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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 41160 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #540 on: June 15, 2007, 10:39:13 AM »

...but her synopsis alerted me to the dog-dies plot and the whole barrel o' puppies/animal rights/vegan drollery.   

Doesn't "droll" mean funny?  

Anyways, I read Dargis' review, and she seemed to like "YOTD".  I'm not a puppy lover or an animal rights activist or a vegan, and maybe I'd have seen it differently if I was any of those, but as I saw it, all of that stuff was kind of beside the point of the movie, which I found to be something you don't see often in movies.  Dargis describes it well in the last paragraph of her review:

"You can learn a lot from our movies, like how to hold a gun and blow someone’s head off. It’s more unusual to watch a film in which the central struggle is how to be happy and sane. There’s a touch of the saint in Peggy, true, but what makes me love her is that she’s ridiculously, beautifully human."

It's just the old "it's a study of the human condition" type thing, with a female protagonist about whom there's nothing really extraordinary, who's just trying to live and go to work and be happy.  It reminded me of "Ruby In Paradise" in that sense, except it's nowhere near as boring, thanks to the dozens of funny jokes and side characters.  

Another thing I noticed was that "YOTD" was the first time I have EVER seen a realistic depiction of the nonsense that comes out of a 3- or 4-year old's mouth.  And by that, I don't mean "nonsense" in the sense that my posts are generally nonsensical, or in the sense that the 3- or 4-year old is stating something inaccurately or based on faulty logic or anything.  I mean "nonsense" in that sometimes the words in the questions they ask don't add up to a sentence that makes any sense.

If you're ever around kids for any length of time, you'll know what I mean.  Try as I might, I can't come up with an example, and whenever I hear a kid utter such a nonsensical question or sentence, I kick myself for not having a notepad for writing it down, because I know I'll never be able to recall it later.  

I've seen a million kids in movies, and I've NEVER seen any of them speak realistic nonsensical dialogue until I saw it in "YOTD".  I also enjoyed Molly Shannon's character's response to the nonsensical line spoken by the kid, which is the response you or I or anyone else would give when responding to such a line, which at first a furrowed brow, like "huh," replaced quickly with a postive/cheery-sounding "Yup, uh-huh, that's right..."

I don't mean to make a big deal about it or anything.  I mean, the movie didn't make a big deal out of it.  She was just babysitting her niece, and they were walking into a store or something and the kid asked some question that didn't make any sense, and Molly Shannon responded, and then they moved on to whatever it was that the scene was about.  It's just nice to see a little shred of truth in a movie, and Mike White's writing of dialouge for the 4-year old was exactly that.

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barton
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« Reply #541 on: June 15, 2007, 10:57:47 AM »

Oil,

Regarding -- "It's just the old "it's a study of the human condition" type thing, with a female protagonist about whom there's nothing really extraordinary, who's just trying to live and go to work and be happy."  Once in a while, that grabs me, but I'm going to WFV on this one.  It does figure that in a film about someone losing their dog, the whole dog theme will be tangential, unless it's a Disney film.

Realistic child dialog, however, that does have me drooling.  Speaking metaphorically.

Having had two children, I can heartily agree about their penchant for spouting nonsense at that age, stuff like "Emma puts the tails in the blank spot.  Under the roof!  Look!  It's blank and it's not green!  DAAADD!"

I don't know if one can really capture it, without writing it down verbatim as you suggest.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #542 on: June 15, 2007, 11:02:58 AM »


Having had two children, I can heartily agree about their penchant for spouting nonsense at that age, stuff like "Emma puts the tails in the blank spot.  Under the roof!  Look!  It's blank and it's not green!  DAAADD!"

I don't know if one can really capture it, without writing it down verbatim as you suggest.

You did a pretty good job there - that one sounds about right. 

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jbottle
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« Reply #543 on: June 15, 2007, 12:10:31 PM »

I'd like to say that both of you guys are ridiculously, beatifully human.
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madupont
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« Reply #544 on: June 15, 2007, 12:16:17 PM »

>>>I would agree about this being one of Philip Seymour Hoffman's better roles. Until, I saw the John Malkovich version of Ripley from a European point of view. I always say that I'm going to read the Patricia  Highsmith books but then I never do.

I liked "Talented Mr Ripley" so much I went for the book and found it immensely disappointing. A very straightforward but bland style. Highsmith's original story is simpler. Minghella spiced it up quite a bit, adding the characters Meredith and Peter Smith-Kingsley as well as giving us a jazzier ending. (Actually, there is a Peter Smith-Kingsley who is barely mentioned in the novel. Minghella borrowed the name for a brand new character).

Yes, Minghella has a habit of adapting liberally. I just talked to teddy of Meander about what he did to The English Patient (which was fine with me). In other words Ondaatje and Highsmith wrote sparser stories that had to be story-boarded up.

I have not even counted all of the Hitchcock adaptations of Patricia Highsmith, nor for that matter looked into all her Ripley as she was first and foremost a mystery writer with a penchant for the psychology of schizophrenia that caught her interest at age eight( a girl after my own heart ).  Perhaps I enjoy that quality in Malkovich (Second City,native)but I am equally impressed with everything Hoffman studies.

