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Author Topic: Popular Music  (Read 14154 times)
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cincy--man
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« Reply #255 on: June 20, 2007, 10:56:45 AM »

On the ever-popular topic of “early” music, the type that lulu and I usually discuss is more in the renaissance-medieval time frame. If you are interested in more detail, check out my amazon list on this topic:
http://www.amazon.com/Sampling-my-favorite-medieval-music/lm/L0CGE530I3LY/ref=cm_lm_byauthor_title_full/102-1836052-2131349
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madupont
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« Reply #256 on: June 20, 2007, 08:42:23 PM »

Thanks!   This stuff always makes me want to dance.   That is, I used to but I'm not up to it anymore. This goes back to Louis Horst who introduced Pre-classic dance forms. 

Since the subject came up, I'd begun to wonder how I became interested; and after listening to the opener on your list, I think it goes right back to Laurence Olivier's: Richard, the IIIrd., where he puts the fix on Lady Anne/Claire Bloom, over her dead husband.

Here's another example of what film has done with this music --

16th.century  Retour de Martin Guerre  Carriere,director;
but I extend my interest as far as:
Sainte Colombe,  17th. century, Tous les matins du monde   Corneau,dir.

Merci
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cincy--man
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« Reply #257 on: June 21, 2007, 10:40:55 AM »

np--John Renbourn (Ship of Fools): I LIVE NOT WHERE I LOVE.

I am also in a celebratory mood since I received word that the next grandchild will be a girl!! Will celebrate with very upbeat dance like celtic music!
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cincy--man
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« Reply #258 on: June 21, 2007, 12:25:42 PM »

Madupont:
 
TY for checking out the list. It is great too see you are also in tune with the spirit of the music. So many think that this is nothing more then “contemplative” (or dreary?) chant-like songs. It is more often a mix of spirited, energetic and dance like music and ballads that are evocative in their tuneful simplicity.
 
The first item is La Roque ‘n’ Roll,  one of the many Baltimore Consort releases which is indeed very dance-like and energetic in many parts. I put it no. 1 on my list because I think it is one of the best ways for someone not familiar with this genre to listen to and enjoy it.

But it also contains one of the most engaging  melodies ever written, Un jeune fillette. The same song that was one of the musical gems in the ST to the film,”Tous les Matins du Monde”. The stark and unpretentious simplicity of the song contributes greatly to its deep appeal, IMHO.

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madupont
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« Reply #259 on: June 21, 2007, 01:01:14 PM »

I think that people misunderstand that culturally these were danced; rather than the notion of the ballade Provencal of some wandering Huguenots in the time of Catherine de Medici.   In my household, overhearing the sample, someone said,"madrigal". I said, No.  (not the same thing, related perhaps but one is not the other). In Spain, dancing of these pre-classic dance-forms was done in the Roman Catholic Church as part of liturgical services.

If I find something on Horst's work, will post.

Meanwhile in explanation of above paragraph, hope you have had a chance to see, Queen Margot (1994) by Patrice Chereau
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cincy--man
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« Reply #260 on: June 21, 2007, 02:14:54 PM »

I've not seen that movie. Should I put it on the netflix list?

Of course the topic of "early" music and dance brings to mind the Playford tunes and English Country Dancing. Have you explored that?
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madupont
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« Reply #261 on: June 21, 2007, 03:16:31 PM »

I've not seen that movie. Should I put it on the netflix list?

Of course the topic of "early" music and dance brings to mind the Playford tunes and English Country Dancing. Have you explored that?

It is perhaps the best film in regard to the period of the Huguenot split, and the Dutch backing to go to war, following the St. Bartholmew's Day Massacre initiated by Queen Catharine who being a Medici manages to poison her own son heir to the throne.  It's a great insight into the reality of these people as people; having most of our bad habits and oft tempted.


re: English Country Dancing, for awhile I was strongly tempted myself -- there are regular weekly sessions of Scots Country dancing in Mercer county, New Jersey which was settled by the Scots in the 17th.century round and "aboot" Princeton. The settlement crosses into Pennsylvania, as this was once actually part of Penns Woods, so they hold the Scots games and gathering of the clans over there on that side of the Delaware River.  Every now and then the Black Watch Pipers drop by at the park on the Pennsylvania side of Washington's Landing.  On that drone...

I once had an odd occurrence when living at Hopewell, when I could plainly hear a piper playing but could not figure where they were, the sound seemed to come from behind the house and uphill to what I called, "the moor" as it was a flat level place at the very top of the rise where farmers still planted, and wild turkeys roamed, in the method of early English farmers in that area who used what is called a wagon-wheel format with a village square in the center of the wheel and then pie-shaped partitions with their homes on the square usually in a valley while their land rose behind the houses. It is difficult to cultivate in this way unless terraces are made. I was living in the old offices of the town's newspaper up on the third floor under the trees as if in a tree house but, from these windows, I could see across to High Fields which Charles Lindbergh had built, turning a piece of previously terraced land into an air-strip.

After looking everywhere for that apparently marching bagpiper, by following the sound, I went back around to my front windows -- and there she was! Down in the village square  where I soon found out that she had parked her car in order to find a place to practice because she had been counting off directional steps as she marched and turned, marched and turned. She figured a public place was the best bet, compared to a,ah,"public place" but soon encountered a bold move by my next door neighbour, a Conservative  Jewish rabbi which means that she could also be defined as a lady rabbi.  Apparently, she had "had it", and didn't exactly slam her front door but looked for the traffic, crossed the street to accost the bag-piper. No violence, nothing like that,but the piper smartly let the air out of the bag, detached the pipes, and packed them all into the trunk of her car and off she went never to be heard from again. Unfortunately. It was one of those things that we could have used every so often to break up the monotony of country life, which is I'm sure why country-dancing was adopted in those parts.

