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Author Topic: Classical Music  (Read 3076 times)
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lulu
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« Reply #30 on: August 02, 2007, 01:25:31 PM »

Was listening to Dvorak this morning.  I don't think I have heard anything of his that I didn't like.  And I certainly love Rusalka, his opera, which I haven't played since I bought it.

A friend just sent me several cds which are waiting to be played along with my other new cds.

I just received (from netflix: my are they ever fast) Bergman's Magic Flute which I haven't seen since it was first released and was not a big opera fan.  However, I've become one since and just saw Julie Taymor's amazing production at the Met.  Also in my order is a tape of Monteverdi's Orfeo.

So, some interesting viewing this weekend (and listening, as well).
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cincy--man
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« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2007, 03:17:19 PM »

Dvorak is a good example of a composer who reached his apogee in his chamber music. The Dumky Trio is simply sublime. Not to mention the piano quintet.
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madupont
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« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2007, 04:40:05 PM »

karlhenning:

Dvo?ák . . . .

"And phases of  . . . Rakhmaninov, without the k/ how about c ? . . .  . . . Beethoven . . . . . . Brahms . . . Schumann . . . Schoenberg . . . Copland . . . . . . . . . Debussy . . . Ravel . . . . . . "  Add playing Schubert, Haydn, and much Chopin.

I enjoyed playing all of them with the exception of Copeland and Schoenberg whom I listened to as with Mahler. I preferred the minor keys of Rachmaninoff,Dvorak,Prokofiev,Mussorgsky but what do I know(?) as I also became a Bach virtuoso before I was out of high-school but I had a good example in my neighborhood during my grade-school days, when he was in high-school, name of Raskin. Can no longer remember his first name(Marcus?) but he went on to the Washington,D.C. group for Democratic Studies.

Five to eight more years later and I was more impressed with Prokofiev scores for Eisenstein.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2007, 05:23:56 PM »

Here's my observation on high school virtuosi....on Bach or anyone....sure you can play the notes, but is it music?  Most talented high school pianists are disheartened to learn upon entering conservatory that those pieces they thought they had attained virtuosity on in HS will need to be relearned.  Walk past the practice rooms....EVERYBODY is doing some Beethoven Sonata.  True virtuousity is only attained through a combination of study, practice, performance and life.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2007, 05:27:44 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2007, 05:56:55 PM »

I didn't study music in high-school. That would have been foolish. I began playing before age five.  I don't think that really is so odd, considering.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2007, 06:14:57 PM »

I don't quite understand your point about the foolishness of studying music in High School.

The early playing is probably true of most students in conservatory.  True virtuosity is not possible without true understanding....and High Schoolers tend to not have the capacity to understand Bach.   It is interesting to follow the improvement of High School "virtuosi" as they progress through their studies.  It is amazing to note how much more virtuoustic they become as they gain an understanding of music history, music theory, composition  (maybe a bit of mathematics...sadly neglected by most musicians) which is why all but a very few students in conservatory study all these things (except for the math).
« Last Edit: August 02, 2007, 06:16:46 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2007, 07:11:34 PM »

I didn't study in a conservatory. But the restrictions of the convent made it difficult to continue piano very much at all, although my mother did not seem to appreciate that factor. I always had  a private teacher from the point that it was understood what I was playing.  My husband did study in the conservatory which was located close to where I lived (before I went to New York) in the old Pillsbury Manor which was owned by Pete Chalifont, Louis Armstrong's manager at one point, so most of his tenents were either artists or white jazz musicians like himself.
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cincy--man
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« Reply #37 on: August 03, 2007, 10:04:07 AM »

Marcus Raskin, along with Bernard Fall, was the co-editor of the Viet Nam reader...an amazing book for its time.
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karlhenning
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« Reply #38 on: August 06, 2007, 09:40:09 AM »

Was listening to Dvorak this morning.  I don't think I have heard anything of his that I didn't like.

Well, and our neighbor here reminds me that I need to investigate the Piano Quintet!

Cheers,
~Karl
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madupont
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« Reply #39 on: August 06, 2007, 11:15:50 AM »

Marcus Raskin, along with Bernard Fall, was the co-editor of the Viet Nam reader...an amazing book for its time.


That's him! Thanks to you, cincy--man, I've relocated the guy that I used to walk to school with every day when I was in grade school and he was in high school.  On my route, you could hear him practicing piano before he left for school for the day, he must have had the piano positioned with a window view by which he could see or he had it clocked when I would pass the house for school, he would burst out the door, down the short drive to the sidewalk, with very long legs, as he was quite a tall man to a kid my age at the time although we were in actuality not altogether that many years apart in age.

He knew that I played the piano because he quizzed me thoroughly in comparing "notes". It didn't take long to check the list of his publications,etc. As I immediately found one with Gore Vidal writing the preface! Following down the resume, last but not least the remark that he was an outstanding pianist.
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cincy--man
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« Reply #40 on: August 07, 2007, 10:44:36 AM »

madu--cant get childhood experiences like that living in Cincy...thanks for the sharing.

Listened to a disc that I wasn't sure I would like but did very much. Philip Glass, the Concerto Project Val. II. Contains After Lewis and Clark and Conceto for Harpsichord and Orchestra.

NP -- Buxtehude--Membra Jesu Nostri by The Netherlands Bach Society. Gorgeous music well performed.
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karlhenning
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« Reply #41 on: August 13, 2007, 09:40:36 AM »

(Man, this Elliott Carter quartet has a cadenza for everybody! -- except the second violin.

What's up widdat?)  Cool
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lulu
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« Reply #42 on: August 14, 2007, 08:50:25 PM »

Howdee, Karl.

I was listening to Saint Saens tonight.  No matter what is playing by him, I love it.  I'm developing a love affair with this composer.
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karlhenning
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« Reply #43 on: August 16, 2007, 08:45:16 AM »

That's beautiful, Sheila! :-)
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cincy--man
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« Reply #44 on: August 16, 2007, 11:11:12 AM »

Here is something to chew on. How do we look at the morality of acts of musical piracy or borrowing when a composer such as Handel used themes created by other composers? He is famously reputed to have said that he didn't steal it, but rescued it. On one hand it seems dishonest, but is there a greater good served in the sense that but for his acts, some worthy themes would have been lost forever. But with his acts later generations can hear and enjoy them. Do we view his acts solely from the perspective of when they were perpetrated, or also from our current perspective of posterity?
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