Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 38869 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1905 on: September 13, 2007, 03:56:15 AM »



Reinaldo Arenas

“Like all the writers of his/her generation,
s/he (I think this technique works, don’t you?)
imitated Fifo and had secret sexual fantasies
about the great leader.”—Reinaldo Arenas,
“The Anglo-Campesina,” The Color of Summer,
New York: Viking, 2000.


pound fell for mussolini—
like james fell for the queen…

evita wasn’t the only one—
borges secretly loved him too.

like many argentine aristocrats—
borges was a peron closet-case.

disillusionment sets in tho—
like with reinaldo arenas.

tonight this brief note—
scribbled in the margins.

on page 198—
the color of summer

« Last Edit: September 13, 2007, 04:19:50 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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madupont
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« Reply #1906 on: September 13, 2007, 07:52:31 AM »

Please don't pay any attention to me either. I recall being sandblasted for how film transposed books whether literary classics or fictions with unusual concepts and/or outcomes.

Some insisted that the ability to technically analyze film aesthetics on the basis of the applied relevant arts used to make film just wasn't good enough for their inflated self-perceptions. This fling got so distorting that the rumor was inferred and then bandied about that I did not know books like they did. It went something like this: oh, you haven't read anything, you saw the movie.

Especially don't bring anything factual,or historically relevant to offer insight; just ban the remarks entirely.  It seems to me that when you speak of this artist being persecuted by that dictator, or that writer pandering to the spin-off generalissimo of lies, you pretend you never took the role and suppressed as willfully. Works every time.

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ponderosa
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« Reply #1907 on: September 13, 2007, 08:11:14 AM »

By coincidence, this is in the news today and you can see what I mean about the language being more varied and much older than Tejano --


Well, yeah. The Mayans were around long before The Alamo was even built. Interesting about the "Hey! I am Walking Here" in Mayan. I wonder if Spanish speakers in Europe use the "¿Donde andas?" or was incorporated soley by the New World Spanish speakers. Is there a linguist in the house?
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ponderosa
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« Reply #1908 on: September 13, 2007, 08:14:16 AM »

My high school football team would play Crystal City every year. Ya had to leave your helmet on when leaving their stadium as rocks would fly as sure as Crystal City is the spinach capital of the world (or so they say). Of course, we would return the favor when they visited us.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1909 on: September 13, 2007, 09:51:24 AM »

 It seems to me that when you speak of this artist being persecuted by that dictator, or that writer pandering to the spin-off generalissimo of lies, you pretend you never took the role and suppressed as willfully. Works every time.

HuhHuhHuhHuhHuh?
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barton
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« Reply #1910 on: September 13, 2007, 10:59:54 AM »

Oilcan, I liked the opening scenes with the "galoot" too.  I found the whole presentation of village life to be fresher and more credible than most of what I've seen in that subgenre.  Too often the approach is stiff and trying too hard for nobility in an almost patronizing way to indigenous peoples -- I mean, why wouldn't these people do irony and jokes and pranks and such, feel oppressed by mothers-in-law, and so on?   

Puget, depth is a good goal.  Sometimes one person can dig deep, sometimes depth is drawn out through active dialog and maybe one person just gets the ball rolling.  I tend to avoid the long didactic lecture, whenever possible.



   
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
harrie
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« Reply #1911 on: September 13, 2007, 11:05:58 AM »

So in my ongoing quest to watch parts of movies, I caught about an hour of The Departed yesterday.  Gahdawful accents* notwithstanding, I really, really liked it -- no, really really -- may even buy it, if I can find it cheap.

Though I must admit, Boston fans used to speak exactly that way at Whaler games, but I think it was to accentuate the fact that they were from Boston -- as if you couldn't already tell that by their sheer ugliness.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2007, 11:07:33 AM by harrie » Logged
barton
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« Reply #1912 on: September 13, 2007, 12:18:33 PM »

The Departed would be hard for me to watch an hour of.  A great film.  I lived in Boston for three years and the accents weren't too bad, or not so much that they distracted me.  Matt Damon, at least, had the "in" on that aspect.

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1913 on: September 13, 2007, 12:36:28 PM »

Puget, depth is a good goal.  Sometimes one person can dig deep, sometimes depth is drawn out through active dialog and maybe one person just gets the ball rolling.  I tend to avoid the long didactic lecture, whenever possible.   

I know...my Eraserhead thread did get rather long and tiresome didn't it?

It made me feel guilty that I was hogging up the fourm with my own "cult movie" obsessions and Lynch-like filmic divagations. For about a minute...  Smiley

I even felt so guilty I posted a "poem" version of Eraserhead over in Poetry. Actually it turned out pretty good. That's how Robert Lowell wrote poetry -- first as prose notes.

