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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33181 times)
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barton
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« Reply #945 on: July 06, 2007, 11:24:20 AM »

Yeah, I wouldn't have minded a bit of followup with SLJ.  I almost wondered, after "nicely done" shot if SLJ had sort of tried to set things up, or at least steer them, a bit.  Now SLJ can shut down that room permanently, which he wanted to do (remember, in the intro, how he makes some reference to management not taking his recommendation...).


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"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
law120b
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« Reply #946 on: July 06, 2007, 11:49:00 AM »

after i saw brokeback with jbottle, all he could say for days was how he jest cain't quit me.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #947 on: July 06, 2007, 12:05:10 PM »

after i saw brokeback with jbottle, all he could say for days was how he jest cain't quit me.

He told us he never saw "BBM", and that it was "Derailed" that he saw with you.  We were like, hey it's okay, man, but he was all like, no, really, it was "Derailed", see, it says so right here on the ticket stub, etc.

« Last Edit: July 06, 2007, 12:06:52 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
law120b
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« Reply #948 on: July 06, 2007, 12:51:49 PM »

that's funny, he told me we saw derailed too, but it was bbm, i could almost swear.
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jbottle
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« Reply #949 on: July 06, 2007, 02:37:44 PM »

I thought that OWW was that one where the Mexican drinks too much and beats the shit out of his wife, if not, and it turns out he was Maori instead, my bad.

"Derailed" was so good that I saw it five times, I think maybe once I slid over into "Chronicles of Narnia," but then went right back, immediately to "Derailed," to, uh, join my girlfriend, etc.

Then I went for Skittles.  And then Milk Duds. 
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harrie
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« Reply #950 on: July 06, 2007, 04:31:11 PM »

I'm about a day and a half late with this, but the discussion of dated sounding dialogue in older movies reminded me of Man of the Century, a 1999 flick starring Gibson Frasier.  Or Frasier Gibson.  He plays a 1920's-ish throwback Pollyanna-guy named Johnny Twennies (I know) who functions in contemporary Manhattan.  It's a very silly film, but his dialogue -- he may even say "23-Skidoo" -- stands out like a sore thumb at first.  And maybe it's that he keeps the facade going so consistently, but after a while the anachronistic terms don't scream out at you any more, they're just part of who he is.  Everyone else in the film is pretty contemproary, and some express disbelief at Johnny's whole deportment and speech; but as he's a good guy, most learn to accept him and get on with life.

I also think there's no timeline cutoff for bad writing or stilted dialogue.  When I'm flipping through the movie channels, sometimes I time it just right to catch a clanger; and often it's in a relatively recent movie.  And not just Cameron Crowe ones.   

A historic favorite of our family is The Rare Breed.  At one point Maureen O'Hara tells John Wayne "You may bulldog a steer, but you cannot bulldog me!"  And we all just laughed our asses off and walked around saying that for days the first time we heard it.  So I guess the bottom line for me is, bad writing is a universal truth, and it's here to stay.  But as times and speech patterns change, maybe it's just easier to pick out in some things than others.   Or not.
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harrie
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« Reply #951 on: July 06, 2007, 04:40:05 PM »

And I watched The Magdalene Sisters the other night.  Based on the real Magdalene Laundries in Ireland that closed in the mid-1990s, it was the dramatized story of four real (I think) girls who were sent there for various offenses (ranging from unwed motherhood to flirting with boys).  It was quite disturbing and very sad, but totally riveting. To me anyway.  It was so not pretty, but I'd watch it again for the performances alone.  And of course for the big "fuck you" scene at the end.   So that was a 2002 flick; eventually I'll work my way up to something contemporary.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #952 on: July 06, 2007, 05:16:58 PM »




*Summaries give generally more about a movie than I want to know about a film and I try to go as cold turkey as I can when choosing a film. Recently I saw a movie knowing nothing about it going in and then read the plot summary on Neflix. I was amazed. I went back through the movie and made notes as to when the main points given in the summary actually became known to the viewer as the movie progressed. There were five points made in the summary. The first one did not make itself known until 21 minutes into the movie. The next, at 44 minutes.  You had to get to 67 minutes into a 114 minute movie for the last piece of information given in the plot summary to reveal  itself. Clearly, this is knowing too much for too long.  I’m sure a moviemaker does not make the assumption that the viewer is aware of the plot beforehand.  Therefore (I would think) a great deal of care is taken at the exposition stage. All this care and hard work is for nought if we are told in advance. I want the movie to reveal itself to me, and I would think that's the way the moviemaker would want it as well. 

[/quote]

This is a great point.  The same could be said for watching previews - sometimes they just give away too much and the studio allows this in the name of marketing...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #953 on: July 06, 2007, 05:29:42 PM »

My wife can't stand to watch old movies with me--for the same reasons most of you have mentioned...  I guess to each his (or her own)

I'm a big history buff and I love watching old movies precisely because they give you some insight to what things were really like - while not perfect, let's face it you're 50 years (or whatever) "closer to the source."  Yes, it could have been stilted writing, but it was still part of the culture of the day to be sure.   I'm a bit more put off by the complete lack of concern for factual accuracy in very old movies -- they obviously went with the theory that no one will know the difference so why bother with research or accurate casting, etc...  For the first eight years of my life, I thought Native Americans looked like Caucasians with really good tans.  When I met my first "American Indian" face to face, I was shocked.   ...and I'm even part Native American (though a small part).

