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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 53411 times)
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Bart
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« Reply #870 on: July 01, 2007, 01:16:25 PM »

Sounds like Blood Diamond, then?  Report back to us.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #871 on: July 01, 2007, 03:01:16 PM »

I have to apologize that within post #874  when I made this statement
"...whether performed by other Hollywood actors in -- Inherit the Wind -"
what I had done was inadvertently overlooked that Chrisopher Plummer was playing in the current production and won a Tony(at least, I think he did?).
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Dzimas
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« Reply #872 on: July 01, 2007, 03:27:58 PM »

I think Casino Royale technically qualifies as an "African" film, since the opening is all set in an unmentioned African country with Isaach De Bankolé as a rebel leader looking to get the most for his investment to support his cause.
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jbottle
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« Reply #873 on: July 01, 2007, 04:36:01 PM »

Cool, mark it, dude, jbottle's Africa film '07.

Maybe I should make it one Africa film and one African film for '08, and neither one has to have gunplay or bloodshed, but I think I'm pretty safe that there will be "action" either way.

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jbottle
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« Reply #874 on: July 01, 2007, 04:43:21 PM »

Heartfelt congratulations are in order, an honorable besting sir oilcan, quite well done.  LFODH did 33.1 for either the weekend or long-weekend, but either way I think you almost split the bullseye arrow like Kevin Costner in "Robin Hood," again sir, huzzah.  If I recall correctly you were within 5%, which makes you the Roger Federer of prognostication.  Despite reeling in a punch drunk stupor at the overhand right, competition is a welcome smelling salt to an old school box-office fighter who dropped his left hand for a round. 
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harrie
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« Reply #875 on: July 01, 2007, 06:18:56 PM »

Heartfelt congratulations are in order, an honorable besting sir oilcan, quite well done.  LFODH did 33.1 for either the weekend or long-weekend, but either way I think you almost split the bullseye arrow like Kevin Costner in "Robin Hood," again sir, huzzah. 

Congrats to oilcan, for sure.  The number 33.1 seems a little underachieving, no?  If the park down the street filled with drunken patriotic, festive picnickers is any indication, the box office might have suffered (around here, anyway) from some freakin' beautiful weather.
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jbottle
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« Reply #876 on: July 01, 2007, 06:48:48 PM »

Agreed, though we got a little rained out today in the coastal Cack.  I opted to make kitchen sink Bloody Marys, sans the bothsig, working out nicely so far for an indoor day.  Yeah, I think LFODH did OK at 48 for the whole weekend, kind of a gentleman's "C," a bit of a disappointment but not the disaster of an "Evan" or "Rocky," not worried about "Indy" too much because of Spielberg, but squeezing the last out of a franchise will surely have it's death-knell with "Rambo:  The Quickening" or whatever...hopefully Michael Caine will be cast as he can sell a DOA sequel like no other:

"Youuuu Telllll MEEEEE a story 'bout a shark that goes hafway 'round the world solely for the purpose of refvevenge...," Michael Caine on Jaws IV.

Bruce still has a place at the table and a $100M movie this year:  Not bad.
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Bart
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« Reply #877 on: July 02, 2007, 11:58:56 AM »

Just saw Shamalan's new film, "Lint" and I must say I was terrified at several junctures.  I had not realized that the human navel was such a refuge for dangerous pathogens, nor that the hula hoop could so easily transfer disease when shared by several children.  There's a scene where the provisional government is installing alcohol vats in which to immerse the hoops (why not just ban them? this viewer wondered...martial law has been declared, how hard would it be?) and you realize that shortcuts have been taken, the alcohol adulterated.  It gave me goosebumps.

 
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Dzimas
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« Reply #878 on: July 02, 2007, 02:06:27 PM »

Sounds more like a Masters and Johnson report.
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madupont
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« Reply #879 on: July 02, 2007, 02:55:00 PM »

DZIMAS,

THE OTHER MULHOLLAND DRIVE MYSTERY  "a dead-end pseudo-noir "
"In 1959 someone blew his brains out in a house tucked between Sunset Boulevard and Mulholland Drive. "

from:
The Quiet Desperation of Superman       
By MANOHLA DARGIS
Published: September 8, 2006

FAVORITE SCENE:
"In 1951 Mr. Reeves met the older, far richer Toni Mannix (Diane Lane), a Hollywood wife made vulnerable, if not yet humble, by age. A former actress of no note, she was married to the MGM executive Edward J. Mannix, played by Bob Hoskins, perhaps accurately, as a thug in a front-office suit. Mr. and Mrs. Hollywood, with his-and-her paramours to go with the other servants, the couple was powerful enough to take their playmates out on a double date. Pets yukking it up with their masters at the dinner table is an ideal setup for the director Allen Coulter, who until now has only worked on a small canvas directing for television."

[IN FACT, HOSKINS IS THE ONLY SUPERIOR ACTOR IN THIS FILM. All of his scenes are worth watching closely for the 'telling gesture' while listening closely to his delivery of the lines, if you are interested in acting perchance to act?]

'Mr. Reeves was a smoothie with brilliantine hair as slick as his pickup lines. In the early 1950’s he was hustling hard, hitting auditions while the sun was up and cruising the nightclub scene after dark. He was trying to build on his decent roles in forgettable films and negligible parts in memorable ones, "

[it would seem to me that BEN AFFLECK is pretty much in the same situation 56 years later or as of today 57, although his  slick pickup lines are right on the button circa 1950s.  My only question is how did his character manage to not get himself killed before then in the stretch between 1951 and 1959 ? that's the real mystery.]