The movie club forum concentrating on a single movie should take care of that problem and enhance both forum approaches.

Like I said over there, I'd personally like to try combining some book / film discussions, e.g. Graham Greene and The Third Man as well as Marquez / Love in a Time of Cholera. We did it with The Leopard over in the Big Apple...

The advantage of some of the classic films like The Third Man is that most people have seen it...and a discussion could be launched right away. Holly Martin's taxi-ride and lecture, for example, are good discussion points. And Graham Greene like Marquez is an excellent writer...while Carol Reed is one of the best directors there is...

Not as good as David Lynch tho...   Smiley





« Last Edit: September 13, 2007, 12:38:26 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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jbottle
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« Reply #1914 on: September 13, 2007, 05:01:02 PM »

Ups to Jodie Foster for making the riotgrrl version of "Death Sentence" with her expectedly more nuanced revenge thriller "The Brave One."  The way Gere demonstrated his je ne sais quoi in "The Mothman Prophecies" while Costner did his best "Can you hear me now?" by phoning/nearly texting-in a lackluster perf the Rule of 2's head-scratcher "Dragonfly."

I'm not sure if "Flightplan" had anything to do with "Red Eye," and possibly one I'm forgetting, but Jodie is taking over in some RoT work in that irrepressible "find me a script that doesn't completely suck" way.  I dig the survival instict Jodefo, you could be Wingering out in the midwest or looking like a transsexual like Meg Ryan's face which has rendered her nearly un-hireable.  She is the female Mickey Rourke and HE IS WORKING.

Way to stay in the game, babe, even if you have to go Ms. .45 on some cats IN THE PROCESS.

Plus,  being in a Rule of 2's with a man of the stature of Kev's ("Stir of Echoes," still better than "I see Dead People")

Now all we need is for John Carpenter to step in and let Angela Bassett start blasting freaks.  Shit I might pay gate to see that one.
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madupont
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« Reply #1915 on: September 13, 2007, 05:18:45 PM »

harrie,re:#1934  --Loved The Departed, every one of them.  Great bar-life ala Jack.  It was so satisfying to see how Matt Damon got away with the role, after the put-down remarks about The Good Shepherd over at Heffernan's Screen in the nytimes.com  (they could not get on to the concept of "aura").
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madupont
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« Reply #1916 on: September 13, 2007, 05:20:11 PM »

barton,re:#1933

I kid you not. That's because it wasn't a John Wayne movie ( I don't know, I haven't spotted out John Ford for that defect yet.)
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madupont
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« Reply #1917 on: September 13, 2007, 05:22:17 PM »

Ponderosa,re:#1930 and #1931

"New World Spanish speakers"  completely speak variants from one another, they don't amuse each other especially when it comes to Hispanic versus Latino (and then there is Ladino) in the US but there is a man coming back in another week from Catalonia in Latin American Lit. forum and as far as I can tell from the post that martinbeck  said to him, it is provincially as different from the rest of Spain as the music. I like it, the Catalan music that is.

I first heard Spanish as spoken: in Nicaraguan, when my father brought home another doctor from there in the 1940s.  We all went through a Latin craze in the US at about that time going into the Fifties. It was all La Bomba all the time.  Good thing I knew how to do all those dances before I got to New York and was taken to Roseland and the Savoy.

Also, kind of figured you were from the Crystal City area or familiar with it, telepathy I guess. First time that I ever heard it was the spinach capital of the whatever as I always thought it was San Juan Bautista in the Baja.  Crystal City is less machismo in their "machismo" than Cubans,Puerto Ricans, or Venezuelans. The strut is different, and yet Chicanos can be physically very forward.  You usually are greeted as a woman by an immense amount of flattery. Less, the "guapa" of the Andalusian, and more Ai,mujer dot-ta-dot-ta-da. I used to go to La Raza meetings and there it is very polite, civility.

For  instance, you asked about  Europe, I found this among other quotes,
"To portray Reinaldo Arenas, Javier not only learned Cuban-Spanish,but Cuban- accented English, and lost 30 pounds to better resemble the smaller-framed Arenas." from Bardem
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madupont
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« Reply #1918 on: September 13, 2007, 05:23:28 PM »

"Because this project is categorized as being in production, the data is subject to change; some data could be removed completely." reference to Love in the Time of Cholera

But have you seen Los Lunes al Sol ?
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madupont
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« Reply #1919 on: September 13, 2007, 05:24:30 PM »

harrie, got a copy of The Hollywood Reporter? I bet this is not out of turn around. But I don't bet much, literally p'nuts.
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