Back to Hitchcock; Highsmith is best known for his production of: Strangers on a Train. Scariest thing that I ever, back in my young television viewing years. Stanger than fiction is how Truman Capote inflicted this fame upon her by telling her she had to rewrite it because it had merit. Whereupon she went to Yadoo and did it. I went to Yadoo too, but merely because I found myself dining in the area at Saratoga Springs at some exceptional restaurant either on my way up to Montreal or my way down from there, and therefore could not simply leave town without taking an Autumnal look at Yadoo.   Unfortunately, I saw it in another way, not as the famous patron of renowned writers but as a rather hideous trap that had seen better days; I caught the vibe and was glad that I did submit to the regimen.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #545 on: June 15, 2007, 12:18:18 PM »

I'd like to say that both of you guys are ridiculously, beatifully human.

I've always thought of myself as rationally, hideously robotic, BHWDIK?
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #546 on: June 15, 2007, 12:24:13 PM »


Doesn't "droll" mean funny?  



...droll you should say that...

I think it means, funny-wierd as opposed to funny-haha, although I've seen it used both ways...  and when in reference to a person, seemingly most often used to indicate someone who is a buffoon
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #547 on: June 15, 2007, 12:31:43 PM »

I just remember in "The Bad News Bears", Walter Matthau made a comment about Oglethorpe's (the smart kid) lack of baseball talent, to which he replied, "Droll, Mr. Buttermaker"...
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barton
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« Reply #548 on: June 15, 2007, 01:19:09 PM »

Jbot, as one of the silicon overlords, I am not flattered by your imputation that I might be "beautifully human." 
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harrie
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« Reply #549 on: June 15, 2007, 01:32:04 PM »

Just for the record....
droll (dr?l) adj., droll·er, droll·est.
Amusingly odd or whimsically comical.
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barton
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« Reply #550 on: June 15, 2007, 01:42:27 PM »

I find that oddly amusing and comically whimsical.

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jbottle
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« Reply #551 on: June 15, 2007, 07:59:35 PM »

Joe Satriani:  First in line?

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486576/

The appeal of the "imdb joke" is that nowhere in the address is the title of the movie, so that it either is what you think or something else...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0416243/

But what's an old anti-personal trainer like me doing tellin' you all this...
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jbottle
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« Reply #552 on: June 16, 2007, 11:41:48 PM »

Am I the only one who finds "roid rage" jokes flatly unfunny?  I didn't think so...in fact, many personal trainers around the nation have striven long and hard to achieve personal fitness in mind, body, and soul.  Oftentimes, this leads to you being in a toilet stall with another dude injecting steroids into each others ass cheeks.  First, let's dismiss the idea that the practice is borderline homoerotic, no, it's that weird bathroom stall in one of the wings of the FOOD PYRAMID, where the PERSONAL TRAINERS hang out.  Sound of mind and spirit, hey, no quarter my brother, but don't put the load on our friends in the TRAINING COMMUNITY who MAY HAVE STRAYED from the path of HOLISTIC FITNESS.

I'm going to drop a bomb on you.  Hey man, we've all been there with a needle in our asscheek wondering if that clipboard we were carrying around and whatnot really ever meant anything at all to anybody out there.

Well, it did to me.

For reasons that should be obvious, I don't appreciate the spontaneous Barry Bonds joke or the easy laughter that follows.  I feel like the PERSONAL TRAINER COMMUNITY took a shot on the chin and said, yeah, I felt that shot, but nobody PUTS BABY IN A CORNER.  I don't think I'm alone.  Sure, make casual jokes about juicing and "roid rage," let the metaphorical syringes stick where they prick. 

I'm a big tent guy.  Am I anti-juicer?  I'm not qualified to say that, I'm not a medical doctor.  I have a PHD in being me.  So, yeah, I don't think anti-personal trainer rhetoric is appropriate, even in jest.  Am I saying take it easy, man, hey, lay off, bro, you know what, not at this juncture.

What I am saying is that no matter how you work out, make love, eat fried chicken man I DON'T GIVE A SHIT, put your freak on display, but when you come down on a community, man the workout community is your friend, the training isn't just a good sweat, it's personal.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #553 on: June 17, 2007, 10:03:04 AM »

After some light calisthenics, I tore open the Netflix envelope and watched "Harsh Times", which was very weird.   Of course, I expected it to be "Training Day"-meets-something, but I certainly didn't expect it to be "Training Day"-meets-"Pursuit of Happyness"-meets-"Patti Rocks"... Imagine my surprise!!  Not so much at the "POH" part but rather the "Patti Rocks" part.

For those who haven't seen "Patti Rocks", the similarity is in the element of it's mostly two guys drinking beer in the car and talking about women and life and whatnot, calling each other "man" and "dog" and "dude" and "bro" and so forth, except I don't think they had "dog" back in 1988, so they didn't call each other "dog" in 1988, but still. 

« Last Edit: June 17, 2007, 10:07:41 AM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #554 on: June 17, 2007, 10:19:33 AM »

I thought it was going to be "American History X" meets "Spun" meets "Ticker," but I was never sure.
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