Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 34290 times)
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #720 on: June 24, 2007, 01:47:33 AM »

there's a lot there for sure...

I haven't seen the outtakes, but the one you mentioned reminds me of when he is on the street and runs into the gang -- doesn;t he ask them if they know Rafael also?
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chauncey.g
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« Reply #721 on: June 24, 2007, 01:51:52 AM »

Yes, and the next black man he sees is the doctor (or nurse) at Ben's house and he asks him, "Are you Raphael? I have a message for you..." or something like that.

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chauncey.g
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« Reply #722 on: June 24, 2007, 01:59:45 AM »

Sorry, having trouble sleeping and ain't reading correctly.

He encounters the gang early in the movie and the gang leader asks if Raphael sent him and says he's got a message for Raphael. Then later at Ben's house Chance relays the message to the doctor (or nurse).
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #723 on: June 24, 2007, 02:25:01 AM »

that sounds right...a chuckle around every corner, that movie
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madupont
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« Reply #724 on: June 24, 2007, 09:06:06 AM »


Gordon, by Edith Templeton

that sounds like one version alright...thanks

I liked the line "I shall hold you forever because i'll always find new ways of torturing you..."
Templeton made clear that she wasn't able "to admit" to writing this account,although it is her experience, which I bring up because I think harrie was the one who mentioned  going back to the scenes of Last Tango in Paris and would look at the film again to be sure of  getting it right; but Templeton knew that it was  a reality( the story of "Gordon"), she just wasn't  ready to expect other women would cop to it. Now all the time later, actually not much but, a better way to put it is, "a generation later" women are recommending this book to their friends as an insight. Up until now, she understood that it wasn't "fashionable" among "feminist writers", as the movement might have been called,and the attitude of the generation had been to condemn the acceptance of this conduct. 

Since she had written it for herself as her own personal experience, it doesn't occur to her that it is a more inclusive picture of reality  and that it isn't sexual gender identity but something more basic in individual human development which Freud had merely coded down as, one is either into dominance or submission, while trying to figure himself out (the other author's name was on the tip of my tongue, for having catalogued variants of sexual behaviour, can't recall the years of his publication but, he might have rather said it is more likely an alternating pattern of behaviour).  My rather disgruntled opinion recently is that what has happened and seemed obvious to me is that "every generation gets the psychologists that they deserve"; when compared to art, they do rather badly.  Templeton has an unusual ability  to show you immediately and clearly; certainly just as clearly as the Bertlucci film.

I find it astounding that  yesterday in writing about Last Tango in Paris, that  going on four decades later, I recalled it in images as if seen yesterday (or, maybe last week in television and internet terms, now that we deal with so many more visuals)and that I remembered the suicide as imperative to the story (and I also remembered but didn't feel ready to say it, about Brando's performance as an examination of  his own emotions on the subject, that this predates his actually having to deal with the reality in his own family ).

Just to be sure that I hadn't made up the image and put it into the plot-line of Bertolucci's intention, I went and checked the original reviews; and, all I can see is that Vincent Canby loved this film and really got it.  He devoted 14 paragraphs to praising what he saw.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #725 on: June 24, 2007, 10:18:03 AM »


  My rather disgruntled opinion recently is that what has happened and seemed obvious to me is that "every generation gets the psychologists that they deserve";


Your entire post was very well thought out.

I like this line particularly as it is a humourous way of saying it...   perhaps another way of saying it is they get what they are ready to hear.  There are various philosophies that delve into it, by I am always amazed at the phenomenon that when you are ready, more information (and specific information) often appears or unfolds to you -- even if it was sitting on your own bookshelf all along, you may never notice it until that day that you are ready to hear it and understand it.

Different thought, but maybe we could also say every generation gets the movies they deserve.

And, I don't know, although we tend to look at art differently, I might add "every generation gets the art they deserve" also. Many things have always been there for people ...waiting for them to be ready...

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barton
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« Reply #726 on: June 24, 2007, 02:12:36 PM »

Saw A Scanner Darkly and found it a strain to watch, though as usual Phil Dick's uneven (often rambling, often just pulpy-bad) writing is mended in a screenplay and nets a film better than the source book or short story. I liked Keanu and Winona, and some scenes spoofing psychological testing were clever and funny, but somehow it had a stale quality overall (which "futurizing" the 70s drug paranoia and ideas failed to freshen) and Robert Downey Jr. was just painful to watch. Rory Cochrane just settled for bad caricature and collected his check. You can rotoscope all you want, but sometimes bad is bad and there's no concealing it with funny cartoony lines and wiggly things.

Only for hardened Dick fans.

You didn't think you'd get out of this without at least one Philip K. Dick pun, did you?