One of my all time favorite "OLD" movies is The Philadelphia Experiment.  You get a whole new appreciation for Katherine Hepburn the first time you see that one...



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desdemona222b
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« Reply #954 on: July 06, 2007, 06:34:26 PM »

And I watched The Magdalene Sisters the other night.  Based on the real Magdalene Laundries in Ireland that closed in the mid-1990s, it was the dramatized story of four real (I think) girls who were sent there for various offenses (ranging from unwed motherhood to flirting with boys).  It was quite disturbing and very sad, but totally riveting. To me anyway.  It was so not pretty, but I'd watch it again for the performances alone.  And of course for the big "fuck you" scene at the end.   So that was a 2002 flick; eventually I'll work my way up to something contemporary.

I thought that movie was really gut-wrenching, too.   What was the name of the character at the nunnery who was finally committed to an asylum?  God she was good in that movie.
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madupont
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« Reply #955 on: July 06, 2007, 06:42:11 PM »

trojanhorse, #965

You are thinking of The Philadelphia Story, directed by George Cukor. The Experiment by that name was strictly tv.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #956 on: July 06, 2007, 06:54:34 PM »

trojanhorse, #965

You are thinking of The Philadelphia Story, directed by George Cukor. The Experiment by that name was strictly tv.

Sorry...you are absolutley correct.  I've not seen it in probably 10-15 years...
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harrie
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« Reply #957 on: July 06, 2007, 07:07:07 PM »

I thought that movie was really gut-wrenching, too.   What was the name of the character at the nunnery who was finally committed to an asylum?  God she was good in that movie.

Crispina was the poor girl.  Played by Eileen (I think?) Walsh.  I haven't seen her in anything else; but if I see her name in credits, I'd definitely check it out just based on her being in it.  The girl who played Bernadette looked really familiar to me, but the only credit I recognized was Fairy #1 in Ella Enchanted; I thought she was excellent, too. Not to mention beautiful.
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harrie
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« Reply #958 on: July 06, 2007, 07:21:19 PM »

That was Eileen Walsh who played Crispina.  Her first credit is The Van, which I've been hoping to see but I think figured out for some reason I will not on TV -- maybe some rights tie-up or something.  The Van is part three of a trilogy of sorts, The Commitments and The Snapper being the other parts.   http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0909626/ 

Nora-Jane Noone was Bernadette.  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1172901/ 

And it was apparently James Stewart to whom Maureen O'Hara spoke the "bulldog" line -- my bad. Whenever I think of O'Hara, I guess I automatically go to John Wayne. 

And The Philadelphia Story -- much as I love it -- contains one of those script things that drives me nuts.  It's that whole "My she was yar..."  and "Am I yar..."  and stuff.  It's just so affected sounding, IMHO.   

Also, with Sabrina (the Holden/Hepburn/Bogart one) I'm sooo there with the whole story, right up to the boardroom scene where Bogart punches Holden and Holden says "See? You do love her."  It just sounds so stupid to me.  With all the clever lines Holden had during the movie, he couldn't come up with something better?  And I'm saying Holden as in his character, David, and whoever wrote the script.  I know Holden can't be held responsible, but he's my frame of reference.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #959 on: July 06, 2007, 07:54:40 PM »


And The Philadelphia Story -- much as I love it -- contains one of those script things that drives me nuts.  It's that whole "My she was yar..."  and "Am I yar..."  and stuff.  It's just so affected sounding, IMHO.   



Ok, but haven't you had the experience of being around technical professionals in a field (be it medical, or engineering, or accounting or whatever) where two people are communicating with each other and you don't have any idea what they are talking about?

Or of two people from a different socio-economic status than yourself communicating in a language you don't understand (whether you consider them to be above or below your station)?

Once in awhile you may have the feeling that they are doing it on purpose to try to impress onlookers or whatever (therefore are "affected") but clearly there are different terms that evolve and apply within different groups. That's just the nature of the world isn't it?

I used to do quite a lot of sailing so I am certainly familiar with the expression "yar" but have to admit, I never heard it used in normal conversation -- but then, I didn't belong to the social elite in the 1930's -- and I don't personally know anyone that did, so it isn't my place to make the call as to whether that might have been commonplace in those circles.   Anymore than someone 70 years from now will quite get the subtleties of someone calling a thin person "Phat" in a movie made in this era.

Personally, I think it was just a mechanism the writers used to emphasize the difference in "class status" between Jimmie Stewart's character and Hepburn's.  It probably "was" affected, but it still tells you something about the times and about the writers of the times -- if nothing else...  "Americans" don't tend to like pretentious snobs.  This identified her as one of those...and yet we still liked her...because she was playful and very human and flawed...and they showed us this too.

To me, the movie was meant to break down the "social" barriers and point out "good hearted" people from "mean spirited" people -- there were those on both sides of the class struggle that was going on throughout the movie...

I just found the dynamics of all the characters fascinating...we could spend days talking about what the writers were trying to do...

In fact, just talking about it makes me want to watch it again and see if it is as good as I remember it...
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