Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 53419 times)
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harrie
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« Reply #1815 on: September 09, 2007, 10:28:50 AM »

madupont,
You are correct, cachet is what I was looking for. Don't know if I typed too fast or what -- I used to be aces at spelling, once upon a time.  U Maryland was/is huge -- when I went, the on-campus population was about 40K.  So the living experience turned into a neighborhood-y, smaller, easier to digest situation.  And ended up being a lot like high school, in fact. 

From our (7th floor) dorm lounge window, if you leaned out the window and crooked you neck a bit, you could see the top of the Washington Monument in the distance, and I used to gaze at it and sort of hypnotize myself/meditate on it.  Which caused my roommate to go around telling everyone I was subconsciously trying to kill myself.  Psych majors!  And the male side of our hall was mostly Engineering majors, so when there was a power outage, our floor alone had power back on in about five minutes.  (They tapped into the emergency exit signs or something like that.)

Though there was a lot to offer, variety-wise, if you were willing to go different places on and off campus, you always -- okay, most of the time -- okay, sometimes -- came home at night to the same old place.  We had our very own wind tunnel; cows, horses and pigs for the ag people; a good-size movie theater (where I learned to love John Waters and watched Casablanca on the big screen about five times) and a bowling alley in the student union; a full-service (sans liquor license) restaurant run by hospitality management students -- your basic large school scenario.  I can't speak very well about the actual classrooms, as I didn't spend much time in them.
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madupont
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« Reply #1816 on: September 09, 2007, 12:50:29 PM »

harrie, that' the way that my youngest sister went to school with a high-rise dormitory where she could watch (and smell the canister gas rise)the student anti-Vietnam demonstrations, Mifflin Street vs.National Guard, while Dick Cheney sat around in the locker room with the football team playing poker and complaining about the ingrate hippies. His wife Lynn (premaritally) was the one going to school there however in the English department writing her eventual masters thesis and perhaps her doctoral on The Influence of Kant upon Victorian English Writers, before she began writing novels.

You'll never guess what I watched on Turner Classic Movies last night, or maybe you can if you've seen my name bandied about  as it has been; three Oscar Wilde's back to back, as he was a scintillating playwright, starting with the old version: The Importance of Being Earnest, starring the older (pre-Vanessa) Redgrave as the character most like Oscar and in whose mouth Oscar was given the best delivery. ( I could also see what Oscar saw as most attractive about writing for the theatre.)

The second was a lesser known, An Ideal Husband, starring Paulette Goddard as the femme fatale of international "diplomacy" or imitation of CIA at its worst, made in 1945, in which I was reminded, oh, yes, that was when Mom restyled her hair from early Bonnie and Clyde, to the fashionable Hollywood chignon which could be made from your own hair or purchased in whatever length(more recently referred to as "extensions")and  was best on display in this film in which Michael Wilding gets to play the suitable mouthpiece character stand-in for Oscar.

Last but not least, the non-play that became a movie, Oscar Wilde's one novel, The Portrait of Dorian Gray.  Although George Sanders is a pal of the painter and his subject, it is the ethereally beautiful Hurd Hatfield who plays the sweet boy who for some reason because of his seemingly eternal youth loses his soul to decadence and then moral decline and eventual decay. It makes me rather want to read the novel again.

I could care less if I ever saw another version of the Importance of Being Earnest after the most recent you know who and him too version. The lines are great but today's stars detract, they are too "on". It turns out that Wilde was, of all things, " a social critic " of his time.
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Bart
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« Reply #1817 on: September 09, 2007, 01:23:17 PM »

Maddie, I am a fan of The Usual Suspects, too.   

Trojan, whatever Inland Empire is about, I'm pretty sure it's not about the geographic area known as the Inland Empire, which IIRC centers around Spokane WA, right?  However, if you have a hankering to see lots of red curtains, flickering table lamps, inexplicable sitcom scenes involving rabbit-people, angst-filled Polish people, Laura Dern looking bewildered, and some weird rehash of "Mulholland Drive" that takes up the whole "people acting in a cheesy movie and then their characters become real maybe sort of" theme, then I strongly recommend IE.



