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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33777 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #1320 on: July 29, 2007, 05:52:10 PM »

jbottle,re:#1336
"But anyway, I guess Glenn Ford was the biggest thing in Hollywood for about 4-8 yrs., and I liked..."

Did you say, Carmen, with Rita Hayworth?   " I like Glenn Ford even though he has a sort of placid and boring romantic hero quality; he's not Bogart in terms of being interesting-looking, but I guess chicks dig him"

Not really. He was short, which meant he could play opposite Hayworth.  I went immediately to see the lady known as previously Margarita Cansino dance her dances, because I had seen all the famous divas step up to the plate and pitch the arias over the footlights with barely a move while singing La Habanera  or the Tavern Song,aka Meet me at Lilas Pastia's,baby,from Bizet; and I'd already been practicing for years, my zapatiado, the positioning of the thighs to not drop the rhythm and goof the beat , my arm work from shoulder to elbow and back but the wrists had to be done over and over with the adding of the long practiced castanets. Piano practice had come in very handy for the actual playing and, after the usual practice pair, had finally found a much more graceful pair of fine walnut castanets from Seville. Same with the rim on a calf-skin tambourine.

I did make the school friend who looked like John Waters replace the needle on the right track of the record so I didn't have to drop my energy level at getting the choreography as I wanted it; once you have loosened up your muscles enough, it is not a good idea to let them go to waste when you have the challenge of a technique to accomplish.  This may have been very boring for him.  But the next year I went to high-school and I have no idea where he went to high-school. Rita married Ali Khan, and the copies of the dress came out as they always do. Today they would refer to it as a Diane Von Furstenberg wrap-around but in those days it was still cut like the "New Look" in a kind of apricot coral shade that goes well with auburn hair because that was the year I looked like Rita Hayworth.

I think that they had a harder time finding leading men during those particular years, than they do now.

Ps.
Glenn Ford was also earnest; which was also hard to find in those years, The studio system had produced a lot of sophisticated no brainers unless you misunderstand that Jimmy Stewart's earnestness was real.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1321 on: July 30, 2007, 12:30:52 AM »

I don't care if Glenn Ford was short and I'm not arguing, I just think that the idea of "leading man" has his name all over it, total pro, nice work.  I don't find a lot of nuance the way that Bogey played rata tat tat scenes in lesser works but I have no prob with Glenn Ford, very handsome, very good actor.

He's one of those guys where you go, yeah, acting is easy just look at how easy Glenn Ford makes it look.

Not to upbraid the recently-deceased equine, but ACTING on the GLENN FORD LEVEL (read pro) is nothing I would presume to snicker at;  the guy is the genuine article period, and if I say he's A LITTLE BORING it's kind of like saying that your popcorn isn't salty enought.  It's not the popcorn's fault, but yeah, I had a good time today watching him do his thing and I hope his family is very proud, fine actor.
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elportenito
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« Reply #1322 on: July 30, 2007, 06:37:02 AM »

Ingmar Bergman, Famed Swedish Director, Dies at 89



Let's remember of all his films: The Egg of The Serpent which we saw in Argentina under the title "El Huevo de La Serpiente". Very relevant in these times we're living in.   The actor from the American series Kung Fu was the main character of that film. 

But that was long time ago, back in the days when we could stil identify Fascism at first sight, and a spade was still called a spade.


Vale Ingmar.
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elportenito
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« Reply #1323 on: July 30, 2007, 06:37:57 AM »

...Keith Carradin?
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barton
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« Reply #1324 on: July 30, 2007, 09:02:33 AM »

So long, Ingmar --- who made visually stunning films that I saw when I was too young to get them, and now I must go back and see Wild Strawberries and Persona and The Seventh Seal and see what I can find underneath all the Swedish gloom.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #1325 on: July 30, 2007, 09:24:39 AM »

So,oilcanboyd23.

Is somebody with a name like Townes van Zandt inevitably Italian on his mother's side? JUST CURIOUS

I think he was Texan.  I read something somewhere about how he was born in Van Zandt County, Texas, which was named after his family back in like the 1800's or whatever.  I don't think the Italians got here until the 1900's, with the Irish and the Scottish and so forth, what with Ellis Island, etc.

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barton
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« Reply #1326 on: July 30, 2007, 10:06:11 AM »

This docu

http://imdb.com/title/tt0423853/

was making the rounds of art houses in the prairies, last year.  I have no idea if it was any good.
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madupont
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« Reply #1327 on: July 30, 2007, 10:10:21 AM »

el portenito, Reply #1346

Yes, that is the movie, known here as: The Serpent's Egg. That's the one that I went to see in a German Kino and, as the movie progressed, the old men in the  rows up ahead began humming along and then singing along to the marching songs which are immediately recognisable. It was part of the "patriotic" kultur of their time and they were conditioned to respond right on cue.  I always had to fight that conditioned impulse to jump up as an adult forty years later, because I was the small child that went to sit on the curb at the first sound of the drum and the brass of a marching band.  Then they carefully educated us with the yearly springtime field exercises to martial music with lilac wreathes in our hair and a uniform look because "The Future Belonged to ...."us.

Serpent's Egg is one of the Bergmann films seldom shown, for one thing it is in moody color, clearly depicting what life was like, as the transition was made after the Munich beer-hall fiasco, by the early Thirties.  

