Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 39852 times)
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barton
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« Reply #1005 on: July 10, 2007, 09:28:51 AM »

Mad, thanks for reminding me of Shadows & Fog.  It's been some years since I've seen it, but recall liking it and your quotes seem spot on regarding its visual style.  I should rent it again.  A lot of recent Allen, of which I've seen little, struck me as self-indulgent and not that good, but I think he got this one right.

Still haven't seen Scoop, which went through the theaters here too fast and I missed it, a couple years back.



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desdemona222b
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« Reply #1006 on: July 10, 2007, 09:55:33 AM »

I watched The Good German this weekend until I just couldn't stomach it anymore.  Sorry to disagree with you guys, but I just hated it - especially Cate Blanchett, whose characterization of the wife of a notorius Nazi turned streetwalker was just AWFUL  I thought her acting was so stereotyped - and I am a huge fan of hers.  In fact, this is the first movie I've seen her where I just hated her acting.
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barton
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« Reply #1007 on: July 10, 2007, 10:04:36 AM »

Well, I saw her Marlene Dietrich thing as kind of deliberate, and I could see how it would come across as too stylized --- i.e. she's not acting, she's acting as a 1940's actress WOULD act in a role.  This may be part of the major flaw in the film, which seems to be that you can't tell where Soderbergh is putting some kind of gentle ironic distance between his recreation of a 40s film and a real 40s film, and where he's just telling a story.  When you mix the period style with a  more modern perspective, something's going to clank, and maybe Blanchett is one of those clanks.  I just skimmed over it, the first time, as the plot and visual style were enough to draw me along -- but when I think back on it, it does seem like she struck a false note or two. 
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madupont
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« Reply #1008 on: July 10, 2007, 11:01:35 AM »

Couldn't agree with the two of you more.  I just didn't want to say anything too negative about Ms. Blanchett up front (other than hinting this was all too reminiscient of: Amy and Jaguar , but without the Lesbian good humor seeing them through the worst of times) since she was in the hands of a director who was insistent that he saw things in a new way and was going to come up with the new thing (but, even if it killed her?). By the time that he did his Casablanca finale, I was unable to see why the movie had been so tauted as such a meaningful breakthrough great film --since sliced bread.   Come to think of it that is about the period of time when they began to slice and package bread (other than rye)--at the same time the Michael Curtiz film was made. 

But having Cate Blanchett do double duty as a Dietrich type and an Ingrid Bergman reject for understudy took the  intrigue out of it all. Speaking of which did you sense that the intrigue was useless as it often became in an Orson Welles affectation of keeping you going around in circles for naught?  I was reminded very much of sitting around politely and  patiently in a film-study course for would be soundmen and lady editors of a nebulous future.  It's really better to just go to lunch at Montecito and try to recall Charlie Chaplin films best remembered (which by the way, I thought about that the other day when someone mentioned well there were at least no car-chases in the old films!) but you can always go on to knoodling about Robert Downey,jr. and how well he did Chaplin before everybody springs for their credit card.
               
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madupont
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« Reply #1009 on: July 10, 2007, 11:14:12 AM »

trojanhorse, re:#1011

I think it was my lines about the war based on politics and not Buckley's. Bill was quite satisfied with himself to chide The Sopranos.  As this was nothing new, considering his class origins never had been big about having Italians in America, until the 1940s acquainted WASPS with the Saturday afternoon radio Opera broadcasts, and it was much later they learned about the cuisine of Northern Italy as a respectable menu for which you should pay a high price by dining in an urban atmosphere, I decided to give him a blowback moment of my own philosophy about killing people purposefully but randomly.
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barton
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« Reply #1010 on: July 10, 2007, 12:45:37 PM »

Anyone seen a DVD of Harrison Bergeron?  I'd like to see the 1995 tv film that was adapted from Vonnegut's 1961 short story (was recently browsing through his early collection, Welcome to the Monkey House, after his recent death, and remembered what quintessential Vonnegut the story was...).  I think there is a VHS out there, but Netflix doesn't list the title at all, so I'm wondering if it ever made it to DVD.
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whiskeypriest
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« Reply #1011 on: July 10, 2007, 01:07:45 PM »

Apparently only VHS. 

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/6303801919/imdb-button/
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madupont
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« Reply #1012 on: July 10, 2007, 02:13:14 PM »

Oh, c'mon, I remember highschool being leveled when the 1940s slipped into the 1950s. Which also meant that everything outside your own front door and backyard was not what you could suppose inducive to that but had been the culmination of what I recently called Buckley-criteria; or television-limited in our era. Maybe it's the same thing?

