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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33675 times)
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chauncey.g
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« Reply #1245 on: July 24, 2007, 07:11:20 PM »

I used to confuse the title of the American version with a Kevin Costner movie that we have surprisingly not discussed yet.  He played a young Naval Officer  -- it was also "Point Something"   I actually recall this being a pretty good movie also-- he had been having an affair with a girl who was mrdered and they had a partially developed poloroid of him and her and thought this was the murderer and was also involved in something else.  He had good reason to not be identified as being connected to the girl.  Also a nice unexpected twist at the end...   Don't want to ruin it if anyone wants to check it out...

That was No Way Out I believe. No point. Not in the title nor in my clarification.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1246 on: July 24, 2007, 11:05:06 PM »

Yeah, the computer guy in the wheelchair was SPOILER FOR NO WAY OUT developing the polaroid using ADVANCED COMPUTER ENHANCEMENT which takes APPROXIMATELY ONE ACT to be sufficiently developed.  You know, "Dammit, wrong algorithym again, where is Goldblum and the JWRED, I'm only George Dzunzda, fat and crippled, sure it enhances my computer-ability because the PC is always at eye level but I can't pace the floor and take dramatic pulls on product placement bottles of intoxicating liquors rumored to assist with complex math, I mean, you understand the kind of pressure I'm under, poor Will Patton offed himself before he even knew about the picture "The Postman" developing, oh God YURI.....

.....ACCESS DENIED???

Well, I'm settling in to catching up with an old classic of the "No Way Out" era, none other than the Peter Weller/Sam Elliott "buddy cop" (defense attorney/ex-cop drunk) movie "Shakedown," which is so much better than the script that it's hard to describe.  Almost every line is a cliche, to the point of archetypal kind of self-parody so close to the edge between genius and idiocy that only the Germans and Dutch have a word for it, and I don't even know what that word is.....the point is that when Weller tells the HOT PROSECUTOR that she "doesn't look like chopped liver, either," you kind of snort, but then you're almost engrossed as to how much of a cliche a movie can be.....it's like meeting a meathead that crushes a beer against his skull, you're first thought is that he's a boor and the instinct toward flight begins to swell, but then, you're kind of in awe of how good he is at being a dickhead.....anyway, if you get an opportunity to see "Shakedown" it's one of the better hackneyed action films of the era, not only does it deliver the goods, like somebody funneling a six-pack without puking, but it does so knowing that it's a pretty silly venture the whole time.  The funny part is seeing Weller and Elliott smirk and wryly deliver their way through the terrible lines, and you wonder if they are phoning it in, about to laugh, largely oblivious, or simply having fun.  It's a head-scratcher on many levels from the Hollywood screenwriter inventing street drug dialogue of NYC that is atrocious the way a sci-fi writer takes a bong hit and comes up with a "proximity bomb," you know, a bomb that goes off when you get close to it, well, "Shakedown" is a proximity turkey in it's own right, or should I say peacock, oh well, without mixing metaphors suffice it to say that it sucks and is great at the same time, smarter than "Cobra," and more unapolagetic about it's stupidity than more excusable postmodern fare like "The Last Boy Scout," if any of that makes any sense.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1247 on: July 24, 2007, 11:13:52 PM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096087/

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19880506/REVIEWS/805060304/1023
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harrie
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« Reply #1248 on: July 24, 2007, 11:33:37 PM »

harrie,re:#1248
"Have never become used to Bridget Fonda."

This makes it look like I said I've never become used to Ms. Fonda.  Which I did not.  And while I may not feel quite the same way about her as law120b, I do like her work.  And she is seriously beautiful.  That being said, I preferred La Femme Nikita because 1) it was the original; and 2) it works better suspense-wise (for me, anyway). 

Now that being said, I end up agreeing with TrojanHorse that I like each film -- La Femme Nikita and Point of No Return -- for its own merits.  I think LFN is better executed, but I will watch the following people -- Gabriel Byrne, Anne Bancroft, Harvey Keitel, and Bridget Fonda (in that order) -- do just about anything, so I can't fault PoNR too much. 

It's a classic case of Seven Samurai/The Magnificent Seven.  I appreciate Seven Samurai   as a far better film, but I'll still watch The Magnificent Seven again and again, because it's still a good story, even with its flaws.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007, 07:45:13 AM by harrie » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #1249 on: July 25, 2007, 12:33:49 AM »

La Femme Nikita original?  I seem to remember it being done once before.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1250 on: July 25, 2007, 12:35:39 AM »

"I've never become used to Ms. Fonda."