Carradine, as the not entirely youngest member of the family who had made character acting first rate(in fact, John, the pater familias, had definitely been a star of the Silver Screen by usually playing the villain or some other menacing social misfit. Many of us in the US could identify with that by the time of the Depression,recalling our own social roots had those intense hardships climbing out of early home-steading. Every family had their ancestral "throw backs" which they wished they could and sometimes did.)anyway --

the star of Kung Fu, was a perfect fit for the role of the Jewish carnival rouster or circus performer who inadvertently, on tour in Europe from America, wanders into the serpent's nest at the wrong point in history.  I can see where you would identify because this experience was startling apparent in South America.  What amazes me is how unapparent it is to North Americans now at present.  Same crew are involved pretending to be the natural heirs to the ship of State.
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madupont
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« Reply #1328 on: July 30, 2007, 11:15:41 AM »

oilcanboyd.re:#1349(?)

"I don't think the Italians got here until the 1900's, with the Irish and the Scottish and so forth, what with Ellis Island, etc."


Just a tad earlier, in the late 19th.century for Italians who had a second wave of migration as Southern Italy was doomed or why Mussolini became a Socialist after 1912 and before the Twenties got hot. In Princeton, one of the first things that I learned, before taking cognizance of the Colonial reality, was that the architecture on campus was done by that earlier migration of stone-workers/stone carvers, who began the gargoyles found above most of the doorways of the buildings as they went up in a remake of Oxford.  The job apparently paid well enough that the Italian workmen bought up property on the east end of town, intermarried with Trenton Italians while attending mass on the Lawrenceville outskirts (where, later, Mia Farrow's adopted Korean daughter was going to college when the journalists invaded campus to discuss her affair with Woody Allen).

As they advanced, first homes in east end became rental properties of which Italians were the landlords as they used the proceeds to purchase more upscale suburban housing. I did meet one descendent of a family devoted to the placement of explosives necessary to the quarrying of the stone when the campus was built. He had lost his father in the course of a fire-works display. Residing in Princeton,in the original home, with his widowed mother, he had gone to school there so taught me the word "paradigm" which was somewhat overly used in that academic atmosphere. Somebody ought to write a book on, How to Talk Princetonian"; but, it won't be me.

The Irish and the Scots were already there since William Penn did the surveying of Penn's Woods;Scots had been living there in Mercer county since the 17th.century.  (Scottish is merely an adjective to describe things that Scots use and or wear or whatever. They know that they are Scots.) My great-grandfather brought livestock into the Midwest, not by way of Ellis Island but down through the St.Lawrence and eventually married a girl whose family tended to one of the locks on the Erie Canal. Her relatives from that side of her family still live in that region in the State of New York.

On the other hand, the Irish handled the digging of the canals along the Delaware river outside of Princeton, for mule-barges, and they lived on the Western bank of the Delaware in cottages built into the hillsides. They also had something to do with the creation of Lake Carnegie for the Scots industrialist,Andrew Carnegie who was already dead by 1919. He gave it to Princeton University as a gift for the sculling team to scull under the bridge (along Washington's retreat route back to his inauguration in New York) from their boat-house, to do their team practice.

As you probably know from that film with Leonard DiCaprio and Daniel Day Lewis,made by Scorsese, the Irish didn't have any difficulty getting to Jersey from New York well before the Draft riots of the Civil War. They also came in at Philadelphia, rather than Ellis Island,and lived in some splendor all the way from the Mainline north through the Fairmount Park area to Chestnut Hill. Philadelphia has the premium number of Catholic colleges in the US. Philadelphia's main Italian community is south side at the port and the market where Jeff Smith used to visit for his tv cooking show with Craig(?),sponsored by Fantes.
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barton
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« Reply #1329 on: July 30, 2007, 12:02:55 PM »

Madupont,

I wish that you would, when posting, elaborate a bit more.
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Donotremove
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« Reply #1330 on: July 30, 2007, 12:13:19 PM »

Barton.  Cool
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #1331 on: July 30, 2007, 12:35:14 PM »

oilcanboyd.re:#1349(?)

"I don't think the Italians got here until the 1900's, with the Irish and the Scottish and so forth, what with Ellis Island, etc."


Just a tad earlier, in the late 19th.century for Italians who had a second wave of migration as Southern Italy was doomed or why Mussolini became a Socialist after 1912 and before the Twenties got hot.

Well, whatever the case may be, I don't think they made it out to Texas until much later.  That doesn't rule out the possibility that Townes Van Zandt's mom could have been Italian, but still.
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madupont
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« Reply #1332 on: July 30, 2007, 12:49:45 PM »

Are you entirely unfamiliar with San Marino,California; and North Beach,SF.  It's a hop skip and a jump from there to Texas, if you prefer a dry climate(?)to the ocean-front and the Neapolitan living conditions uphill with is beautiful. Italians quickly covered the distance (it is their forte, so to speak, as sailors) when they came to what became the US and decided that the best way to take it over was form a big star with five points for the five Families. However, nowadays the Republicans have taken over that policy.
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barton
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« Reply #1333 on: July 30, 2007, 12:51:23 PM »

I'm nominating the Townes Van Zandt Ethnic Heritage discussion for Outstanding Digression of the Year.  
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Donotremove
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« Reply #1334 on: July 30, 2007, 12:59:17 PM »

Re: Van Zandt.  My aunt Ivy's first husband--she had three--was a Van Zant (without the "d") from Kaufman County, Texas.  Ever until she died we called her Van Zant rather than her given name.  She had three girls by him, which of course were known (to this day) as the Van Zant girls.  He proved to be a beast and Ivy ran him off, literally, with a pistol cocked and ready.

Just thought I'd mention it.  Van Zant doesn't come up all that often and I didn't want to miss this chance--as Whiskey would say.
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