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Author Topic: Film Trivia  (Read 9625 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #195 on: February 04, 2008, 03:46:24 PM »

oilcanboyd3

I guess you are speaking of Nyack in regard to the boat. Nyack,New York is 20 minutes northwest of the George Washington Bridge, somewhat parallel to
Greenwich, or Stamford, Connecticut. I would bet harrie could better describe the locale known for its unsuburban atmosphere, more for the quaintness of Victorian period small town or just right for filming when you need a good location for a Cuckoo's Nest.

I've heard of Nyack, NY, but "OFOTCN" was shot in Oregon, and I'm pretty sure that was the setting of the story as well.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 03:48:50 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #196 on: February 04, 2008, 04:17:39 PM »

Make fun in your inappropriate malicious manner but there are some interesting things you probably don't know about the Characters in Tennessee Williams plays who are all inevitably outcasts.  For years, Thomas Lanier Williams, who was a sensible fellow made more sensitive by things that befell him, cloaked his dramatic characters when necessary to achieve success.  Thus the Reverend Shannon/Richard Burton's character  has less to do with-what-it-seems-to-do-with counter to Ava Gardner's type when cast as reprobate minister who is a ladies man.  In every play, they are just outcasts, pretty much equal to each other, as he felt that he was.  While in Tennessee years ago, I applied for a grant from his estate but was told that his sister being still alive at the time meant the estate was still going to her maintenance as she was hospitalized although not exactly like the inmates for the other film being discussed this afternoon,from Kesey.   Rose Williams had been Tom's only friend for many years from his childhood on and she is of course the girl in The Glass Menagerie who was a cripple.

In reality, Rose had been lobotomized and Tom lost her intellectual companionship. He spent time in New Orleans, where I did also but for far less time, as it happened coinciding in a period of time when Zachary Scott was there;but, he was close enough to where he had been born in Mississippi and you can tell that a number of his plays are set there with the exception of The Glass Menagerie(St.Louis,Missouri), and Streetcar,NOLA.   He became as alcoholic as implied in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and died because of it, then buried in St.Louis where my youngest sister lived during her marriage and raising her children.

In a sense he was on a similar wave-length to Truman Capote whose best friend was Harper Lee, although Tru developed a good handful of friendly sister substitutes until he blew them all off. Inevitable and probably because that was the company to which he had been accustommed while growing up and to express his ambivalence toward in some self-affirming way. With Tennessee, the remainder of the family turned out to be equivalently nuts as you can sense in the Amanda Wingfield character of his mother and his brother Dakin was absolutely looney tunes.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #197 on: February 04, 2008, 05:02:35 PM »



And now, trivia cognoscente—

The question you’ve all been waiting for…

Zachary Scott… in Mildred Pierce (1945)…

Who went down on nefarious handsome Zachary?

Joan Crawford?

Ann Blyth?

Eve Arden?

Jack Carson?

Maybe it was all 4 of them?

Surely somebody knows?



He spent time in New Orleans, where I did also but for far less time, as it happened coinciding in a period of time when Zachary Scott was there...


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madupont
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« Reply #198 on: February 04, 2008, 06:42:31 PM »

oilcanboyd3

I guess you are speaking of Nyack in regard to the boat. Nyack,New York is 20 minutes northwest of the George Washington Bridge, somewhat parallel to
Greenwich, or Stamford, Connecticut. I would bet harrie could better describe the locale known for its unsuburban atmosphere, more for the quaintness of Victorian period small town or just right for filming when you need a good location for a Cuckoo's Nest.

I've heard of Nyack, NY, but "OFOTCN" was shot in Oregon, and I'm pretty sure that was the setting of the story as well.


Nope, I'm just saying it sounds like a good name for a boat that you had thus far recalled as having a name that sounded like "Nack"; and that it is a town so close to NYC as to be suitable for East  Coast film makers and tv producers when they want that particular atmosphere.  Whomever did that Alec Baldwin film about "making a movie" found something of the kind for: State and Main; which is written as Vermont but used six different locations in Massachusetts.

Likewise,OFOTCN, shot in Depoe Bay,Oregon is based on Kesey's experiences working at a Menlo Park institution which is guess where? Well, not Nyack. Not even close. But I can understand where he got the idea of working where he did. Let's just say that someone who taught me a lot, taught himself Greek sufficient to translate the Greek classic poets while working in that kind of  hospital environment which gives that kind of quiet time at night while you are on duty in case of emergencies.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #199 on: February 05, 2008, 03:28:07 PM »

May I ask who has the floor?

I forgot what the last trivia question was for some reason...



Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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madupont
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« Reply #200 on: February 05, 2008, 03:34:26 PM »

I do. You took my turn; I'll take yours. 

In which film does this discussion take place?

Boris Podolsky: James! How's the rat business?
James Moreland: Well, actually it's mostly students I'm experimenting on now.
Kurt Godel: My God, the mazes must be enormous.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #201 on: February 05, 2008, 03:52:10 PM »

I do. You took my turn; I'll take yours. 

In which film does this discussion take place?

Boris Podolsky: James! How's the rat business?
James Moreland: Well, actually it's mostly students I'm experimenting on now.
Kurt Godel: My God, the mazes must be enormous.

That's an excellent "ratty" trivia question, my dear...

Simply a-maze-ing...