Hell, I wouldn't charge her for the handcuffs, if she'd promise to leave 'em nearby after I had been sufficently used, and that's no bullshit neither.

 
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madupont
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« Reply #1251 on: July 25, 2007, 12:38:13 AM »

La Femme Nikita original?  I seem to remember it being done once before.


Dahling, zat was zi original.
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madupont
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« Reply #1252 on: July 25, 2007, 12:39:56 AM »

harrie,re:#1270

You know how it is though; I kind of think of Jeanne Moreau as like my mother.
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madupont
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« Reply #1253 on: July 25, 2007, 12:42:00 AM »

ALL RIGHT, so The Magnificent Seven was by Larry Kasdans, right. God, I loved those days at the beach, after all the tourists went home.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1254 on: July 25, 2007, 12:53:14 AM »

I thought Bridget Fonda was pretty good in Jackie Brown.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1255 on: July 25, 2007, 12:54:35 AM »

La Femme Nikita (1990)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100263/
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madupont
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« Reply #1256 on: July 25, 2007, 01:35:25 AM »

dzimas,

I'm sick about it. I can't get the Caryn James review out of hoc. Only Janet Maslin cold refer to Jeanne Moreau as "a beauty consultant". Maslin just has too much pull around there, which we have left gracefully  behind; what did she do, tell them she'd quit if they didn't pull the competitive revue?  James is intelligent, Maslin is not.

Anyway, now that I'm over that tantrum, I forgot that Jean Reno was in there as the chief of intelligence. Tcheky Karyo is just the glamour puss of the department. One rarely does see him. But, of course this was 1991; that went fast.
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madupont
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« Reply #1257 on: July 25, 2007, 01:56:46 AM »


Hey, Ma!

Der oilcan stated, "I hope we see more of the guy who played the Stasi officer..."


I remember this conversation in this forum weeks ago but...
It really seemed that martin meant what he said about Koch's acting. That's what he was looking l at.


Herr beck3 replied, "I hope Sebastian Koch stays in Germany..."

Ulrich Mühe portrayed the Stasi officer in Das Leben der Anderen and Sebastian Koch played an SS officer in Zwartboek. I kornfused the two when the topic came up some time back.


I remember this conversation in this forum weeks ago but...
It really seemed that martin meant what he said about Koch's acting. That's what he was looking l at.

Herr beck3 replied, "I hope Sebastian Koch stays in Germany..." So, he can keep on acting and be seen again. The industry in California destroys these actors who are between one age category and another.

Ulrich Mühe,  as you say, and in the credits listed as Hauptmann so and so and so, makes me click my heels if I was a boy but, being a girl, I had a guy by this name invite me to our first school dance at Christmas season, before we left grade school; so when one hears someone pitch that title in the air, it gives you a little nervous reaction. I come from a very strange part of the country.  To this day, if we have to go to an anti-fascist session with a visitor who sits at a desk like Ulrich Muhe with the umlaut, but looks like Maximillian Schell opposite Jane Fonda traveling into the Soviet Union with money sewn into her toque, it still happens like we were in grade school. The guys answer soft-spoken questions by jumping to their feet and clicking their heels. I listen to the women behind me snicker and do these horse-laughs but it is a conditioning that you can never break.
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harrie
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« Reply #1258 on: July 25, 2007, 07:51:39 AM »

ALL RIGHT, so The Magnificent Seven was by Larry Kasdans, right. God, I loved those days at the beach, after all the tourists went home.

Unless you're joking and I don't get it .... No.  The Magnificent Seven was by John Sturges; Larry Kasdan was a tyke (10-11) at the time.  Perhaps you're thinking of Silverado (Kevin Kline, Kevin Costner (debut-ish role), Brian Dennehy, Linda Hunt, John Cleese, Danny Glover, Scott Glenn, and many more)?
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harrie
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« Reply #1259 on: July 25, 2007, 08:07:18 AM »

La Femme Nikita original?  I seem to remember it being done once before.

Quite possible, but offhand I'm not aware of it.  The 1990 Nikita is what I refer to as La Femme Nikita; that was its release name over here.  I've heard about something Italian from the '60s (I think), but haven't been able to track it down yet. 
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007, 08:13:58 AM by harrie » Logged
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