Box Office with proof of age. Please phone 0870 060 6628 for more details.
 
Take advantage of priority booking, reduced priced preview tickets, special offers, no booking fees and more by becoming a Friend of The Old Vic.
 
Find out more about access at The Old Vic
 

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law120b
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« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2007, 12:58:10 PM »

saw it in original run on broadway, with madonna as the female lead.  loved it.
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madupont
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« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2007, 11:47:29 AM »

I vaguely remember that.  Mamet is the kind of a playwright that you want to like; to hear him talk, in his intellectual mode, although he is a bit off-putting seen in person, you think this guy is really smart. His plays, even on film seldom match up to what you might expect with the exception of one with a title that I can't recall. Shall look for it, however,because it was kind of good on upper-class intellectual families and the kind of psychological baggage that are the consequence. Now, watch, if and when I find it, it will turn out to be not his fault.

As for Madonna,I was able to put up with all her latest tricks until the last I saw of her in abbreviated Madonnasized uniforms, you know, camouflage fatigues,etc. still doing her Madonna on the Cross routine; this was on television. And, I thought, oh, my god, she's trying to keep up with Sean Penn and do something "public spirited" (not his words but her mind-set, if you get my drift) to protest the War. Huh?

That's when I'd had it.

(Although, you know, it was a little bit like she never got over the insult that Marlena Dietrich paid her for having the chutzpah to compare herself to the great star of film,stage comeback to Las Vegas,and of course her WW2 tours for the troops.  Madonna is not ever going to have a funeral with the turn-out that Dietrich had when she was returned to Berlin where she was born. It is a toss-up, however, I'm not sure how the stats compare between Dietrich and Edith Piaf.)
« Last Edit: December 13, 2007, 11:50:02 AM by madupont » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2007, 12:12:48 PM »

Law120b,

I couldn't find it; which would indicate that it is not him who wrote the play that I'm thinking about. On the other hand it is relatively mind-blowing how many films he has written and/or directed. I think in the latter case, because he wrote it and insisted on directing it. He even wrote a Hannibal(Lecter, that is).  And in almost all cases, I liked his films.

When I looked this up, I was a little surprised to find he had been " a waiter at Second City Theatre, in  Chicago". On the other hand, his plays are the kind of plays they liked to do at the Steppenwolf Theatre as I recall.
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law120b
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« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2007, 04:31:39 PM »

without an imdb look-up:  spanish prisoner, house of games, glengarry glen ross, speed-the-plow, some trilogy i saw on broadway years back on a guy coming home to chicago, with whatsername playing his sister, and the one off-broadway with his wife as the "victim" of a professor's alegged gender-driven harassment....

both what he says and how he says it are sources of endless joy to me.
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madupont
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« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2007, 07:44:07 PM »

Law120b

Yes,yes,yes; then I have to guess,although I RECOGNIZE  the name of Speed the Plow, I can't remember the plot; and the last is Oleanna which is so exasperating it drives you right up the wall. I saw it on tv, and it might as well be Husband and Wife, or any Male and Female, in fact -- come to think of it somebody in these forums has been pulling that ....on me.    Oleanna is one of those conundrums that is almost cliche and I suspect Mamet is himself like that which is why I said he is so "off-putting". You forgot a few:

State and Main,[ which I found hilarious, I've had experiences like that from both ends of the business, in fact it was quite embarrassing to me to do as a fan what I detest fans doing as I observe them doing from the point of view on the professional end, like being a misused gopher;but, then the true professional as I've observed never lets on but just graciously accepts the flattery of the fan while flattering the fan graciously.  I give much thanks where credit is due, to my son who calls me on it and quietly lectures me sotto voce when I have acted like a prima donna. I'm afraid that i'm like a cat, just lapping up compliments and then if someone riles my feathers(talk about mixed metaphor),I hiss, and claw and...cats don't quite snarl, they give warning sounds or they roar].

Lansky. Must see "Jewish Mafia". My great-aunt's husband was a Chicago man who came from the Lower East side after getting off the ship.

Black Widow.  This is all time great Debra Winger stuff.

Come to think of it, Mamet knows a hell of a lot about the mob.
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« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2007, 07:07:20 PM »

Terence Howard is about to be Brick (which once was Paul Newman's hard-drinking short-tempered not easily tempted performance; and, I wish that I paid closer attention to that, as in, "let that be a warning".)in
Tennessee Williams',Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Opening: Feb. 12 at the Broadhurst Theatre    Tickets go on sale Dec.29.

Since I saw this film in maybe 1958 or much later on  tv, because I can't imagine how I packed so much into  one year, I had to wrack my brains for more than a minute who played Big Daddy? ( who had the last word on mendacity, for you out there,"let that be a warning") Burl  Ives, who lived as far South as Illinois, but I don't care. Having seen James Earl Jones play Paul Robeson, it would be something to see him deliver these lines that Ives made famous.   And that's all I'm going to tell you. You can take a vote for yourselfs who gets to be Maggie?  Any ideas?
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