Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 51547 times)
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barton
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« Reply #975 on: July 07, 2007, 12:10:41 PM »

BTW, I checked and "Rescue Dawn" (in which the aforementioned Bale emaciates himself as a POW) is opening in a couple weeks in the U.S.  I must also note that this character, a German-American pilot shot down in Laos, is named "Dieter."  This orthographic accident would almost be funny if it didn't remind me of what Bale is doing to himself.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
harrie
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« Reply #976 on: July 07, 2007, 01:10:59 PM »

Romancing the Stone did cross my mind, in the gerund/noun movie title chat, but I didn't mention it. 

Somewhere between the late 80s and the mid-90s, Kathleen Turner underwent some kind of transformation that caused me to be a little concerned about her health.  I don't follow celebrity lives, but I have wondered if she had some kind of drug problem at that time.


I believe Ms. Turner suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, and often the medications for it will blow people up. Plus, if a friend of mine is any example, sometimes a patient has to try out a couple different protocols for treatment to find one that handles the disease effectively; and that experimentation period can be really difficult, with many side effects of various hazard levels.

On a totally unrelated note, they shot some scenes for the second Traveling Pants movie just down the street yesterday.
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madupont
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« Reply #977 on: July 07, 2007, 02:47:30 PM »

For those who believe that Billy Wilder could do no wrong, but that also William Holden was spectacular, face it--one of the two damaged that piece of dialogue with Humphrey Bogart which is an unforgivable sin. It was not I who brought this complaint to the forum in the first-place so I will not take the rap and be made the fall guy in nine forums out of ten.

See, things could be worse. How about, that Sabrina Fair played only nine months on Broadway and this is what it looked like before someone had the common sense to bring it up to speed.

Joseph Cotton - Linus Larrabee, Jr.   
Margaret Sullavan - Sabrina Fairchild   
Russell Collins - Fairchild   
John Cromwell - Linus Larrabee   (and yes, he was the father
                                                of  James Cromwell)                       C
Robert Duke  Paul D'Argenson   
Luella Gear  Julia Ward McKinlock   
Lorraine Grover  Another Young Woman   
Scott McKay  David Larrabee   
Gordon Mills  A Young Man   
Cathleen Nesbitt  Maude Larrabee
 
 Opening Night Production Credits

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization

Produced by The Playwrights' Company (Maxwell Anderson; Robert Anderson; Elmer Rice; Robert E. Sherwood; Roger L. Stevens; John F. Wharton)
 
And whiskey, I hate to disappoint you but I only bothered to look at Sunset Blvd. to find out what Joe Kennedy's famous mistress looked like and that monster Erich von Stroheim
 
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madupont
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« Reply #978 on: July 07, 2007, 02:49:31 PM »

Yeah, a favorite Wilder would be something like Some Like It Hot.
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madupont
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« Reply #979 on: July 07, 2007, 02:52:38 PM »

Also the best performance of Audrey Hepburn was Home Before Dark

In which, she lives in a darling little Greenwich Village basement apartment, opposite a  young Alan Arkin(which is hard to imagine now).
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harrie
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« Reply #980 on: July 07, 2007, 02:55:18 PM »

I think that was Wait Until Dark, with an absolutely evil Alan Arkin.
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madupont
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« Reply #981 on: July 07, 2007, 02:58:53 PM »

True, what did you think of her acting in straight drama and not as the ingenue comedienne?
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madupont
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« Reply #982 on: July 07, 2007, 03:07:29 PM »

Dzima re:#982

How could you go wrong with Paddy Chayefsky script, right from television, and Sidney Lumet!

My favourite actor in here you may not guess but won many awards --
Beatrice Straight as Schumacher's(William Holden) wife.

As far as Aunty Kate, I am fondest of her doing Eleanor of Aquitaine opposite Peter O'Toole.  As I mentioned to another poster at one time, more privately she was also "Aunty" for Christopher Reeve who later, much later, was sorry he had not been as appreciative as the young should be since she gave him his first real break by asking for him to play opposite her for his debut on Broadway. He was an unusual high power actor internationally and probably related to Eleanor of Aquitaine?