 
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Bart
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« Reply #1818 on: September 09, 2007, 01:26:11 PM »

Harrie, regarding

"I used to gaze at it and sort of hypnotize myself/meditate on it..."  [Washington Monument]

Your psych major's interpretation was an odd one.  I sort of thought there was a more obvious, and sophomoric, interpretation but I'm not going there.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
harrie
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« Reply #1819 on: September 09, 2007, 05:02:50 PM »

Well, barton, that would explain the not coming home every night thing, too.  You may be on to something....
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harrie
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« Reply #1820 on: September 09, 2007, 05:47:08 PM »

maduont, I saw that the Wilde trifecta was on last night, but we had a buffalo roast going on the rotisserie so I didn't bother getting inovlved.  (Just a 4-lb roast, not the whole buffalo; but still, it took a couple hours.)

I've seen the Julianne Moore version of An Ideal Husband.  It also featured Rupert Everett; is that the you know who (or the him too, the you know who possibly being Reese Witherspoon) to whom you refer in the latest Importance of Being Earnest
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #1821 on: September 09, 2007, 06:20:12 PM »

I liked that version of Ideal Husband a good deal more than A Good Woman (aka Lady Windermere's Fan) with Scarlett Johansson & Helen Hunt. http://imdb.com/title/tt0379306/   Even the rather dreamy Stephen Campbell Moore as Lord Darlington is no match for Everett who seems born to be (or play) Wilde.  Can't wait to see the Ernest--Judi Dench as Lady Bracknell, wot larks.  Thanks so much for letting me know it's out there.

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Eva
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« Reply #1822 on: September 09, 2007, 06:23:12 PM »

Maddie, I am a fan of The Usual Suspects, too.   

Trojan, whatever Inland Empire is about, I'm pretty sure it's not about the geographic area known as the Inland Empire, which IIRC centers around Spokane WA, right?  However, if you have a hankering to see lots of red curtains, flickering table lamps, inexplicable sitcom scenes involving rabbit-people, angst-filled Polish people, Laura Dern looking bewildered, and some weird rehash of "Mulholland Drive" that takes up the whole "people acting in a cheesy movie and then their characters become real maybe sort of" theme, then I strongly recommend IE.



 

Lanky-Bart:

One word regarding IE.



AAAAAGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
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Eva
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« Reply #1823 on: September 09, 2007, 06:25:03 PM »

ok...so maybe that isn't a word.  But, you do get my meaning.
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madupont
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« Reply #1824 on: September 09, 2007, 09:03:23 PM »

harrie and nytempsperdu,

I must admit: not being terribly fond of Colin Firth, even in the "other version of Les Liaisons Dangereux. He simply could not compete against John Malkovich in that role.

The other admission, I swore I'd seen Hugh Grant try to do this as Rupert Everett's side-kick.

Strangely enough, Rupert Everett was much better in modern versions of the same cynicism that Wilde likes to  lay on people as ha,ha,funny,funny.   He is very witty, Wilde that is, but usually the dialogue delivered so rapidly that you miss half the lines and when you hear them a little more thoughtfully, you begin to realize that they are not half so funny;as all the lines together play so well in creating a character.

I also admit to boring donotremove with the rendition that Rupert Everett played--http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0369053/plotsummary

It was a novel by Nicholas Balchin,from the same era as Graham Greene. It takes some heavy acting (with none of the comedic light element of "Ernest")with Tom Wilkerson, Emily Watson in the middle,Rupert Everett. Oh, yes, title?  Separate Lies.   I think somewhat borrowed from the British playwright Terrence Rattigan's,Separate Tables.

I can see how Michael Redgrave(Vanessa and Lynn's father) as:
"Jack Worthing lives in the country with his pretty ward Cecily Cardew. But in the city, he goes by the name of Earnest ....", when recast with Everett and Firth, allows for Reese Witherspoon. Because in the Redgrave version, I simply would never have recognized either Dorothy Tutin nor Joan Greenwood.  Tutin dropped out after a good show in films, two opposite Laurence Olivier, and went back to Shakespear's heroines in the theatre. And we know that Olivier wed Greenwood
who is now that smart old lady when ever a film needs a smart old lady.

