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Author Topic: Film Trivia  (Read 9597 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #30 on: November 22, 2007, 05:08:34 PM »

Thirteen years later and no appreciation for...:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0110538/
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harrie
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« Reply #31 on: November 22, 2007, 05:39:43 PM »

I like a lot of the cast -- in fact, I may know one of them, but not well.  But it's a Nora Ephron flick --- is this written like any every other Nora Ephron flick?  (When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, You've Got Mail, etc.) 

I like WHMS and SiS -- but in Sleepless, that's where Nora Ephron's writing, or perhaps her writing coupled with Meg Ryan's interpretation of same, began to bug me.  Some line Ryan says to Bill Pullman is one of those "and that's when I knew that Nora Ephron writes essentially the same movie over and over and over again" moments for me. 

Meanwhile, I'm on the lookout for The Lookout -- hoping to scoop it up while doing some of that fun holiday shopping this weekend.

And I'll be a sap -- The Bishop's Wife, the one with Cary Grant. 
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whiskeypriest
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« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2007, 08:52:12 AM »

C'mon, whisque, time for a critical re-eval, 6.3/10??

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113321/
Couldn't sit through it, myself.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #33 on: November 23, 2007, 11:24:00 AM »

I can only imagine bottle is pulling our leg on that one, as Home for the Holidays has to be one of the most insufferable holiday movies ever made.  Almost as bad as Steel Magnolias, which in its epic form seemed to include every holiday, a wedding and a funeral.  A veritable weepfest.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2007, 11:25:45 AM by Dzimas » Logged
harrie
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« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2007, 01:54:44 PM »

I don't mind embarrassing myself, it's nothing new. So I will go ahead and say that there are parts of Home for the Holidays that I actually like.  And some parts that I don't like, too; but I've seen many movies that are much worse. 

And another one of my favorite Christmas movies is The Sure Thing.
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madupont
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« Reply #35 on: November 23, 2007, 04:35:43 PM »

harrie   re:#31

"...that's where Nora Ephron's writing,...began to bug me."   It happened to me long after I saw the movie with Jack Nicholson about her divorce from same, as husband to perhaps Meryl Streep; too long ago to remember the details but it was a movie of "her story", the equivalent of saying "gotcha" because she was in a position to do so.

 But, the bug came after,now that she was a public celebrity.  She was an interesting and snappy writer of fiction and memoir, but one day I left the tv tuned to a channel a moment too long because my mind was dialoging with Self along the lines of,"oh, that's Nora Ephron who is about to be interviewed; might as well hear what she is doing."

Wrong.  She opened with something that  made no sense, and the "Barry Nolan" type had to act like it meant something , which only made it more obvious that the audience was not required to get it. Becoming a celebrity  in Lalaland is not the same as having become a celebrated writer who was once very funny with material about that housewifely stuff we know so well. That was when I knew, she had been tapped dry.

Speaking of  When Harry met Sally, I happened to catch Billy Crystal the other night receiving the Mark Twain Award for comedy acting( it was a slow night but, as it turned out, everybody who was anybody was there) and he did a short but appreciated monologue covering his career in less than fifteen minutes  and delivered from "an old rocking chair" (which he happened to whittle himself, along with a number of other things  with which he occupies his time in his really old age as a comic actor who seemed to remain forever young).

This is when I suspect that an intense brunette in the balcony might be his wife. All of his family members who chose to be at this award ceremony were seated in one place together in same balcony. I had begun to notice this very nervous elegant woman who did not feel comfortable being in the public spotlight. He put her at ease at the same moment that the camera had made everybody aware of her; and they did this little dialogue back and forth, all in gestures on her part while he praised her and their marriage because apparently they appear to have one of the few Originals on either coast.

In half an hour the whole broadcast was over, and I was stunned by the people with whom he has worked and whom he knows,and the greats we admire who all are his fans, everyone of whom was standing in  an informal receiving line to take turns hugging him as he exited the stage.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2007, 07:49:08 PM »

Nora Ephron will always be a bit of all right with me because of Silkwood, and there were parts of Heartburn I liked quite well, like hearing Jack Nicholson sing "My Boy Bill"--hee.  I even liked quite a bit of When Harry Met Sally--the old couples made the movie for me, and every so often somebody at our house will channel Billy Crystal's "pepper" bit.

Speaking of Crystal, I heard him last night as Calcifer in Howl's Moving Castle which  kid and I stayed up way late watching--a Miyazaki I'd missed and shame on me.

 
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harrie
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« Reply #37 on: November 23, 2007, 07:55:44 PM »

madupont,
Heartburn was the divorce flick.  I don't think I've seen it, but I read the book, which I liked.  On the one hand, it was sad but funny; but then Ephron would throw in a recipe every once in a while, which I thought was kind of bizarre but a neat coping mechanism. 

The thing with Ephron's movies is, I just get the feeling that with the success of When Harry Met Sally, she just decided  -- or maybe she didn't, since H'wood execs have a tendency of ruining writers -- that since it worked so well, she would just keep writing it over and over, or do variations on a theme.  Then again, I like some other stuff she's written, like Silkwood, My Blue Heaven and even Michael (I know, I know about those last two -- my life is full of guilty pleasures), so I shouldn't be so hard on her.  It's like she's fallen into a rut and can't get up. 

