Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Arts and Exhibitions  (Read 2255 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2007, 12:59:29 PM »

Did anyone see the PBS on David, in the Power of Art Series?   David happened to be the first thing that I posted in here(because somebody had brought it up, in reference to the Sopranos, as the inspiration for one of their later dvd covers; and I was dumb-founded by the awkwardness of the paint texture or rather the sloppiness, although the classic Roman forms were there which was what the Academy was all about for French painters.  This just wasn't the David that I knew.

Simon Schama doesn't like him much, for the qualities that I admire in David; and makes some slur to end the show, which was on:The Death of Marat, about "continuing to paint-on perfecting the high gloss." It is exactly the high-gloss that I admire; and rather think that David should be admired for mastering the technique which became important to European art for at least most of the next century. Schama doesn't "note" the modeling of the figure underneath the high-gloss,which has everything to do with how light is conveyed and placed with precision which indicates there is more than the trompe l'oeil of the wood grain on the bottom of the box that Marat uses for a desk  while soaking in his bath. But Schama equates the high-gloss with David's having been the painter of the Revolution and begins to  extrapolate on the political correctness of the art rather than the art.

It is safe to say that when "Simon says" or Schama goes on television in this day and age that he not advocate: Terror. But instead uses every example he can think of to politically condemn the French Revolution that David so masterfully records. I dare say, that for those who did not read French, or follow up by investigating what Thomas Carlyle thought, it was David's paintings that showed them what the Revolution had been.

But, Schama has the last word because of his huge, foot-noted compendium, Citizens, A Chronicle of the French Revolution; then ,reveals by his analysis in this--Death of Marat--something which was not as apparent in his glorious review of Amsterdam and the sex life of Rembrandt,  that he values political correctness over technique,craft, skill. His criteria in art is political, that it lies, in other words it is propaganda.

One, particularly got that feeling when he resents that David, sitting in the Bastille, painted his self-portrait, as a memoriam and a celebration to be remembered by, representing himself as a young man in the glory of romantic youth. Luckily, the painter David was rescued by a patron and, following the Empire, when exiled, upon the return of Royalty to privilege and power, "kept on perfecting that high-gloss", for the Royalists would not allow his widow to bring his body back from Brussels for burial in France, a favor not allowed supporters of Revolution who advocated the death of Monarchy. (I have not investigated to find out whether he ever did arrive at Pere Lachaise.)

But for the answer to the mysteries of why a tv lecturer as an expert on art rather than an historian carps on as the crotchety little person we see today, one has only to look at the book jacket of, Citizens, and compare the photograph of what he once was to the image on the screen.
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madupont
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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2007, 01:05:49 PM »

Correction.  It was Delacroix that I first mentioned because he wasn't enough like David!
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madupont
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« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2007, 12:16:15 AM »


Art
After 50 Years, the Barnes Way, Still
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/22/arts/design/22kenn.html?_r=1&ref=arts&oref=slogin
« Last Edit: July 22, 2007, 12:21:35 AM by madupont » Logged
learn.
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« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2007, 10:45:37 AM »




Any fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius-and a lot of courage-to move in the opposite direction. - Albert Einstein
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Haiku

Children are sponges.
Others actions are absorbed.
Is the water clean?
incadove0
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« Reply #19 on: August 06, 2007, 08:16:35 PM »

The Hidden Half: A Photo Essay on Women in Afghanistan

Photo Essay by Lana Šlezi?

http://www.motherjones.com/photo/2007/07/hidden_half.html
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How many seas must the white dove sail before she sleeps in the sand?
incadove0
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« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2007, 03:15:47 PM »

Remembering Nagasaki

http://exploritorium.com/nagasaki/index.html
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How many seas must the white dove sail before she sleeps in the sand?
nytempsperdu
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« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2007, 11:30:17 PM »

For less traditional Japanese art, there's this exhibit that lets one trace the manga phenom back, from Tezuka back to Yoshitoshi (elsewhere in the museum back to Hiroshige & Hokusai & before)

http://www.asianart.org/

The Tezuka exhibit had a manga blast day with exhibits, printmaking, huge sheets for drawing your own characters, caricaturists that would draw one as a manga character, and quite a few participants in costume (something called cosplay -- for costume play, perhaps similar to what my older daughter enjoyed during the days of midnight showings of Rocky Horror Picture Show at Don Pancho's Art Theater in ABQ NM).  Younger daughter took second prize in her Pokky (Japanese snack--shortbread sticks with various flavored coatings) box costume from last Hallowe'en. 

Tezuka's early work surprised me in the way it reflected WWII era issues, including post-Hiroshima ones, and I was also surprised at the wide range of subject matter and the level of artistry in what were, basically, newspaper cartoons and later animated tv shows. 

