Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 23, 2018, 04:58:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]
  Print  
Author Topic: Classical Music  (Read 1639 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #60 on: November 28, 2007, 09:29:51 AM »

madu--very nice indeed. I am  a huge fan of very early music...i.e. renaissance and medieval. Check out my amazon.com list re the same: 

http://www.amazon.com/Sampling-my-favorite-medieval-music/lm/L0CGE530I3LY/ref=cm_lm_byauthor_title_full
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #61 on: November 28, 2007, 02:27:07 PM »

Thank you,   I like it better than anything.  I think that really hit me when
Jean-Claude Carrière was writing a film concept's "screen play" and consulted with Natalie Zemon Davis of the Romance Languages and French History dept. at Princeton to authenticate "background" and "production values" for Daniel Vigne's, The Return of Martin Guerre.

Although Michel Portal is credited with the music on this film (not to be confused with Sommersby) and has a long career, when I found out that Carriere is from Languedoc, I went "ahah!" that explains this music. I immediately became interested in what is called "Ancient music"( sort of a St. Martin in the Fields speciality)or, in the case of France,even "Early
Modern".

While I certainly had a long time exposure to Gregorian Chant, why I mention the Languedoc connection is that this entire southern region of
France, with it's shift into a different language pronunciation and derivations from other scources,despite the Roman conquest was also later invaded by waves of Berbers from North Africa, and other Muslim centers; and, it show in the music. Or rather, it can be heard, as a strong influence.

By the way, an interesting thing in the study of Linguistics, if you look at the word changes as they occur for even just one word, perhaps moving from East to West, you can parallel the border shift, of the musical change in emphasis, in a gradual flow. When I discovered this at about age 14,in high school, sometimes playing "hooky" when I missed the bus which sped past me (who was following the schedule while the driver was making time), I'd opt for staying on the next bus that came along rather than being tardy and having to serve detention after school.

I'd head right for the music stores, where in those days you  had wonderful spacious closed booths like small rooms of lovely wood topped with glass, where you could listen to records you might buy, and had plenty of room to do a little choreography while you were at it.

Then on to the Main Library to study; what I wanted to study. They caught up with me soon enough (which is why I got at least three months for more Liturgical music, aka Gregorian chant, and a side course in "voice" from Sister Gilbert,whom you might call," a defrocked Opera singer", extremely bitter, who lectured me while teaching me French Art Song).

Logged
lulu
Full Member
***
Posts: 169


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #62 on: November 29, 2007, 09:35:28 AM »

Holy cow!  Early music discussion?

Jacobs and I love the stuff.  Some of my stuff (thanks to Jacobs) includes La Nef, Boston Camerata, Ensemble Unicorn; music of Hildegarde Bingen.  I also have a cd of chants which I bought at the Met Museum in connection with their Byzantium exhibit.  I'm always anxious to hear more and learn more.
Logged
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #63 on: November 29, 2007, 12:04:28 PM »

My sort of early music is nothing at all like Gregorian Chant. I find that music to be incredibly boring and jejune.
Logged
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #64 on: December 17, 2007, 02:21:19 PM »

Interesting article in sunday times about Schwartz and the turmoil at the Seattle S. O. Anyone else read it?
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #65 on: December 31, 2007, 01:05:26 AM »

Happy New Year, cincy-man (and, ne'r auld acquaintance be forgot for auld lang syne!).
Logged
mlewis78
Newbie
*
Posts: 10


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #66 on: December 31, 2007, 04:27:25 AM »

Cincy-man, I just started looking at the list you posted a link to on 11/28/07.  I have one of the Baltimore Consort's recordings -- Bright Star Day -- nice for the holiday season.

I have a pretty good collection of Hesperion XXI and other groups that Jordi Savall leads.  Rolf Lislevand is also very good.  I just now purchased and am listening to "Ostinato" (Hesperion XXI - Jordi Savall) in mp3 format from Amazon. 

Marti
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #67 on: December 31, 2007, 09:36:36 AM »

mlewis78

Are you the same Marti from New Jersey who posted at the nytimes.com History forum? or, am I having a Monday morning coincidence?
Logged
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #68 on: December 31, 2007, 02:27:15 PM »

madu...and a great new year to you!! Another one of sharing the most sublime of human creations...music. One of the few that are not fixed in time and open to new understanding, new interpretation, and new presentation.

Perhaps that is one reason that I am  so enamored of early music...it is grounded in the long distant past but so open to new ways or interpretation and presentation that bring fully to the fore the creative talents of our most contemporary interpreters.

mlewis--great groups indeed. So much more to explore!!

Logged
mlewis78
Newbie
*
Posts: 10


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #69 on: January 02, 2008, 04:25:43 AM »

Madupont wrote:
mlewis78
Are you the same Marti from New Jersey who posted at the nytimes.com History forum? or, am I having a Monday morning coincidence?


Hi Maddy,
Yes, I'm that person.  I haven't been in Escape forms as often, but I posted before the Henry Adams discussion that I was going to read it and then I got caught up with 3 other books and have yet to read beyond p. 60 in Adams.  I'm in NYC about all of my adult life, but I'm from Long Branch, NJ.  In the NY Times now-dead forums, I was Marti443.

Back to early music: 

Has anyone here listened to a relatively new British choral group of 12, Stile Antico?  I'm nuts about their CD "Music for Compline."  I don't know if I would have heard of this if it were not for Archive.com's writing about it on their website and including it in their top 25 of 2007 recordings.

Happy New Year, everyone.

Marti
Logged
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #70 on: January 07, 2008, 05:44:45 PM »

all choral? no instruments?
Logged
mlewis78
Newbie
*
Posts: 10


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2008, 11:23:32 PM »

Cincy,

Yes "Music for Compline" is all choral, which I am not usually a big fan of (I'm a flutist), but during the Christmas season I became very taken with this recording as well as Chanticleer's of Palestrina's Missa pro defunctis (Requiem) and motets. 

I think that my interest in it grew out of my rediscovery of renaissance bands playing seasonal music and the great recording from the 1960's of the Antiphonal Music of Gabrieli (Philadelphia Brass with Chicago, Cleveland and Boston Brass ensembles).

I've been listening a lot the past two weeks Jordi Savall Hesperion XXI recordings.  I found some YouTube videos, including one of a trio with 3 Savalls -- Jordi, Arianna and her brother -- you know it's possible that someone posted the link on this forum.  I'm not very diligent about checking back before posting.

Marti
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2008, 11:38:53 PM »

Sshh...Marti, if nobody's listening, big secret, I used to sing Compline, and we would learn the next day's(instead of doing our study-hall) because it is the liturgy sung for each days order of Hours, somewhat like the Book of Hours is an illustrated example, and changing throughout the year, back when I was in convent school.

Of course, we did Requiem masses ever since childhood and throughout the year but particularly so in November as a penitential time of year before Advent prepares for Christmas.
Logged
cincy--man
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #73 on: January 10, 2008, 03:25:17 PM »

Marti..what you are describing, e.g. Palestrina,  sounds a bit restrained for my tastes. What I like most is a more energetic song such as Dead Can Dance doing an Italian saltarello:  http://youtube.com/watch?v=K3jr2aezZ00  (the figure skating video you can take or leave). This is a slightly "raved up version perhaps, but you find the same spirit in a good original group interpretation.
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2015


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #74 on: May 16, 2008, 06:27:47 PM »

http://video.yahoo.com/watch/2627975/7719382

Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!