Then while the Vietnam war was secretly taking place to work up to the real fiasco, I decided  that I wanted to take some particular classes that would collide into the Orwell period or the War to End All Wars. To my astonishment, the younger generation sat on their hands with blank looks on their faces, while the instructor asked questions that were never answered. No one wanted to make waves and be held responsible. But I have to suppose that's why Vonnegut had to write this. I also reflect that to get it accepted by a publisher in our country, so that it would actually sell, he would have necessarily had to declare this was the result of leftist socialist prerogatives.  Otherwise, no sale, no moola.

Talk about brain washing....  Didn't George W. get his washed in this way? Which is why I had to hand it to the particular reviewer who says he always pictured the heir of the family Bush heritage in the authoritarian role.
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madupont
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« Reply #1013 on: July 10, 2007, 02:16:41 PM »

Ps. the reviews of those who posted reviews, in the majority indicated that dumbing down the level really had worked out best for you after all, as Babs said.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1014 on: July 10, 2007, 09:47:03 PM »

I just realized this should be in "celebreality," but if y'all are in the supermarket, check out the gut on Val Kilmer on the cover of "National Enquirer," he's gone a long way from being that cutie patootie in "Top Gun," I wondered where he went and I guess now I know.  It's easy for guys to lose weight though [lights Virginia Slim Ultra Menthol Light]"
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harrie
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« Reply #1015 on: July 10, 2007, 10:35:38 PM »

I just realized this should be in "celebreality," but if y'all are in the supermarket, check out the gut on Val Kilmer on the cover of "National Enquirer," he's gone a long way from being that cutie patootie in "Top Gun," I wondered where he went and I guess now I know.  It's easy for guys to lose weight though [lights Virginia Slim Ultra Menthol Light]"

One of the gossip columns referred to him as large and orange (and having his usual 'tude).
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harrie
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« Reply #1016 on: July 10, 2007, 10:48:01 PM »

I'm sorry, it was "bloated," not "large." 

From July 5's Page Six... . . VAL Kilmer "looking very orange and bloated" while
eating sushi and drinking sake with a blonde with star tattoos at Nobu in Malibu . . .
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harrie
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« Reply #1017 on: July 10, 2007, 11:06:46 PM »

And to these bozos who 1) make the news by riding around in balloon-powered lawn chairs and 2) act like they thought it up all by themselves, I have three words:  2003's Danny Deckchair.  And it's not like it was a totally original idea then, either.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1018 on: July 10, 2007, 11:25:22 PM »

I used to repulse an insignificant bother with the idea that between roles Richard Gere was known to let himself go and roll around on the beach in the south of France and Malibu drinking bottles of wine and having sex with 19-yr. olds, the phrase "the easy sexuality of a Richard Gere" always made her cringe for some reason...

...for me, I love the idea of any star, particularly James Spader off the success of timeloop or whatever to hit the weights and the treadmill for "Supernova," ultimately an 88 min. bomb but not before he kicks a robots @ss and has sex with Angela Bassett in zero- [and also limited leverage and friction-] gravity, but the two just floating there was enough for me and damn the logistics...

...now that I'm on space I recall that I recently made my brother watch "Red Planet," the most openly horrible RoT ripoff imaginable, almost, but I kind of enjoyed the whimsy of the script, "I don't know how we can breate out here [so that the audience can see your money-makers], but we're able to..."

I always like to think that Kilmer ad-libbed the "Fuck this Planet" or at least the part where he shoots the planet the bird before taking off...I don't know that the Carpenter version is more entertaining and only that the DePalma Mars movie of the same year is ultimately the more memorable and formally interesting and funny in a more sophisticated way, I guess, but I like the slapdash awfulness of RP, and the intelligence of Kilmer [who in my mind negotiates like "tell them I need 4.5," and his agent going, "Val, I told you they are stuck on three...they called Frank Whalley..." *pause* "...well tell them I want 3 and script approval or just 3 and a personal trainer..."] to recognize shit and act just well-enough so that his winking doesn't get him canned.

There's a perfect sort of closing line opportunity in the vein of what took you so long, traffic was a bitch, at his reunion with the captain/love interest, but they went with something ordinary and not funny, and military drums, have to get back to you on the right Kilmer response later," but I digressed.

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barton
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« Reply #1019 on: July 11, 2007, 11:39:59 AM »

Jbot, I vaguely remember that the year 2000 coughed up a rule o' twos of Mars movies.  I think I saw Mission to Mars, the one with Gary Sinise and Tim Robbins, and Don Cheadle as a demented survivor of the first mission.  Alien ruins found, the Face on Mars is demystified, and the science isn't overly absurd, so I found it a fairly good Mars movie, as those things go.  The other one doesn't ring a bell, so I must have missed that one.  Sounds like Kilmer is emulating Mars these days, orange and rounded and being studied by distant cameras.

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