Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
July 17, 2018, 09:14:29 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7
  Print  
Author Topic: Jazz  (Read 2791 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2007, 04:24:25 AM »

Real treat next month in Vilnius, the Leaders,

http://www.vilniuscityjazz.lt/?pid=the-leaders

along with Joe McPhee.
Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #46 on: October 28, 2007, 04:28:51 AM »

Lee Morgan was 33 when he got shot to death in between sets at Slug's by Helen Moore, apparently over another woman, according to Billy Hart,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Morgan

Morgan is probably best remembered for Sidewinder, a great album, not to mention a frequently overdubbed track by Hip Hop singers.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2007, 06:41:20 AM by Dzimas » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #47 on: October 29, 2007, 08:09:46 AM »

Dzimas, this was very hard to take, reading the account and listening to the tape. Lee was all of twenty years old when I last saw him in Chicago,summer of 1959. He was there with Hank Mobley, who was also on the way out and died at home with his parents in Philadelphia. I keep recalling what Art Blakey said one winter night on the way uptown to Smalls in a tax-cab, when he noticed some kid on the street walking diagonally in front of us,  "...my people. They have a real death urge."

The details accounted, took me right back, unsurprised that this scene never changed. Yes, everyone of those clubs were little bitty places, holes in the wall but famous, as Max Gorden's wife says about the Vanguard(I never had an office, just a desk in the kitchen [where the musicians sat around between sets...]. I don't think that I ever walked into a backroom in my life; one just knew not to.  These were places where you couldn't even turn around in the bathroom or just barely. The only time,you saw a larger club was with the formation of a larger group to play it, when Birdland still existed; or, maybe out on the road, someone sat in and these new combinations happened. I think, I did know everyone of those musicians, with the exception of some of the younger guys who had come up by the time of that shooting; and, whomever said it,that scene is classic,never changes, it's haunting, and you really can't believe it happens in every detail like something handed down from the past, as if it didn't matter where you came from and you might as well never had to leave because it caught up with you anyway.

At first reading and listening to the account, I couldn't imagine the person being described could have been Lee who was always neat as a pin, never laid back but showing up righteous copping an attitude like,"what's wrong with you people. I know, what I'm doing."
Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #48 on: October 29, 2007, 08:21:01 AM »

Maddie, I think people forget that these clubs were holes in the wall, since many of these musicians couldn't play anywhere else.  The clubs have become immortalized, so I think a lot of persons have grand images of clubs like the Vanguard, but this picture presents a very real portrait,

Logged
chipstern
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1968


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2007, 05:18:03 PM »

I would never have guessed that Lee Morgan was only in his twenties when I knew him. He seemed much more mature. But of course he wasnt; that's why he died so early.

Lee Morgan debuted with the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band when he was 18.  He was shot down by the common law wife he had abandoned at Slugs (now NEW RICAN VILLAGE) when he was 33.  He had a bad heroin habit, she helped him through it, and after kicking and resuming his career, he left her.  She did not do jail time. 

Bunny Berigan, of "I Can't Get Started" fame, had a problem with alcohol, and passed at 33. 

Bubber Miley, father of the Ellington jungle sound trumpet growl, succumbed to TB (complicated by his alcohol abuse) at 29. 



Bix Beiderbecke always had a weak constitution, even as a boy, and succumbed to alcoholism at 28. 

Fats Navarro passed away from TB (complicated by a heroin habit) when he was 26. 

Clifford Brown died in a car crash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike when he was 25. 



Booker Little died of uremia when he was 23.  Both Little and Brown had established a dynamic working relationship with drummer Max Roach. 



Worth noting that the great Clark Terry is still with us, and performed regularly up through his 87th birthday before health concerns finally precluded public appearances, while Doc Cheatham did his best work after he was 70, and was an active performaer straight through his 91st birthday. 
« Last Edit: October 31, 2007, 05:24:13 PM by chipstern » Logged
rmdig
Guest

« Reply #50 on: November 10, 2007, 12:13:26 PM »

Question for jazz fans.  George and Ira Gershwin wrote How Long Has This Been Going On?  Arthur Herzog and Billie Holiday are credited with writing God Bless the Child.  Isn't the music identical in either case?
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #51 on: November 10, 2007, 02:25:52 PM »

I don't think so, it sounds to me there is a difference in the key and besides,"How long has this been going on?" ends that phrase by coming down the scale in three notes, whereas Holiday's, God Bless the Child (who's got his own) rises on the first part of the phrase at slower intervals  and duplicates the next part of the lyric in the same direction  more definitively, perhaps slower, although God Knows,Billie Holiday could just slur it if that was what was happening or if she elongated  the "got", while the latter phrase is recapped by starting lower than before and enunciates at more deliberate intervals.