He was too full of energy to understand what she was trying to convey.
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madupont
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« Reply #983 on: July 07, 2007, 03:12:30 PM »

re:#988

harrie, are you living in one of those great shooting locations where you can't walk to the grocery store without having to take a detour?  I'm thinking about doing that again.
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harrie
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« Reply #984 on: July 07, 2007, 03:13:03 PM »

madupont,

Well, I like Audrey Hepburn period, so I've never thought about which way I prefer her. She did have the ingenue-role down cold, but I thought she did just as well in Wait Until Dark.  I might even have preferred her in dramatic roles, because sometimes the amount of whimsy that goes along with the ingenue roles kind of wears on me.  

This is strictly my opinion, I don't pretend to know anything particularly insightful about Ms. Hepburn or the movies.  This thought also applies to my opinions expressed about that one line in Sabrina, Billy Wilder (whom I love) and William Holden (whom I love even more).  Just in case anyone's interested, Holden's game preserve in Kenya is for sale.
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harrie
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« Reply #985 on: July 07, 2007, 03:18:24 PM »

re:#988

harrie, are you living in one of those great shooting locations where you can't walk to the grocery store without having to take a detour?  I'm thinking about doing that again.

No, I just drove by the hospital on the way to work, and there were a ton of semis and cones and stuff.  No detours.  The hospital's been used in another movie or two, so maybe they have the whole routine figured out.

Indiana Jones IV just finished shooting in New Haven; and while initially everyone was thrilled to see them coming, they were even more thrilled to see them go. Nobody seemed to realize that it would cause an inconvenience -- some key streets were closed intermittently or for 12 hours at a time, etc.
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madupont
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« Reply #986 on: July 07, 2007, 03:21:30 PM »

that last remark brings me to the bottom line: "resuming the limitations of American culture after living abroad, and the flexibility of moral values among the wealthy." used to convey the character of Sabrina and the overall criteria for the play.

I know. That's why I asked you about Wait Until Dark. I agree. It was just the way things were at that time; they expected you to be cute and funny. Actually, I think she played Undine in the theatre, the mermaid who falls in love with a human, before all the rest of this but there's no turning back.
 
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madupont
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« Reply #987 on: July 07, 2007, 03:22:35 PM »

Still Harrison? Now, there's an elite family.
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madupont
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« Reply #988 on: July 08, 2007, 12:40:37 PM »

I thought that I might as well hit 1000 as leave it lay there.  Comparisons of two movies could be made, one uplifting, one not, about man's inhumanity to man. (Any thoughts on the subject?)

Apocolypto was amazing at conveying our possible strength and commendable sense in having the will toward survival.  The contrasting film:The Last King of Scotland, obviously shows us the other side right from the start. Our naivety and gullibility when we deny we have a sense of privilege.

In the latter, the most interesting discovery was to learn after viewing that the screenplay was done by Peter Morgan(same writer who brought us The Queen) and I began to read the article that I'd folded aside [as teddy had said,"happens"] which tells us what he looks for in writing a screenplay). He prefers a situation when he is able to contrast the differences between two outlooks or personalities

In characterization that is simply one of the dramatic laws put in a more modern way.  Originally it was referred to as you have to have an antagonist for there to be a drama. In other words, without an agon, you would have no story.

I think it was whiskeypriest who pointed that out, beneath Kate Hepburn and male lead, this was the case. And they finally hit b.o. when Spencer Tracy arrived on that scene.
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barton
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« Reply #989 on: July 08, 2007, 01:42:27 PM »

Saw The Good German and really liked it, cloroxed film stock and all. Looked great and the 40s score sounded great and the acting was stellar -- I never would have pictured Toby Maguire, for example, as a foulmouthed woman-beating ass-kicking scoundrel, but he managed to take all his usual sweetness and light and hide it deep for this role. When you've seen Toby's dark side, you've seen something.

As a longtime fan of The Third Man, this is a skillful hommage that I won't soon be able to forget.

 
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