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lulu
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« Reply #262 on: June 21, 2007, 03:27:23 PM »

Queen Margot is a wonderful movie with the excellent Isabel Adjani and the always wonderful Daniel Auteiul.  The book by Alexandres Dumas is definitely worth reading.  funny, I don't recall the music. 

However, there is an opera about the massacre of the Hugenots: Les Huguenots (or Gli Ugonotti in Italian).  It's a wonderful work; can't vouch for accuracy since historical operas are no closer to the truth than Hollywood's version of history.

I love the music in Anne of the Thousand Days. 
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cincy--man
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« Reply #263 on: June 21, 2007, 03:55:44 PM »

madupont--I have never tried Scottish dancing but know enough to appreciate that it is very different than English Country, which is more slow and elegant and can be very challenging in terms of the intricacy of the patterns for the movments of dancers in a group.

"Conservative  Jewish rabbi "-- if you find a non-Jewish rabbi please introduce me to him or her!! Just teasing a bit.

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madupont
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« Reply #264 on: June 21, 2007, 04:40:12 PM »

Well, you see  how it is, things always become more convoluted if you are trying not to say, "Conservative lady rabbi", because it sounds merely Republican or something. At least, in that neighbourhood.

"English Country, which is more slow and elegant and can be very challenging in terms of the intricacy of the patterns for the movements of dancers in a group."   Slow and elegant, I will agree -- in terms of the music and the choreography itself, I can't identify the example that I wish to give here, because I think it may be the Helen Mirren version of Elizabeth I, the Queen, rather than Blanchett, and I recall being quite impressed with the dance sequences. It was also an intricate pattern for the group but whether it was a little extra something that she put into the acting on those lifts, slow and elegant was anything but staid.  Of course, I could be entirely wrong about the identity of the film? It could have been something made by the BBC for PBS about another facet ot Tudor history? It had a particularly obnoxioux young actor, rather a Ben Affeck on a bad day who had poisoned his wife bit by bit so that he could marry Elizabeth and thus become "King", so that she had to have him beheaded anyway for the presumption alone of seducing her out of her authority.

In fact, this may be one of the plots to which Lulu referred, as some of her preferred reading in English history.


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cincy--man
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« Reply #265 on: June 21, 2007, 04:51:26 PM »

English Country Dance and Contra Dance are supposed to be flirtatious in spirit...lots of eye contact and smiles. English Country has been in a lot of films, esp. those based on Jane Austin novels. Not sure if contra dance has been.
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madupont
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« Reply #266 on: June 21, 2007, 05:08:06 PM »

Lulu, have to warn you, I recently went to see Daniel Auteuil in, The Valet, because the reviews had made it sound like a mystery. False advertisements, it is a very bad comedy.  It has some good funny moments but it begins to run out of steam as the producers misuse both Auteuil and Kristin Scott Thomas in what used to be called "a French Bedroom Farce", so that these guys making the film could introduce a new talent. A taller, smarter version of what Bardo had been but with well-developed thighs.  Producers do this now and then, show-case "talent" so they can raise money to keep giving her movies to make her a star. I recognized that I had seen  a remarkable shot of her, probably in the nytimes.com  that had made my jaw drop, when I saw that shot again in sequence in the midst of the film.  Poor Auteuil, they are doing to him what was done to Giancarlo Giannini(the great star of Lina Wertmuller's films).

Your post reminded me that there is a book that was done about Queen Margot's neighbourhood that I'd been meaning to read and must look up in hopes that I can still find it.

My favourite actor in Queen Margot is Jean-Hugues Anglade as Louis. Vincent Perez is maybe a third.
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madupont
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« Reply #267 on: June 21, 2007, 07:27:46 PM »

Correction:

I was wrong about, "LOUIS" !
Charles IX (Jean-Hugues Anglade), the King of France,

"Mr. Chereau, a noted director of theater and opera,..."

Music:

"...the very young Margot, a raven-haired vision described by Dumas as a French national treasure. She preens with all due magnificence, even when, during one of the film's most deliciously ludicrous moments, she roams the streets of Paris wearing a ball gown and a tiny eye mask, trying to pass incognito while searching for a lover. The man she finds, the Comte Joseph-Hyacinthe Boniface de Lerac de la Mole (Vincent Perez), is presented as so noble a figure that  'religious music sanctifies each Margot-La Mole love scene'. "

music by Goran Bregovic;  " rock star hairdos (the sons of Catherine de Medicis could pass for an aging heavy-metal band)"... "the happy family portrait is compounded by strong hints of incest, which also envelop Margot. One of the film's typically impassioned exchanges finds Margot very nearly being raped by her brothers." ...  "In this overheated atmosphere, the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, involving the slaughter of thousands of Protestants by Catherine's minions, is actually one of the calmer episodes depicted on screen."

"  Be grateful there won't be a quiz when the film is over. "

I could not transfer the picture of the real star of--The Valet,  but here she is:
  http://movies2.nytimes.com/2007/04/20/movies/20vale.html
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bosox18d
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« Reply #268 on: June 22, 2007, 03:16:53 AM »

I just listened to the samples for the new Bryan Ferry album of Dylan covers and while I have read some great reviews and love Ferry I just don't get the album.None of the samples really did much for me except for"Knocking on Heaven's Door" which is really good.
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bosox18d
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« Reply #269 on: June 22, 2007, 03:19:00 AM »

Mind you maybe I'm spoiled cause of Ferry's earlier covers of Neil Young's"Like A Hurricane" and Lennon's"Jealous Guy" which were both covered so well.
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"If it keeps going like this,the Zamboni driver is going to be the first star"
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