 Grin Grin Grin


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pugetopolis
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« Reply #202 on: February 05, 2008, 04:00:12 PM »

How about I. Q. (1994)?

Something so sadly lacking

... in this maudlin world today...

Ed Walters: Frank, this is Albert Einstein,
the smartest man in the world.

Frank: [greeting Einstein] How they hanging?

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« Reply #203 on: February 05, 2008, 04:20:57 PM »

Let's see now, oh yes...

In what movie did the Lady in the Radiator say:

"In Heaven, everything is fine.
In Heaven, everything is fine.
You've got your good things.
And I've got mine."


 Grin Grin Grin
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madupont
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« Reply #204 on: February 06, 2008, 02:14:07 AM »

I do. You took my turn; I'll take yours. 

In which film does this discussion take place?

Boris Podolsky: James! How's the rat business?
James Moreland: Well, actually it's mostly students I'm experimenting on now.
Kurt Godel: My God, the mazes must be enormous.

That's an excellent "ratty" trivia question, my dear...

Simply a-maze-ing...


 Grin Grin Grin





Amazing your amaneunsis got two out of three,"don't cha think?"(as you oft say). But, you could have least come up with Moreland on your own. 

I enjoyed the  Godel response because he was so  ingenuous.  "Albert Einstein and Gödel had a legendary friendship, shared in the walks they took together to and from the Institute for Advanced Study. The nature of their conversations was a mystery to the other Institute members. Economist Oskar Morgenstern recounts that toward the end of his life Einstein confided that his "own work no longer meant much, that he came to the Institute merely…to have the privilege of walking home with Gödel".

This is an old story  that shows up in The Packet from time to time. I had the pleasure of never solving what was posed  and, wondered did the IAS relocate at some point, because of the greater pleasure of visiting the Institute one February day of brilliant sunshine and freezing cold with the sunlight glinting off the ice?  I was there for a conference on copyright which was a trip with every kind of writer jotting pertinent notes. Because they were so intent, I could go off and contemplate the monastic life of this institution by quietly walking the halls of at least the public areas of the Institute for Advanced Study.

The purpose of the place was a tad bit larger than Yaddo for instance(which is there to remind you where Joyce Carol Oates came from before Princeton or maybe during and after?).  It functions for you where you hole up until you have completed whatever it is that you are after, meals show up to keep you alive, meals are served in the refectory when you are going in or going out, there are empty spaces in which to walk and contemplate, all in a very Georgian piece of architecture to remind you where you are.

I believe there was an earlier set up, following the war, where the G.I.s came back to school, and it looked exactly like places I've stayed at Universities before, a bit barracks (like that which could have upset a European ), however it was and is very American and to a European back then it was pretty much like a hostel. Is that what Morgenstern had in mind with the story of Einstein and Godel? I'd forgotten, who arrived first, and from such different atmospheres; would Einstein have said, come stay at my house?  The house is showing age.

At any rate, the movie was based on a premise without reality, more for the sake of Walter Matthau than Einstein, and I thought of it when Charles Durning was awarded (what was it? Oldest Living Actor? at the Screen Actors Guild Awards). He had the role of Louis Bamberger; why, I don't know. And I ran into him as himself, when he wasn't in character;meaning, I should probably have run into Matthau instead.

It occurs to me, we actually used to talk about these things, in what is now called Celebreality,before it was redefined for us; we would report "sightings" of the known and well-known.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #205 on: February 06, 2008, 03:09:30 AM »

Interesting. Thank you...

Yes, the forums redefine themselves...

Many forums like the Nabokov forum have gone through 3 or 4 reiterations...

The dialogic imagination seems to evolve tho...

Or at least morphs over time...

Nnyhav, whiskeypriest and you know...

And Teddy...



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« Reply #206 on: February 06, 2008, 12:32:46 PM »

What I want to know, Puget, is what WERE those squishy things the pancake-faced chanteuse kept stepping on?

(caution:  not a real trivia question....)

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #207 on: February 07, 2008, 11:48:48 PM »

What I want to know, Puget, is what WERE
those squishy things the pancake-faced
chanteuse kept stepping on?

Well, I asked my nephew who just
happens to live in Lynch’s guesthouse
what they were—but he didn’t know.
I asked this world-famous director friend
of mine who lives in Palm Springs—but
he didn’t know. I was even at a swanky
hoodoo-voodoo séance in the French
Quarter there in the Big Easy, my dear,
and we asked Madame Sosostein the
local claroozante to all the Louisiana
millionaires—but no luck. In fact, I
even forgot the name of the crummy
movie…So I’ll just turn the game back
over to you and what’s-her-name.…
Louella Parsons?   


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« Reply #208 on: February 08, 2008, 12:20:33 PM »

In what film does Jeremy Davies play the demented resident of a hotel in which one boarder thinks he's a fifth Beatle?  (question inspired by Davies' recent arrival on "Lost")

Bonus q. -- who plays the FBI agent and what does he share in common with actor Mitch Pileggi?

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madupont
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« Reply #209 on: February 08, 2008, 03:00:35 PM »

He plays Tom-Tom in The Million Dollar Hotel, and Mel Gibson does that unusual role. Isn't PSH also in this film?  I really like this film and think that is because I saw it at the right time to understand it as what is happening out there "economically"/"socially".   I just didn't agree with sleeze as the answer to the problem of the sell-fulfilling prophecy.

PS. Not PSH but Tim Roth?
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