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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 37732 times)
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Dzimas
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« Reply #450 on: June 12, 2007, 12:53:35 AM »

I see that Mr. Brooks was no match for the combined starpower of Oceans Thirteen.  Sounds like they've pushed the brat pack scenario one too many movies though.
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barton
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« Reply #451 on: June 12, 2007, 10:27:58 AM »

Don't even get me started on the Ocean sequels.  "11" wasn't too bad, but "12" was a wretched mess, with camera work that would make Chuck Yeager get motion sick and heave his popcorn.  In "12" they try to steal something from a castle that is worth a couple mill, but use about ten million dollars worth of high-tech hydraulic jacks to slightly lift the whole castle in order to get in without tripping the alarms.  Don Cheadle's attempts to talk Brit --- pushed it into the horror genre right there.

Finally saw Sideways --- a good comedy in the odd-coupled buddy tradition.  The neurotic sophisticate on a road trip through wine country with his dufus pal.  One guy is after the finer pleasures, the other's on an ass-hunt.   What could have turned into a turgid and tedious "Dinner with Andre" sort of tabletop comedy instead goes nicely "sideways."   The wine obsession, instead of being pathetic, wins you over and makes you consider embarking on a search for the elusive pinot noir.   Payne is a genius.

 
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Dzimas
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« Reply #452 on: June 12, 2007, 10:34:32 AM »

You have to thank Paul Giamatti for that.  Hard to think of anyone else who could have made a role like that work, but oddly enough he got passed over for an Oscar nomination as I remember, and Church got a supporting actor nod.  Go figure?  I heard the sales of Pinot Noir went through the roof as a result of that movie, not to mention a boost in tourism to the Napa Valley.
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barton
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« Reply #453 on: June 12, 2007, 11:06:11 AM »

I sort of see how Church got the Oscar nom, but I don't like it.  If Giamatti gets a nom, it's for the lead, and the voters in the Academy will tend to think of the lead as Giamatti doing what he does very well, and he won't quite make the cut.  On the other hand, Church sort of comes out of nowhere (i.e. indie country) and the voters can sort of toss a bone to the independent studios, since it's only a "supporting" role.  The logic stinks, of course.

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whiskeypriest
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« Reply #454 on: June 12, 2007, 11:24:17 AM »

Giamatti should have been nominated for that movie.  The problems that I identified the first time I saw the movie - for instance, the split screen montage of wine country seemed like an intrusive advertisement for the Santa Ynez tourist board - have faded away, but the strength of the screenplay and the performances remain.  Giamatti, Church, Madsen were all fantastic.  As for Oh... well, I kept focusing on her eyebrows.  Or rather, the lack thereof.

Giamatti should have been nominated the year before, too.  I guess no matter what they do, some folks never get nominated as leads.  Which might explain Macy being nominated for Supporting Actor in Fargo.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #455 on: June 12, 2007, 11:37:02 AM »

"Lady In The Water" is a mess, obviously, but I still found it watchable, due entirely to Giamatti.  He has a real tear-jerker scene near the end, which is amazing given how ridiculous the movie was. 

I always figured that, in order to get choked up by something you see on screen, you have to be "emotionally invested" (or whatever) in the movie.  I was anything but "invested" as I was watching LITW, but then when Giamatti had his tear-jerker scene near the end, it was like boom, this guy can really act or emote or whatever.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #456 on: June 12, 2007, 11:37:55 AM »

...Which might explain Macy being nominated for Supporting Actor in Fargo.

However, it does nothing to explain how Macy lost to ShowMeTheMoney.
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whiskeypriest
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« Reply #457 on: June 12, 2007, 11:41:31 AM »

...Which might explain Macy being nominated for Supporting Actor in Fargo.

However, it does nothing to explain how Macy lost to ShowMeTheMoney.
Some things just defy all logical explanation.  Like Cuba Gooding Jr winning an Oscar, and transubstantiation.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #458 on: June 12, 2007, 12:43:42 PM »

The only "Actor" the avoidance of whose movies gives me more pleasure than avoiding Costner's is Keanu "Large Block of Wood" Reeves. 

oh, not even close...  While Kevin Costner is not a particularly talented actor (somewhat one dimensonal), Keanu can;t seem to pull off "any" role, other than his original role of Bill (or Ted...not sure)..

Although I actually like Point Break, there is a Keanu line from this movie that my friends and I still use to signify bad acting wherever, and whenever, found.   

Keanu:  "I...am an...F...B...I...agent"
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #459 on: June 12, 2007, 12:50:46 PM »

Sideways did indeed create a "rush" on Pinot Noir and I am always subtly amused when I see how neophytes moved from Merlot to Pinot Noir after hearing that it was somehow "uncool" to like Merlot.  Particularly amusing when someone chooses a poor example of Pinot Noir over a relatively sophisticated bottle of Merlot without realizing their gaffe...

