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Author Topic: Film Trivia  (Read 9589 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #150 on: January 31, 2008, 12:38:31 PM »


madupont, if you mean in real life, you posted the answer in Celebreality. I'm confused. 

As for the quote, for some reason I hear Bette Davis spitting out the "the rest was just trash" line, but I'm probably projecting.


But, I posted the link in: Movies, particularly for Dzimas because we had been discussing how Julie had done today in comparison to some of the Golden Oldies, some of them I only vaguely remember but he's a real fan of that earlier era.

I was pleasantly surprised that Barton saw the merit to this particular current film; the plot line I had earlier discussed in, Meander While We May which was the original name of the Book Forums at the nytimes.com   When the film came out, Away from Her was featured in The New Yorker magazine, in the short story form that it originally was, by Alice Munro (known as, The Bear Came Over the Mountain).  One of our former nytimes.com posters who occasionally dropped in, taught literature, and had just seen the movie soon after we both joined exiles escape from melba(whatever). So, I asked her, when telling her where the story was presently in print,her impressions of the film since she saw it in Canada, which is the director's home; because I'd be interested in discussing Munro's story.  The story was originally differently presented than what is demanded from film since you have to have "action" for the visual aspects of film, whereas Munro writes an interior monologue style of writing with some sparse dialogue that is her true art. You are reading along and discover that  you've just read a sentence that is shocking; but,furthermore,admittedly you recognize it and that's what pulls you in to the world as Alice Munro has experienced it.

I'd had the interesting experience of being one of about five people discussing her earlier collection of short stories: Runaway  (at the nytimes book forums as a selection of the month); after a couple of unknown letter writers had told The New York Times that they didn't think it should be reviewing her work and giving it publicity, nor should Jonathan Franzen have commended her book in a half page review commentary.   These people found her writing immoral, from their sort of red-state point of view.

I was so furious that I contacted both publishers, of Franzen's work and Alice Munro's  to notify them of this tempest in a teapot (because that sort of outside commentary despite freedom of speech discourages reviews of excellent literature  some people do not politically agree with at all).  But she is currently, one of our best writing women in the English language.  Franzen has gone so far as to consider her stories on the same par as Anton Chekov.

Which means I am very happy to think that Alice is probably receiving some of the royalties made on the movie option to film her simple little short story. There is ever so much more income to be made on the sale to a film production than in having your books published.   

Having a star take up the role makes that all the more possible.  Did you get the impression that Julie may really be feeling "the ravages of Alzheimers" at the SAG Awards ceremony when she got up to accept her award; or, was she just "acting"?  I haven't been able to make up my mind.    Was that what you meant by "the quote". 

(Sixty six is a little bit earlier to be feeling the accumulative effects but it has been known to happen. Take Rita Hayworth.  Some people think it is the hair dye?)
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harrie
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« Reply #151 on: January 31, 2008, 01:16:43 PM »

Sorry, madupont, about attributing the wrong forum. 

Quote
Did you get the impression that Julie may really be feeling "the ravages of Alzheimers" at the SAG Awards ceremony when she got up to accept her award; or, was she just "acting"?  I haven't been able to make up my mind.   


I thought she was just extremely nervous -- it looked like she had note cards and dropped them at the podium.  At first I hated the outfit, but after a minute I thought the pants thing was pretty styling. 
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madupont
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« Reply #152 on: January 31, 2008, 11:20:09 PM »

No problem.   

I know what you mean about the styling. I noticed that as she was walking up to the podium during that long haul; and thought it may have been some refraction of the camera lense causing  a kind of distortion about the motion and her height, but then when she arrived at the podium, nothing of that oddity was apparent.

But it is indicative of the problems that you discover as you change age and don't notice which things are changing about yourself until they become obvious. I gather it hits at different ages for different people
because I felt quite distressed the first time that I discovered I was picking clothes that were/had been the right style for me and suddenly shockingly that was no longer true and I didn't know how to dress anymore.  In fact this continues to go on and you have to try to keep up with it.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #153 on: February 01, 2008, 10:33:50 PM »

harrie: Good projection, but not this time.

Barton: "Perk" is good, and sort of appropriate because the line was delivered in a kitchen that was the setting for much of the play/movie, where many exchanges occurred between an older woman, an almost-adolescent girl and her younger friend from next door. One musical number was featured: "His Eye Is On The Sparrow."     
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 10:36:20 PM by nytempsperdu » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #154 on: February 02, 2008, 03:17:09 PM »



Here’s an easy one for you trivia queens—

What famous movie diva looked around the joint and said:

“What a fucking dump!!!”   


 Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 04:57:13 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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madupont
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« Reply #155 on: February 02, 2008, 05:13:23 PM »

I'd have to imagine that was The Women,pugetopolis.

But I have a question to ask nytempsperdu;was that Ethel Waters who happened to be singing?
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madupont
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« Reply #156 on: February 02, 2008, 05:24:10 PM »

Oh,never mind.

Nytempsperdu:

That was Member of the Wedding ,both stage and screen by Carson McCullers, which made me want to act because there was Julie Harris and Brandon de Wilde besides Ethel.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #157 on: February 02, 2008, 08:38:10 PM »

Bingo, madupont!  It didn't make me want to act, did make me want to write and still does make me sing that song.

Another questioner's turn...ooops, I mean "The floor is open."
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madupont
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« Reply #158 on: February 02, 2008, 11:22:00 PM »

That's the funny thing. At the age that this play opened on Broadway or, rather at the age that I was -- I still was not aware of writing.

That is, I read all the time but never thought of it as "writing" until one particular school project in grade school had made me very aware that it was and some people thought that "girls" are not supposed to write. They can do homework but they can't write.  It has to do with something about how any thing a girl would write, would automatically be something not believable in the first place.   I was astounded and humiliated to realize that having done my homework  subjected  your veracity to  derogatory  and demeaning embarrassment.
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madupont
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« Reply #159 on: February 03, 2008, 12:07:04 AM »

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/photo/postphotos/style/2005-02-12/4.htm

1) picture from Member of the Wedding
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #160 on: February 03, 2008, 05:31:01 AM »

That's the funny thing. At the age that this play opened on Broadway or, rather at the age that I was -- I still was not aware of writing.

Things have changed haven't they. You write very well, my dear!

But then something tells me...you were writing well back then too...

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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #161 on: February 03, 2008, 05:34:07 AM »

Can someone guess which movie
this poem was recited in?


How calmly does the olive branch
Observe the sky begin to blanch
Without a cry, without a prayer
With no betrayal of despair

Some time while light obscures the tree
The zenith of its life will be
Gone past forever
And from thence
A second history will commence

A chronicle no longer gold
A bargaining with mist and mold
And finally the broken stem
The plummeting to earth, and then

And intercourse not well designed
For beings of a golden kind
Whose native green must arch above
The earth's obscene corrupting love

And still the ripe fruit and the branch
Observe the sky begin to blanch
Without a cry, without a prayer
With no betrayal of despair

Oh courage! Could you not as well
Select a second place to dwell
Not only in that golden tree
But in the frightened heart of me...


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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #162 on: February 04, 2008, 01:27:30 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSAiFOqCgYc
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #163 on: February 04, 2008, 01:54:29 AM »

Rats!  I knew that one, but wasn't online in the time between posting of question and answer.

On consideration, my days between questions, hints & answers is probably too long a time for a medium of such immediacy (and participants who need not wait for off-work hours) so I'll yield the floor.     

 
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barton
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« Reply #164 on: February 04, 2008, 10:46:59 AM »

I didn't peek at the answer, but my guess is PeeWee's Big Adventure.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
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