 
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« Reply #727 on: June 24, 2007, 03:33:40 PM »

Any thoughts on "Russian Ark"? I just saw it yesterday and was looking for some commentary...

I enjoyed very much despite 1) I don’t a whole lot about Russian history, and 2) my habit of knowing as little as little as possible about a movie before watching. I loved the bit with Catherine and I was mesmerized by the final scene, the Czarist Ball. Just like you were right there which is the idea I guess. I immediately went back and saw the entire sequence again. The all-in-one-take method added to the effect (For those who don’t know, the entire movie was a single take. I’ll try not be cynical as it would not be difficult with today’s technnology to fake that. But I think probably real and not a gimmick either. The continuity is appropriate to the subject matter, a history.) The effect of the last scene was marred (for me), however, by the  appearance of Valery Gergiev as the orchestra conductor, who I and others will immediately recognize. They might have chosen someone less famous.   
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jbottle
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« Reply #728 on: June 24, 2007, 03:49:19 PM »

I don't think "Evan" is going to cut it at $30M for a $200 + Million flick, while suspense/noir/horror "1408," does $20 on 1/5th the budget.  Huh.  That's the problem with "high concept," it's easy to get worked up over, but it can go poof very fast.  I suppose the suits will be running for cover on the "Well, we thought Steve Carell was a STAR, and we made a mistake...," but the truth of it is that it was a bad idea, mainly because people already know the story of Noah's Ark.  Tell a different story, and CGI animals aren't cutting it. 

As uneven as Steven King adaptations are, you can still say "From the master of horror..." and Cusack is a reasonably likable screen presence, so there you go...easy dough...

As "Knocked" cruises past 100 taking in an additional 10 this weekend, you know the suits are aching for Carell to reprise his role as T40YOV, but it's a little like Titanic II or Shindler's List II:  Shindler's Pissed or whatever, I mean, I've been tossing the idea around in my head and can't think of a workable idea, I could see Carrell being involved in toy product design, and hiring all the guys that used to work at the [Best Buy] with him.....but where's the dramatic impetus of "When will they discover he is a virgin?"/"How Will He Getlaid"/"He Getslaid..."  Easy three acts, hard to figure a remake but any decent idea and people will line up just to see those guys rip on each other again...
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harrie
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« Reply #729 on: June 24, 2007, 06:32:39 PM »

Barton,
Too bad about Rory Cochrane.  I usually like his work.

re Evan Almighty -- I thought the advertising alone killed it, with the whole "from the director who gave you Bruce Almighty...."   I mean, the joke's been done, even if it's a slightly different joke. Why not call it Evan's Ark?  Or Paired Up

IMO -- and we all know what that's worth -- $200 mil is way too much to spend on a flick like that in the first place. I feel bad for Steve Carrell, but hey, welcome to the industry; nobody gets up and stays up forever. (I blame Barton's influence for that.)
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weezo
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« Reply #730 on: June 24, 2007, 06:56:20 PM »

I agree with the stinker in the advertising of Evan Almighty. I does sound like a re-run of Bruce Almighty, which I thought had a handful of cute scenes, but overall it was a dull movie. I saw in on Satellite a few months ago and probably won't watch it again when it comes back. It isn't even entertaining enough to hold me while I work at the computer, listening to the movie and watching favorite scenes.

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jbottle
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« Reply #731 on: June 24, 2007, 07:31:58 PM »

"...nobody gets up and stays up forever..."

"Never feel sorry for a guy with a plane..."

Not really, but I'm sure it's just been a blast for Carrell, and he's made a lot of dough, mostly from the unlikely success of "The Office" in addition to the "Evan" paycheck of what, $12M?

It's rarefied air and he will be as funny as the material is, typically, and also, when you're in the joke business, you don't want CGI competing with you telling jokes, it almost never works.  "The Mask" I would guess is an exception, but I never thought Carrey was very good with his outlandish characters, he has been best in "Dumb and Dumber" and "The Cable Guy," with more of a deadpan loser than an amped up fart monkey that people seem to adore, but that's me.
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chauncey.g
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« Reply #732 on: June 24, 2007, 08:26:07 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqwc51j3MO4
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chauncey.g
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« Reply #733 on: June 24, 2007, 08:30:16 PM »

Hard to believe that yesterday I didn't mention my favorite character actor (well 1A and 1B along with M.Emmet) Jack Warden. He was great in Shampoo, Being There and Heaven Can Wait especially. The scene where he realizes he is talking to Joe Pendleton never fails to bring a tear to my eye. Whatta guy.
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #734 on: June 24, 2007, 09:45:04 PM »

And Justice For All
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