Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 52691 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #1335 on: July 30, 2007, 01:07:22 PM »

barton, haven't you noticed that nobody posts in here for hours at a time. They are probably watching movies, if not at work. Movies made by Italian New Yorkers who moved to L.A.  Where was Coppola from originally before he opened the vineyards in time for the wipe-out.  The empty forums that had been directly assigned to books at the nytimes forum, stood empty as closets in which you could transact just about anything(granted you had to go off somewhere under the eaves to post on films; which, I couldn't review if i tried, once nytimes understood they had lost acute economic management of their forums to moderators who had never practiced moderation).

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martinbeck3
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« Reply #1336 on: July 30, 2007, 01:30:59 PM »

Mention Ingmar Bergman to anyone who is less than 50 years old and they donĀ“t know him.

Bergman taught a new cinema language and his pictures are its grammar. After Bergman, Antonelli,Fellini cinema could never be the same.
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madupont
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« Reply #1337 on: July 30, 2007, 04:13:01 PM »

martinbeck3,

I bet you liked Monica Vitti, in early Antonioni. (although my favourite was Il Notte, with Marcello Mastroiani and Jeanne Moreau as the couple who make up on the lawn)

I can no longer remember the Bergmann that I liked best with Harriet Andersson in it. If it wasn't The Seventh Seal, it may have been, The Magician.  It was one that was set in the remote past after they were barely Christianized from pagan Viking perspectives. In fact, is Harriet who put the toad's blood in the bread....

And why was The Virgin Spring not mentioned(when they finally were Christianized)?  Or, how about Through a Glass Darkly?
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jbottle
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« Reply #1338 on: July 30, 2007, 09:31:22 PM »

We're having a hell of a storm but the boat seems to be floating and pump working, and the cable and electricity are intact.  There is beer in the icebox and no real legitimate reason to complain.  I am watching "Truman" on the idiotbox, up until WKRP from "John from Cincinnati" comes on, missed it last night due to an untimely bout of disrepair.  I would normally be making the tinfoil hat due to the fact that I am watching the meth/schizo drama of so far zero meaning to me and utter fascination, except there is lightning overhead, and I would hate for mother to find me tomorrow executed by a poor tinfoil hat of my own design.
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elportenito
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« Reply #1339 on: July 30, 2007, 10:46:01 PM »

martinbeck3:

"After Bergman, Antonelli,Fellini cinema could never be the same."


..age is showing, Antoniony becomes Antonelly in your old onion.
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elportenito
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« Reply #1340 on: July 30, 2007, 10:49:57 PM »

madupont: Through a Glass Darkly was re-titled in Argentina: "Through a Dark Glass" (which is NOT the bloody same), in the days of military dictatorships those things and worse were done to films. Woody Allen's Bananas was underwriten "madness is in fashion" (la locura esta de moda), and so on.
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elportenito
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« Reply #1341 on: July 30, 2007, 10:50:28 PM »

...sorry, can't talk, running!!!!
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madupont
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« Reply #1342 on: July 31, 2007, 01:11:52 AM »

 el portenito,

Sounds familiar. Believe me, same thing in the US, reviewers back then hadn't the vaguest idea about the movies that they were talking about; as proof of the pudding, take a look at how the nytimes.com still is out of touch with the actual content of the movies that they are describing. It is an inability to look at it for the human situation revealed across the boards, the human emotional content where ever it is set. Thus, the gradually increased preference for movies that  are primarily set in North American and that portend to reveal values of the moment which are the primary interest of  US types which we should appreciably admire. I gather it gives our pocketbook something to which to aspire.

One "auteur" that I don't think we mentioned, whom I adored for her whacky sense of ideological humor was Lina Wertmuller. Her Italian films revealed the spectrum of things one must know about Italy or forever miss the pleasure of  looking over its history through the eyes of some of the most comedic inventions produced.
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #1343 on: July 31, 2007, 09:23:23 AM »

Maddie, I live for digression.

Bergman --- funny, on a local news station, whose staff is on the younger side, they did brief obit mentions of Tom Snyder and some football coach, but not a peep about Bergman.  Maybe Martin is right.  Too bad, he's one of those directors who influenced many others, like Bunuel.

Bad week for directors, Antonioni just died.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
lulu
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« Reply #1344 on: July 31, 2007, 10:26:00 AM »

Sad

I am as devastated at the loss of Bergman (even though he was 89 years) old as I was with Beverly Sills and the suicide of Jerry Hadley.  (It's been a very bad year for opera and film.

My favorites:  Smiles of a Summer Night, Passion of Anna, Through a Glass Darkly, Wild Strawberries.  (I have to see Magic Flute again; it's been ages and before my getting into Mozart and loving Zauberflote as I do.)

And together with Sven Nykvist, Bergman made some of the most beautiful cinematic movies (not just acting and script, but the cinemaphotography).

He left a mountain of great works to cherish.
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madupont
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« Reply #1345 on: July 31, 2007, 01:08:59 PM »

Lulu, I know this a bit much among Mozartians, and not wanting to say,"How goes it?" in my best Austrian accent. After having seen Zauberflote, what do you think of the bits revealed and also the entirety of the film when Amadeus hit the big screen with Hulse and F.Murray Abraham? Granted it was a Broadway hit. But what I really missed thus far in life and which I consider a big absence was Oskar Werner playing young Mozart.
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madupont
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« Reply #1346 on: July 31, 2007, 01:17:52 PM »

Okay, now back to basics, I know everybody here knows who Joan Didion is and her late husband John Gregory Dunne, because the two of them wrote films together, why I bet it could have been 45 years in  the same room no less, with two typewriters then two computers, etc. Not many people can say that.

Also, some of you remember Dominic Dunne, once television producer.

Anyway, I want to know if anybody here has seen a film that they all made together which is on Sundance this afternoon at 4:15, their famous
Play It As It  Lays, adapted from Didion's novel, with the impossible cast starting with Tony Perkins, whom I simply adored as an actor of classics, real classics, ever since I saw him perform repertoire, Eugene O'Neill perhaps, until he made that fatal mistake... of knifing Tony Curtis wife in the shower and pretending it was his mother who did it.  Oh, well, we can forgive anything; with the exception of those who attack us personally.
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madupont
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« Reply #1347 on: July 31, 2007, 01:20:18 PM »

barton, re:#1365

"Bad week for directors..."   That's because we don't have elegantly perceptive intellectual directors to replace them.
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lulu
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« Reply #1348 on: July 31, 2007, 03:30:49 PM »

It has been so long since I've seen Amadeus I cannot comment.  I just ordered Bergman's Zauberflote since I haven't seen it since it was first released.  Since then I've become a Mozart fan big time and just saw Julie Taymor's enchanting production at the Met last spring.

I thnk it's time to read a bio of Mozart.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #1349 on: July 31, 2007, 07:36:42 PM »

I'm sorry, but I have to -- 

Steven Van Zant = freaky-looking musician and distinctive-looking actor

Gus Van Sant = director (Good Will Hunting, Psycho [the color version])

Mad & Harrie, just seeing these two posts...I have not been on for a few days...

"Miami Steve" Van Zandt is almost assuredly Italian.  His current last name, though, is from an adoptive father that married his mom after he was born (I'm fairly certain).  Still...you are dead on that it is apparently a "Jersey" thing...it just happened after he was born.

I didn't realize Springsteen was a Dutch name though...
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