But in either case it was all in the voice of the two ingenues. The British have a habit of insisting that these roles for comedy must be done as Tutin's with a rolled tongue throwing the enunciation into the upper front sinuses where it is then modulated somehow across the roof of the mouth. It sounds very arch. Nevertheless, Tutin played the first Sally Bowles in Christopher Isherwood's, I am a Camera, on stage.

So I am assuming that Reese Witherspoon played  Joan Greenwood's role?  Nope, that was Frances O'Connor.

The ideal from a British viewpoint was to have these parts performed as if the young women were flibberty-gibbets. Something like Glynnis Johns in, The Ideal Husband, whom I didn't catch on was the younger sister whom the ideal Wildean, Michael Wilding, would eventually marry when he discerned she had hidden intelligence  disguised to suit expectations of her class in society. One shock revealed by the host of Turner Classic Movies, was that the villainess, Paulette Goddard who had been married to Charlie Chaplain, was at the time of filming The Ideal Husband, married to Burgess Meredith. Thus proving yet again that she enjoyed intelligent men.

Moving on to  The Portrait of Dorian Gray, we find this borrowed and transferred whole cloth from The Importance of Being Ernest: "Jack Worthing lives in the country with his pretty ward Cecily Cardew. But in the city, he goes by the name of Earnest ....", as a theme once again incorporated so that the painter of the portrait  has a niece whom Dorian
Gray enjoys taking away from Peter Lawton and she is so virginal that she has no awareness that Gray has no sexual interest in her whatsoever.
That's Donna Read. Figures.

In this flick, George Sanders is almost the good guy by comparison although, described as,"the amoral" Sir Henry Wooton, he convinced a quite innocent Dorian Gray that it was all right to jilt his sweetheart --
nineteen year old Angela Lansbury in her third film, petite and sylphlike with what was known as a nicely shaped derriere,which corseting brought about at the time, and an absolutely craven show-biz mom.



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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #1825 on: September 10, 2007, 08:46:55 AM »

"3:10 To Yuma" wasn't horrible or anything, but I can't really recommend it.  There were a few WTF's in the last half, and no one really seemed to be on the same page at any time during the movie.   If anyone else has seen it, please report and I'll elaborate (with spoiler alert for everyone else), because I'm hopeful that someone will convince me that my perceived WTF's are actually not WTF's, and that I'm wrong about the "not on the same page" thing.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1826 on: September 10, 2007, 09:15:06 AM »

I received Inland Empire on DVD not too long ago, but haven't yet sat down to watch it.  My wife and I watched "Blue Velvet" the other night.  What a couple Kyle MacLachlan and Laura Dern made, and Isabella Rossellini has never been cast that way before or since.  I had forgotten the cameo of Dean Stockwell singing Sandman.  I like the way Lynch works into your subconscious. 
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madupont
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« Reply #1827 on: September 10, 2007, 09:17:23 AM »

Dzimas,

The problem is having a subconscious like that.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #1828 on: September 10, 2007, 09:26:42 AM »

3:10 to Yuma -- Looking out for numero uno leaves little room for being "on the same page" with anybody else. When opportunity comes a-knockin', whether that opportunity is an immediate cash payout or a chance to prove one's character or sense of morality or loyalty, and when it is apparent that opportunity don't come a-knockin' all too often, the primordial survival instinct kicks in and opens up the door (or at least makes the attempt to open up and enter through the door). I came away thinking that the sense of not being "on the same page" was intentional. It couldn't have happened by accident, anyway. I can recommend it even though I don't think it was a great film. It's a good film. I'd like to see Crowe and Bale together again soon. Hmmmm... a new Batman meets The Joker?
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1829 on: September 10, 2007, 09:38:14 AM »

Dzimas,

The problem is having a subconscious like that.

Depends on one's perspective, I guess.  Lynch seems like a pretty healthy guy in general.  I see he has even started marketing his own coffee,

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