"Mr. Reeves didn’t have the requisite acting skills that might have led to steady work, much less marquee billing: he was a would-be star in a town full of extras with superior luck, looks and talent."

"Ben Affleck was totally wooden " says one review poster of many who gave it a one star-rating and two-star at most. But here's the kicker, Alan Coulter(we presume no relation to Anne) apparently directed episodes, I do not know how many, of The Sopranos.  Does this explain things to me, on the occasional Sunday nights when I sat there like a slouched question mark going,"Huh?".   I loved The Sopranos, part of New Jersey fetishism and strained relationships , I have known, memorialized by me; but there were some unexplainable cut-off plot-lines that directed the story nowhere at the end of episode. Were these Coulterisms?

Another mistakenly 4 star rating poster says,'Hollywoodland is beautifully filmed in dark sepia tones and bright glaring LA sunlight' - really? you could have fooled me. I watched one too many shots of Adrien Brody against that peculiar avocado green becoming over-ripe background that was the decor color of the Fifties. It is used here to create a painterly Hopper moodiness observed from a safe self-distancing in the introduction to the character's routine. While his life comes further apart, you realize Brody's P.I. is beginning to look like an animal somewhere between gangly moose and an imprecise genetic mistake who may have gangrene and you are immersed in the contagion area.

While it is true that there are some exceptionally brighter costume displays by the higher echelon of the star system and those who direct it (when holding court and not having to schmooze because they are being quietly pitched by the chosen few), the contrast with the ordinary life-style of the contract performer at home in the Hollywood Hills, surrounded by bit players lethargic at a perpetual dull party that only a sychophant would endure to scrounge a break, is for real.

"the virtuoso performance...Lois Smith as Reeves' mother." from a three-star rating poster with whom I agree.

Someone not mentioned in any review that I find, one of the stars of HBO's Deadwood, Molly Parker who played Alma Garret. Here she is seen in a supporting role where she uses reasonable economy while making her presence in the film ultimately necessary(which means she raises her visibility up a notch in command of more camera time(or,face time, as it is known in the trade; this, by the way,is an art-form in itself ) as most probably Adrien Brody's former wife and the mother of his emotionally upset son reacting to the absence of Superman when he was not impervious to a speeding bullet.

There is quite a bit of confusion as to how many speeding bullets Affleck had to dodge and which one got him. This Coulterism of make your own choice in a who-dunit is a revelation to me of why the ending of The Sopranos was such a disaster of competitive interpretations. It is as if the writers and the director decide that when they don't have the answer that they will provide you with multiple choices and you can take the blame for when their inventiveness fails them. The next thing you know is that you have been lied to right from the start re: Superman in Hollywoodland, anyway(whereas, with The Sopranos, it was only in the end).  Apparently this is a new fall back for creators who recall something about a Japanese film shown in the Fifties that was coherently based on that premise that truth is not objective.



(another pop-corn down)




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Dzimas
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« Reply #880 on: July 02, 2007, 03:04:27 PM »

Looks like you have several things going at once there, maddie, and since I haven't seen Hollywoodland nor am up on The Sopranos, I can't offer much in the way of a comment.  I liked Mulholland Drive though, even if it seemed a Twin Peaks in miniature.  Lynch has quite a fashion for cinematic beauties.  Seems that 50s film noir is his favorite genre.  I thought Naomi Watts turned in a fantastic performance, raising her up ten-fold in my estimation of her as an actress.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #881 on: July 02, 2007, 03:07:50 PM »

That should have been fetish.  Lynch also seems to love the idea of a chanteuse at the end of her rope, although Rebekka del Rio went against her character in turning Crying into a Spanish dirge. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #882 on: July 02, 2007, 10:27:38 PM »

I confess that I didn't really understand "Mullholland Dr."

But I liked it, when the movie turns and you see the carnal and visceral and mean old ugly reality, it turns on it's head from a Nancy Drew story into basically the most horrible thing your imagination is capable of...so I thought about it, but I didn't let it move me out of the idea that Lynch is a pretty painter and and "art-school girl of doom"-type.  How he is able to make movies is a greater mystery, but I'm happy for his ability to do so, I like "Blue Velvet" a lot, a whole lot, I pair it with "Blood Simple" as a sort of re-imagining of the noir from a new perspective at a time when I was sort of like, wow, I haven't seen that before, and I also hadn't seen a whole lot of movies at the time.  To go back and watch something like "Touch of Evil" you realize that there's a beautiful sickness and disease around the edge of the genre, but the poetry of putting it right in two hours makes the truth of it nearly bearable.  Mullholland is more of a film for the pencil-necked geeks at "Cinema/Not Cinema," particularly Figg-Highsmith, who recently called "Porky's Revenge" the most stalwart avant-garde Molotov cocktail to the teen sex genre in history.  He's dead wrong:  The truth is that "The Party Animal" paved the way for everybody eating for free now.
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jbottle
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« Reply #883 on: July 02, 2007, 10:33:33 PM »

"Why did we basically make a guerilla film about teen perversion, masturbation, and nudity on a shoestring budget between bumps of cocaine and periodic psycholocical meltdown motivated only by the common good and artist's obligation to tell the truth no matter how prurient and obvious?  It was a good script, so we held it together like a family."
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madupont
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« Reply #884 on: July 03, 2007, 12:04:46 AM »


I have been wondering for the better part of a page,here, what the heck you people are talking about! This is the film that I was referring to, for very good reason, look at the cast! Also it is well-ploted and delves into some stuff to do with nuclear testing that is kept q.t. Threading that theme in after the sexual hanky-panky is well established was a brilliant scheme. I loved every second of this.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117107/
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