But heavens, it all depends on the arrangement. You could do most anything you please.  Ordinarily, the Gershwin has a jazzier tempo although it can do the refrain in a bluesier falling away almost lamenting not having known sooner.

Holiday, like a horn solo, where ever she slurs, is also blues, but after she chooses to either clip the sound or drawl, in the stanza:"Papa may have, Mama may have, but God Bless  the child  who's  got  his own,
who 'as got  his oww_n ",  she had taken the repeat in a descending mode.
Logged
rmdig
Guest

« Reply #52 on: November 11, 2007, 12:40:14 PM »

I've been listening to a Ray Charles cover of the Gershwin song and it sure sounds almost identical to God Bless the Child, so maybe like you say it's all in the arrangement.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #53 on: November 11, 2007, 01:55:50 PM »

Pst...the person whose records are less easily heard, I would imagine,rather than Charles who is made popular by film, would be Billie's which would be instructive as to how variable she could be. meanwhile, I put the tape of the interviews between Mailer and Grass, separately as well as together over in the Non-fictional forum, which are what led me to read the most recent Grass book, something the two writers discussed rather thoroughly comparing now with then.
Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #54 on: November 18, 2007, 12:49:07 PM »

Saw The Leaders Friday night, and what a treat it was.  With a front line of Chico Freeman, Bobby Watson and Eddie Henderson you can't go wrong, but it was young (relatively) Fred Harris who really impressed me on keyboards.  That guy can flat out play.  Very nice rhythm section with the incomparable Billy Hart and Lonnie Plaxico filling in for Cecil McBee on bass.  They carried the load in this concert, as the frontmen took turns on horn and reeds.  I really like Bobby Watson.  I have his Love Remains, which is an excellent recording.  Of course, Eddie Henderson has one of the finest tones on trumpet, but at times he seemed odd man out.  Freeman apparently put The Leaders back together last year after a long break following Lester Bowie's death.  Chico, Bobby and Billy were nice enough to sign CD's after the show. 

http://www.amazon.com/Spirits-Alike-Leaders/dp/B000MTEDSE/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1195408088&sr=1-1

Eddie didn't want any part of it. Interesting reading that he had finished his medical studies but Miles Davis apparently convinced him to take up the trumpet professionally, earning his chops with Herbie Hancock.  Eddie shined on a lovely interpretation of On Green Dolphin Street.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2007, 05:58:55 AM by Dzimas » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #55 on: December 24, 2007, 09:38:53 PM »

Dzimas,

http://news.aol.com/entertainment/music/music-news-story/ar/_a/jazz-great-oscar-peterson-dies-at-82/20071224141909990001





http://tinyurl.com/2f3tnl
« Last Edit: December 24, 2007, 09:40:38 PM by madupont » Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #56 on: December 25, 2007, 04:42:00 AM »

I saw that the Big O had died, maddy.  I was sure Oscar Peterson was in the the photo, A Great Day in Harlem, but I see it was Oscar Pettiford,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Great_Day_in_Harlem

A few are still around like Sonny Rollins and Horace Silver, but the cast is thinning.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #57 on: December 25, 2007, 09:30:28 AM »

Thus far, looking at that old familiar picture, I am able to spot only Gerry Mulligan standing next to the right hand rise of the brownstone and with Dizzy Gillespie to his Gerry's right in his usual pose with leg akimbo.

It will take me awhile, at that resolution, to make out who everybody else is, where they are.  I found it absolutely fascinating when I first became acquainted with it. It was like a "class picture" of the most unusual group of people in the history of the world of music; almost all of them from humble beginnings, had traveled wide and far, been celebrated by people far afield in foreign places, without thinking much about how unusual that had been.
Logged
bodiddley
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1931


Bring it to Jerome


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #58 on: June 07, 2008, 03:29:05 PM »

Nothing much to report, so I'll just mention that I saw a girl's shirt in the market in Shanghai which had written on the front:

Solar
Arkestra

Angels and
Demons
At Play

I imagine I'm one of the few who will see it and understand the meaning.
unfortunately it was a little thin and not the best quality, and my brother's daughters (and family) wouldn't understand it or care.

Ranks right up there with the cecil mcbee girl's t-shirt which was fairly common a few years ago.

Welcome to 2008 Jazz Fan(s).
Logged
BorisBartenov
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2717


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #59 on: June 07, 2008, 04:28:42 PM »

Sorry to hear of your recent death, Mr. Diddley.  And sorry that numbskulls keep thinking Who Do You Love is a George Thorogood song.
Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!