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Author Topic: Film Trivia  (Read 7458 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #45 on: November 25, 2007, 12:24:59 AM »



Quote
I am however shook to realize that the character Jack played in   Heartburn  was/is Carl Bernstein who "could have sex with a Venetian blind".


If Bernstein had any input into the movie of Heartburn, I'd have thought it was a case of wishful casting, kind of like Robert Redford as Bob Woodward in All the President's Men.  You know, the scenario of "Oh, no -- Hoffman played me once, now I want to be studly."  Given the subject of the movie, maybe Bernstein signed a conditional release; that is, as long as his character was more hot than schlubby, Ephron could go ahead with the movie and not face any defamation suits. 


Were you referring to this:"Greg Norman, the Australian golfing legend, is heading back to court just weeks after his multi-million dollar divorce from Laura Andrassy. This time, Norman is suing Andrassy for allegedly violating a confidentially agreement that she would not talk publicly about his affair with Chris Evert, the tennis star, which broke up the marriage."

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harrie
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« Reply #46 on: November 25, 2007, 09:58:46 AM »

madupont, I've seen that; but I was referring generally to the situation when real people are being portrayed in film, and they wish/demand a certain actor, or list of acceptable actors, portray them or they will refuse to cooperate with the production. 

Back to All the President's Men as an example -- Dustin Hoffman as Carl Bernstein = not that far off the mark.  Robert Redford as Bob Woodward = in your dreams, Bob Woodward.  Personally, I'd have picked James Woods.

Other example - Julia Roberts as Erin Brockovich, sort of.  Ms. Brockovich is a nice-looking older woman with a well-traveled face, but she's played as a significant number of years younger with a megawatt smile and big hair.  But then, Julia Roberts doesn't (or didn't, anyway) have the Brockovich cleavage, so it's a tradeoff, I guess.   If I knew what Jeffrey Wigand looked like, I'd compare/contrast him to Russell Crowe. 

I get the poetic license thing, and that dramatic films portraying real-life events aren't documentaries so things will be different.  And I also know that the Redford and Roberts roles were probably cast based on box-office potential rather than anyone having a hissy fit.  Basically, I was joking and having fun at Bernstein's expense, imagining the scenario where he holds Heartburn hostage unless he's played by a sexy rather than schlumpy guy.

And I always told my mother that Little Chrissy Evert wasn't the nice girl she thought.....

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madupont
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« Reply #47 on: November 25, 2007, 12:14:08 PM »

harrie,

I'm laughing because Heartburn's "Bernstein" aka Jack Nicholson was already fast on his way to becoming that schlumpy guy that he became.

I do not doubt that this particular casting kept Streep on her toes to remain one jump ahead of Jack on the set and at all times.
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madupont
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« Reply #48 on: November 25, 2007, 04:46:32 PM »

Dzimas
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/23/movies/23paso.html?ref=movies

Understanding Pasolini by Revisiting His Movies.
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madupont
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« Reply #49 on: November 25, 2007, 04:53:03 PM »

http://www.pasolininewyork.com/

Pier Paolo Pasolini.
Poet of Ashes
Cinema  Exhibitions
Lectures  Music  Theater
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jbottle
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« Reply #50 on: November 25, 2007, 10:37:50 PM »

Speaking of Carl Bernstein "would fuck a 'Venetian' blind, you know, as long as she had 'papers,' owwwww," no there was that awful joke that the only difference between Nicholson and Beatty is that Beatty woudn't **** "cold mud."
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Dzimas
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« Reply #51 on: November 26, 2007, 11:34:32 AM »

How'd we end up going down this path in Holiday movies?
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harrie
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« Reply #52 on: November 26, 2007, 11:44:01 AM »

Don't look at me, Nora Ephron started it!

Does anyone remember The Christmas That Almost Wasn't?  I didn't see it as a child, but I vividly remember the commercials.  Paul Tripp says "Santa, you're early."  And Santa responds, in a voice full of doom, " Christmas isn't coming this year."  WHAT??  To put this in context, I was about five. 

I do believe it had a happy ending, but I was afraid of being scarred for life, so I never watched it to find out.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 11:58:48 AM by harrie » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #53 on: November 26, 2007, 12:24:59 PM »

Dzimas,  something even better than....

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/25/movies/25raff.html?ref=movies

Master of Doomed Love and Dark Surprises
By TERRENCE RAFFERTY

Max Ophuls, the itinerant auteur, is the subject of a retrospective at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

As I began looking at the titles of his films, one by one and turning to the reviews listed under Max Ophuls at nytimes.com, I was surprised at how many of his films that I've seen in my lifetime, we practically grew up on them at a certain period in history that had to do with WW2,and I was also shocked at how I had forgotten over time that I had seen these films when I recognized the plots,the stars, and the adaptations for projects. I could vaguely make out the the scenes as I'd originally seen them; like this one:
http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F06E2DB153AE53BBC4851DFB366838F649EDE

Here is the complete list of his filmography from 1958 back to 1932.
http://movies.nytimes.com/person/105103/Max-Oph-ls/filmography
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 12:28:44 PM by madupont » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #54 on: November 26, 2007, 12:45:20 PM »

Sorry about that second link, but if you go to the Filmography link, just click on any film title and it will take you to the review. pretty sure it was  Le Plaisir,   in which the Madame of the brothel, in typical de Maupassant style, takes the girls for an outing in the country to the first communion of her niece...

But I also recall watching Louis Jourdan play the piano in --
Letter from an Unknown Woman         

(a plot which in those days would have mystified any teen ager)
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madupont
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« Reply #55 on: November 26, 2007, 01:01:47 PM »


Speaking of Carl Bernstein "would fuck a 'Venetian' blind, you know, as long as she had 'papers,' owwwww," no there was that awful joke that the only difference between Nicholson and Beatty is that Beatty woudn't **** "cold mud."



Listen, I caught a few scenes last night from    The Departed
(a film which I had seen previously) and I had a hard time backing away from the tv set, I'd stand up to leave because I was cleaning up dinner but I could not tear myself away.

There something about the syncopation (the rhythm of this film)of the timing, which is not only Matt Damon's dialogue but the entirety of the film and the great background music of the sound track that draws you in and holds you there.

My jaw dropped however when I realized, that although I'd been watching Nicholson go through his routines over the years to get this way, that if I eliminated his brilliant scatalogical improv, which I wouldn't, the attitude in which it was delivered and his technique of being himself was utterly identical to my youngest brother who himself is departed now for several years. The resemblence had escaped me up until now because I couldn't yet deal with it.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #56 on: November 26, 2007, 03:45:00 PM »

Holiday movies....Brazil.  Nothing says Christmas like the cozy family gathered about the telly and the tree, little girl asks mum how santa can get in without a chimney....and we're off.  Sure beats the preachy feel-good attempts at conveying the "Christmas" we've been treated to of late.  Somehow the producers of Elf and the like have misread the ovine nature of our society.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 03:51:07 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #57 on: November 26, 2007, 09:35:33 PM »

Maddy, I've been staring at Le Plaisir,

http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/28651/Le-Plaisir/overview

on my Wish List for sometime, but decides to hold off until the new year.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #58 on: November 26, 2007, 09:37:09 PM »

Good call on Brazil, hoffman. 
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barton
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« Reply #59 on: November 27, 2007, 11:25:44 AM »

best Thanksgiving movie:

The New World


A masterpiece of visual art and set creation, with exquisite attention to detail, fine acting, and a love story that makes your heart ache.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
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