The day at the museum was a revelation of a whole part of my kid's culture and mindset of which I had but an inkling (and through which she was kind and patient enough to guide me--when she wasn't with her fellow cosplayer friend participating in rituals I still know not of).         
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madupont
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« Reply #22 on: August 11, 2007, 04:30:10 PM »

nytempsperdu,re:#22

The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

Yoshitoshi's Strange Tales:
Woodblock Prints from Edo to Meiji
Through September 2 

This is the period that has always fascinated me, as you can see by the illustration, with the extreme length of hair tied very low so that it moves together if at all -- and the short wide eyebrows painted green, and the smaller flower-bud mouth obviously painted to be small.  Of course, when I was there (in S.F., there were no Japanese there at the time what so ever. They gradually came back from relocation. The women in my sister-in-law's family all succumbed to cancer save one sister surviving and my sister-in-law presently receiving radiation therapy. Personally, I think it had something to do with the shock of being transported to detention centers where they lived under surprisingly primitive conditions compared to the homes that they had in S.F.).
 
A bit to the south by all means, on my side of the family, my great niece's husband does anime for one of the studios in L.A. but I forget which and he isn't even Japanese but Roumanian and they met at Berkeley. I look forward to getting to know them better(as adults) when I relocate(very slowly).   

Who mentioned Albuquerque? You or lhoffman?  The great-niece's mother, my sister, thinks she might relocate there because it is arty enough to suit; and occasionally drags her two daughters off to play in small desert locales around there during school breaks for the younger one at Brown.
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sumen
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« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2007, 05:13:29 PM »


Thanks for the reminder. i remember the day. Also a few days later when the war ended. Mixed feelings. Hopefully never again. Susan.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2007, 06:20:02 PM »

Many thanks for clock link, lhoffman, I didn't know about it, will show it to kid, too.

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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2007, 04:12:01 PM »

Quote
even without a face, Kulhanek manages to convey a sense of total dejection and abandonment.

Indeed, and maybe especially without a face.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2007, 05:06:34 PM »

(BTW back: I'm overcoming my usual OCD tendencies this time around and skipping some of the speeches, resolutions, etc.  Now that I'm no longer familiar with the various factions (or feel obliged to be), I am enjoying just riding the revolutionary wave, and Reed's evocative language can make a reader see a character or feel a moment in quite a short sentence or two.  It did strike me how very many newspapers were put out as so many groups vied for power--almost like having lots of websites available but having trouble knowing which are trustworthy, perhaps?)

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madupont
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« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2007, 09:56:07 AM »

http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/m3/Ray-Caesar/p116/The-Power-And-The-Glory/product_info.html

Enlargement:
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=116&image=0

Incognito
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=94&image=0

Queen of Flies
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=110&image=0

Monday's Child
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=101&image=0

Foreign Tongue
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=88&image=0

Prelude
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=106&image=0

Castor
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=82&image=0

Pollax
http://www.richardgoodallgallery.com/contemporaryart/popup_image.php?pID=105&image=0
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madupont
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« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2007, 02:07:13 PM »

"Last night in New York. After a beautiful day, sunny and bright, an unseasonably warm (but who’s complaining?) evening. I started out at the 67th Street Armory on Park Avenue where they were holding the Opening night Preview Party of the International Art + Design Fair 2007 to benefit The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design and Culture.

We’ve covered so many of these fairs over the years that it amazes me that each remains new and fresh.  We arrived shortly after 6 when guests were just about to arrive so the aisles were fairly empty and ideal for looking. This Art + Design Fair is full of beautiful things – furniture, paintings,  rugs and tapestries, silvers and bronzes, metal work, crystal and glassware. Art Deco, Art Nouveau.

We were there to observe and to photograph but I kept thinking how nice it would be to return on Saturday or Sunday or Monday just for a leisurely look at the beauty man can create. At the Jason Jacques booth which features Art Nouveau and Japonist Ceramic Masterworks, we were admiring an Art Nouveau fireplace made by Hector Guimard.

I asked Mr. Jacques about Art Nouveau and the artist. It was in vogue for about five, maybe ten years, in the late 1890s through 1905. Guimard is the man who did the metal work décor for the Metro in Paris. Jacques pointed out that  Guimard continued to create beautiful pieces up until 1935 athough they were no longer selling. They’re selling now, however, eight decades after his passing, and for prices he couldn’t have dreamed of. Beautiful.

The fair is open through next Wednesday, October 10."  DPC at NYSD
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madupont
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« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2007, 11:27:07 PM »

"I left the Armory and went over to Sotheby’s where they were holding a kick-off party for potential committee members for a Spring 2008 luncheon that will benefit NOFA-NY (Northeast Organic Farming Association), a not-for-profit advocacy and education organization of farmers, gardeners and consumers. 

NOFA is the oldest and largest organization in the state of New York devoted to organic farming, gardening and the connection between farmers and consumers,  encouraging locallyandregionally grownfoods. 

I emphasized the latter because although “organic” has become a hip buzzword in our culture, it is also overused to the point of exaggeration and outright falsehood, and we’ve come to take it for granted. The NOFA mission, however, is about creating a sustainable and affordable regional food system that is truly organic. They are committed to bringing information on food choices to the general public to ensure a healthy (and reliable)  future for all of us. Hip, sleek and cool may define a lot of the contemporary interest in organic and regionally grown foods but the future has something else in store for us: dire necessity. Hard for a lot of us to believe in the age of aeronautics and rocket science. But believe it because it’s nigh unto upon us. "  Columbia NYSD
 
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