It's fun to trace the "popular" wine over the last 30 years to see how and why the American palate has evolved...how they have quite literally been led by the bit to what they are drinking now...

...present company excluded...of course...  Smiley
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #460 on: June 12, 2007, 12:58:07 PM »

Sideways did indeed create a "rush" on Pinot Noir and I am always subtly amused when I see how neophytes moved from Merlot to Pinot Noir after hearing that it was somehow "uncool" to like Merlot.  Particularly amusing when someone chooses a poor example of Pinot Noir over a relatively sophisticated bottle of Merlot without realizing their gaffe...

It's fun to trace the "popular" wine over the last 30 years to see how and why the American palate has evolved...how they have quite literally been led by the bit to what they are drinking now...

...present company excluded...of course...  Smiley


Poor, sophisticated to who?

Pompous ass
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harrie
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« Reply #461 on: June 12, 2007, 01:20:55 PM »

Geez, I shoulda popped in Sideways last night.  Got it from a sale table, but have yet to watch.   However – I did watch a flick last night that I liked a lot:  Free Enterprise.   I want to watch it again, to see if it’s as funny as I thought, or if it just hit me funny at the time.

Free Enterprise is the story of two geeks, one played by Eric McCormack, approaching their 30th birthdays.  Since they’re Sci-Fi geeks and therefore fans of Logan’s Run (among other things), the 30th birthday issue does not bode well and one in particular (McCormack) is having a genuine crisis about it.  The two geek friends work in “the business” – just barely – in LA, but each aspires to fully use their geek powers to do something meaningful with his life. 

The two guys also have William Shatner as an imaginary friend; then they meet him in a bookstore and become real friends with the real Shatner.  Shatner gives the guys something – perspective, encouragement -- and the guys give Shatner companionship and possibly a way to produce Julius Caesar as a six-hour rap musical with Shatner playing all the parts. Except Calpurnia, I think.

The movie is loaded with pop culture references from Star Trek, Logan’s Run, and Blade Runner to Basic Instinct, Casablanca and Laura.  And I have to say, I laughed my ass off at some of the jokes and/or references, and I now really, truly love William Shatner.  He played himself perfectly – which I guess is a gimme; but he made himself funny, sympathetic and sort of desperate/pathetic all at the same time.  The guy must have a serious sense of humor, which I guess everyone already knew anyway.

Maybe Free Enterprise resonated with me because I went to school with some serious Trekkers (“we’re serious about this, don’t call us Trekkies”) who could convert a date into a Stardate at the drop of a hat and who wore calculators on their belts like phasers.  But the movie rang true, and managed to poke fun – affectionate fun – at a group of people I may know just a little too well, and also at pop culture in general.

Even the credits were funny, with totally irrelevant stuff thrown in among the cast and production titles.  Oh – you do get to see Shatner do a scene from Julius Caesar as a rap, and it’s really fun.  I liked it a lot, anyway. 

I’ve probably done an injustice to Free Enterprise by semi-raving about it; but I really enjoyed this movie a lot, and feel like I stumbled on a gem.  Or at least a cubic zirconium or something. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #462 on: June 12, 2007, 01:27:16 PM »

"Some things just defy all logical explanation."

Not really, it's the creation of a commodity in a town where youth and good looks are routinely rewarded.  Now you have "Oscar Winner Cuba Gooding, Jr." or "Oscar Winner Marisa Tomei" or "Oscar Winner Mira Sorvino....."

Even though none have emerged as box-office draws and all are B-listers when you can't get somebody better, younger, cooler, or hotter from TV or whatever, they are all more attractive in a superficial way as something you can sell unlike Macy or Giamatti.  That's the logic anyway, I think.
 
That's my vaugely Marxist explanation which may or may not hold water.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #463 on: June 12, 2007, 01:34:09 PM »

While I've never been able to figure out the appeal of Sorvino, I like Tomei, especially in My Cousin Vinnie. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #464 on: June 12, 2007, 01:34:18 PM »

I know very little about wine but always drank Pinot Noir, and would drink any $10 bottle of Pinot Noir over however expensive however subtle a Merlot you offer.  That may make me an idiot about wine, but tastewise I've just liked Noirs more, and don't like Chardonnay or Pinot Grigio but like Sauvignon Blanc, I mean, I agree with the proposition that Pinot Noir tastes better, like some people prefer Coke over Pepsi, and vice-versa, but the idea that Noir makes you more of a wine aficianado is silly as is the assertion that I could show you a Merlot that would blow the doors off of the average Pinot Noir.  So stupid.

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