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Author Topic: Film Trivia  (Read 9624 times)
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barton
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« Reply #180 on: February 04, 2008, 02:00:33 PM »

OK, I was thinking of another movie.  I tried to reconstruct the fishing trip in my head and it seemed like the boat name made a sort of pun on the nature of their trip, like it was this big adventure....so the boat was something like The Spree or The Jaunt, but that's not exactly it....hmmmmm
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #181 on: February 04, 2008, 02:04:58 PM »

Yeah, the more I think about it, the more this trivia question sucks.  I mean, the name of the boat just is what it is - there's no clue or connection or whatever in/to any of the other questions recently posted. 

I only thought of it because the concepts of "boat names" and "1975 Oscar-nominated movie" went into my head, and out popped the name of the boat in "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest".   I Googled it, and no answer anywhere, so pretty much the only way to get the answer is: (1) to already know it or (2) to watch the movie.

Anyways, if anyone else thinks this question sucks for any of the above-stated reasons or any other reason, then let me know and I'll post the answer and open the floor.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #182 on: February 04, 2008, 02:07:10 PM »

...it seemed like the boat name made a sort of pun on the nature of their trip...

You're getting colder.  I'm not sure what the word means (the boat's name is one word), but I'm guessing it's a reference to something in the region, like geographically or whatever.
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barton
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« Reply #183 on: February 04, 2008, 02:08:35 PM »

Actually, I don't think the question sucks at all because I think I've got it....

RPMc and the inmates go on a lark, and the boat is The Lark.   Right?
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #184 on: February 04, 2008, 02:10:51 PM »

No, but the last letter is correct, as is the number of letters.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #185 on: February 04, 2008, 02:13:47 PM »

nytempsperdu

This was a film however from which I expected great Tennessee Williams type things after all, I held the book as prompter and knew the lines from memory at one time for: Streetcar...

Oh really, my dear? Hmmm, this is getting interesting...

Please, tell us more...

Stella!!!!



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barton
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« Reply #186 on: February 04, 2008, 02:18:20 PM »

Oilcan, I went and pulled my Penguin Classics edition of the novel, on page 207 the boat is identified as The Lark, by its owner, Capt. Block.   So, I guess I confused the book with the film, and the director must have chosen a different boat name for that scene....

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #187 on: February 04, 2008, 02:19:29 PM »

Iguana hit me as a bummer.

Well, my dear, I know exactly how you feel...

Being tied up in a hammock all night long can indeed be a bummer...

Kind of like a straitjacket dontchaknow, honey...
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barton
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« Reply #188 on: February 04, 2008, 02:20:53 PM »

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source - Share This
lark2      /l?rk/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[lahrk] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun 1. a merry, carefree adventure; frolic; escapade. 
2. innocent or good-natured mischief; a prank. 
3. something extremely easy to accomplish, succeed in, or to obtain: That exam was a lark. 
–verb (used without object) 4. to have fun; frolic; romp. 
5. to behave mischievously; play pranks. 
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #189 on: February 04, 2008, 02:26:37 PM »

Oilcan, I went and pulled my Penguin Classics edition of the novel, on page 207 the boat is identified as The Lark, by its owner, Capt. Block.   So, I guess I confused the book with the film, and the director must have chosen a different boat name for that scene....

Oh, nice work.  I'll call that a winner, then.  

In the movie, McMurphy fast-talks the harbor-master into letting them take the boat, although you get the impression that the harbor-master doesn't believe a word of McMurphy's story but doesn't want to mess with a bunch of crazy-looking guys, and you see him picking up the phone as they're pushing off into the harbor, presumably to call the cops or the Coast Guard.   McMurphy, when he's trying to fast-talk the harbor-master, says, "Yeah, we set it up with Captain Block, we've chartered this boat, call Captain Block..." and so forth, so maybe the guy is calling Captain Block.

Anyways, in the movie, the name of the boat is NYAK, but that seems like maybe the name of a river or something like that in the region, or maybe the name of an old chief from the 1800's of some Native American tribe up there in Oregon.  So maybe they just got a local boat for the movie and didn't bother to paint the name "LARK" on the back over "NYAK".  It seems like an easy enough thing to do, but maybe there are maritime rules and regs about that kind of thing.

Whatever the case may be... for getting the correct name of the boat from the book, I say it's your floor.
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barton
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« Reply #190 on: February 04, 2008, 02:35:32 PM »

Astigmatism is a terrible thing.   

Just kidding.  "Nyak" huh?   You didn't see Cuckoo's Nest 100 times, too, did you?

Seriously, what a weird directorial choice, but I guess the pun would sort of get lost in the shuffle in a film, so it probably didn't matter so much what the boat was called.

The floor is open.
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madupont
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« Reply #191 on: February 04, 2008, 02:49:45 PM »


Can someone guess which movie
this poem was recited in?


How calmly does the olive branch
Observe the sky begin to blanch
Without a cry, without a prayer
With no betrayal of despair

Some time while light obscures the tree
The zenith of its life will be
Gone past forever
And from thence
A second history will commence

A chronicle no longer gold
A bargaining with mist and mold
And finally the broken stem
The plummeting to earth, and then

And intercourse not well designed
For beings of a golden kind
Whose native green must arch above
The earth's obscene corrupting love

And still the ripe fruit and the branch
Observe the sky begin to blanch
Without a cry, without a prayer
With no betrayal of despair

Oh courage! Could you not as well
Select a second place to dwell
Not only in that golden tree
But in the frightened heart of me...





Nit of the Ignomy

BOSLEY CROWTHER in his July 1,1964 review refers to "...a thin mist of sweet gentility and oozing a sense of cultivation by virtue of the second-rate poetry the old man writes." in the "monotonous,all-talk, no-play film."

Touche.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #192 on: February 04, 2008, 03:14:28 PM »

Oh, ouch! Ouch!!!

Wicked, wicked bird!

Speaking of “wicked birds”—here’s a trivia question, my dears.

What’s the name of the charming old bag in The Ladykillers (1955)?

You know, the one with the parrot with such a wicked tongue?

Hint—Alec Guiness played the mastermind…
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yankguy
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« Reply #193 on: February 04, 2008, 03:31:42 PM »

That would be Mrs. Wilberforce (played by Katie Johnson).  Great, great movie, but strangely, I think, one of Ealing's weaker efforts.   
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Linger on, your pale blue eyes.............
madupont
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« Reply #194 on: February 04, 2008, 03:44:41 PM »

oilcanboyd3

I guess you are speaking of Nyack in regard to the boat. Nyack,New York is 20 minutes northwest of the George Washington Bridge, somewhat parallel to
Greenwich, or Stamford, Connecticut. I would bet harrie could better describe the locale known for its unsuburban atmosphere, more for the quaintness of Victorian period small town or just right for filming when you need a good location for a Cuckoo's Nest.
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