I know Billy Crystal has been married a long time, but I don't know what Mrs. C looks like.  I think he's a better comedic actor than he usually gets credit for.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #38 on: November 24, 2007, 02:44:37 AM »

Quote
The thing with Ephron's movies is, I just get the feeling that with the success of When Harry Met Sally, she just decided  -- or maybe she didn't, since H'wood execs have a tendency of ruining writers -- that since it worked so well, she would just keep writing it over and over, or do variations on a theme.


Ephron is in good company in this regard.  Success can often be a curse.
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madupont
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« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2007, 09:22:10 AM »

Dzimas,

Take Heinrich Mann, for instance. 

I've got some more Weimar material for you; found today. From an interesting area close to where my niece lives in Santa Monica.
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madupont
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« Reply #40 on: November 24, 2007, 09:42:14 AM »

nytempsperdu,re:#36
"Nora Ephron will always be a bit of all right with me because of Silkwood..."


harrie,re:#37
"madupont,
Heartburn was the divorce flick.  I don't think I've seen it, but I read the book, which I liked.  On the one hand, it was sad but funny; but then Ephron would throw in a recipe every once in a while, which I thought was kind of bizarre but a neat coping mechanism."

                                        ~~~

Ephron could be forgiven anything for  Silkwood     It's one of a kind and was perhaps the most proper way to write a film expose of a political subject that's still our current problem.    I was dumb-founded by Cher and really began to appreciate her for the person she is.

I am however shook to realize that the character Jack played in   Heartburn  was/is Carl Bernstein who "could have sex with a Venetian blind". So, if Nora wants to throw in a recipe now and then, who can blame her. We all managed somehow; or: all have to manage somehow?
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harrie
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« Reply #41 on: November 24, 2007, 09:54:22 AM »

Quote
I am however shook to realize that the character Jack played in   Heartburn  was/is Carl Bernstein who "could have sex with a Venetian blind".


If Bernstein had any input into the movie of Heartburn, I'd have thought it was a case of wishful casting, kind of like Robert Redford as Bob Woodward in All the President's Men.  You know, the scenario of "Oh, no -- Hoffman played me once, now I want to be studly."  Given the subject of the movie, maybe Bernstein signed a conditional release; that is, as long as his character was more hot than schlubby, Ephron could go ahead with the movie and not face any defamation suits. 
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madupont
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« Reply #42 on: November 24, 2007, 10:06:27 AM »

Dzimas,

http://www.usc.edu/libraries/archives/arc/libraries/feuchtwanger/


[the inscription below his photo refers to the widow of actor Oskar Homolka]
« Last Edit: November 24, 2007, 10:10:44 AM by madupont » Logged
barton
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« Reply #43 on: November 24, 2007, 11:42:26 AM »

At a family gathering, some genius chose Under the Tuscan Sun as having some kind of theme that related to gathering together and being thankful and so on.  If all one needs to do is sit and digest food, I suppose it's not too terrible, though I'd be happy to never again see Kate Walsh appear as an Asian-American pregant lesbian's girlfriend.  Many aspects of the characters seemed to be derived not from any need to tell us something interesting or pertinent, but because the screenwriter had attended a workshop and taken careful notes on "what makes a well-rounded character." 

The story, a divorced woman on impulse takes off into the wilds of Tuscany and buys a decrepit old villa and olive grove, is supposedly derived from real life, but has the feel more of a divorced woman's daydream -- and it is so steered by this perspective that it seems difficult for anyone who isn't a divorced woman to develop much interest.  It seems all too predictable that she be constantly surrounded by horny Italian (or Polish, in the case of the workmen who restore the place) men and Italian women who contain all the emotional wisdom and/or cooking knowledge of an ancient culture.  Her best woman friend turns out to be the actress who danced in the fountain in La Dolce Vita, and she makes sage pronouncements about enjoying life and seizing the moment.  Whoa, didn't see that coming!

And the number of scenes that resemble Olive Garden commercials?  Well, let's just say that Jbottle could no doubt devise an excellent drinking game....

     
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madupont
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« Reply #44 on: November 24, 2007, 09:59:17 PM »

Barton,
"...takes off into the wilds of Tuscany and buys a decrepit old villa and olive grove, is supposedly derived from real life, but has the feel more of a divorced woman's daydream --"

You got that right. In fact, don't they make these films for that market? As long as you realize that what came before like an episode of American soap was the promise that by fantasizing her way into this film she might meet Jeremy Irons (trying to get into Liv Tyler's pants). I forget just who it was  played the gay divorcee(or, was she the depressed divorcee? I've forgotten. But I can more or less see her face and body type without having the faintest idea of her name or whom she is (which would be about par for the guy who eventually scores).

This tendency to imagine that you can buy a decrepit foreign atmosphere and turn into a love nest with ambience seems to overcome women at -- what the French call-- "a certain age".  These movies tend to cater to what can be either a safely vicarious option, or the last straw at putting ideas into her head. The supposedly derived from real life aspect is conveyed by the proposition that there usually is some charitable impulse to make the whole thing commendable; it is generally of British derivation.  They have been going to Tuscany since long before the Barretts of Wimpole Street and the elopement with Browning. Although there was that mess with Percy Bysshe Shelley, Caroline Lamb, and Lord Byron; who made that film...? The voyeur usually features herself as Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2007, 10:02:35 PM by madupont » Logged
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