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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 34099 times)
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #1965 on: September 18, 2007, 01:14:01 PM »

idiot
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1966 on: September 18, 2007, 01:30:13 PM »


idiot




Oh dear me...


« Last Edit: September 18, 2007, 01:32:24 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1967 on: September 18, 2007, 04:08:32 PM »

Psssssssssttttttt.
Confidentially, my dear young man,
I do believe thanatoooopsy is a lady...
and I should know...  Roll Eyes

I made the same mistake, thanatopsy is a man and can fend for himself against the pathetic likes of kidcarter, who should stick to the football forums.



Does kidcarter have a behavioral problem or his diapers in a mess??
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #1968 on: September 18, 2007, 08:20:40 PM »

Oilcan, I think Trojan covered some of answer that I had framed in my head when I read your question about Wade's motivations -- Wade was conflicted, and figuring things out emotionally where he stood with Evans.  In a way, I thought that made a better movie, where the "bad guy" is complex and unpredictable.  It's pretty clear that his "gang" has always been a utilitarian thing, i.e. a business alliance with guys who he ultimately finds to be worse scum than he will ever be.  At the end, he's sort of feeling his way towards just being rid of the gang, and also towards having a real connection with another person, i.e. Evans.  Evans is the first person who has been really honest with him, and it takes a while to process something so...mind-boggling.


Well said.  I think the honesty is an important piece.  But I think that is just one peice of what attracts him to Evans.    There is an overall integrity to most of what Rancher Evans says and does.    Clearly Wade is not going to be used to someone just saying what he really thinks without a lot of posturing and pretense.  Evans is honest, straightforward and to the point, but he is also a responsible person that wants not much more than to earn and honest living.

I believe he is someone that Wade has very infrequently encountered -- someone he can "respect" and it takes him a while to figure out what to do with that.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #1969 on: September 18, 2007, 08:31:38 PM »

now I want to go see it again!

I want to pay closer attention to their various verbal sparrings.

I recall Wade trying yet another different tack (presumably one he's used on others dozens of times) with a little smirk on his face as if he just knows he'll break Evans down this time...

Then when he gets an unexpected response from Evans, there is a confused, puzzled look on his face as if he just can't quite figure the guy out...  He wants to mentally dominate him, and while he clearly gets under his skin a few times, these encounters are not fully satisfying to Wade, because they are still honorable responses--he has not broken him.  Another way to say it is perhaps Wade "just knows" that this Evans guy is crooked, or morally weak, just like the rest of them, but keeps failing at trying to prove it. 

This is the dynamic that I think is key...
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jbottle
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« Reply #1970 on: September 18, 2007, 11:45:40 PM »

"Gravity Sucks" has just been greenlighted by Fox Searchlight.  The story of a group of teenagers brought to NASA as a part of "Reach into MySPACE," the gang are immediately confronted by the desperation and midlife fears of the could have been's that run the engineering wonk camp.  As the competition becomes a dangerous game between battling nihilistic geeks of separate generations, a National Emergency intervenes where the best of the remains of NASA brains and chic geek hit the tarmac.  "What's the gravitational pull of silicon, dude," one manages, "I don't know, but if I get any backblow on this bonghit we could lose one of our engines..." 

"Really?"

[record scratch]

"Nah, I's just f-ing with you, holmes..."

"Holmes?

[military drums]
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jbottle
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« Reply #1971 on: September 19, 2007, 12:06:39 AM »

There:  I just pitched you a movie better than you will see all year.

The heartbreaking scene:  One of the autistic kids does a spacewalk to apply some grease to the SPACE ARM, you guessed it, it's the cry scene where she uses the last of her LORENZO'S OIL and clips her tether into the ETHER...

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weezo
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« Reply #1972 on: September 19, 2007, 07:34:39 AM »

Just watched The Davinci Code, last night and this morning, both times missing the beginning. The story is interesting, but the plot is a bit transparent. I suspected Sophie was the "missing link" from early on. I still wonder why the little snippets of clues to the sarcophagus were in English rather than an earlier language. Perhaps that is explained in the beginning, but it reduces the believability of the story. Having seen the movie, I am not induced to read the book.
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harrie
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« Reply #1973 on: September 19, 2007, 09:18:05 PM »

weezo,
You're not alone in outing Sophie early on, which happened to readers as well as viewers, if I recall correctly.   I have read the book, and it's a page-turner, but by no means a piece of great literature.  Personally, I have no problem with a good page-turner; so I wasn't angry, disappointed or whatever. 

There's also a bunch of people who had a kniption at Tom Hanks being cast as Robert Langdon; but since I didn't lovelovelove the book, I just wrote it off as Hollywood casting, even if Hanks doesn't really fit the description of the character in the book.

We didn't catch the movie verson of The DaVinci Code until it hit the movie packages we have.  I didn't much care either for or against it, but the hubby seems to like it, as he's watched it several times.  The funny thing is, even he says "I don't know why I'm watching this..." -- yet he does.  I attribute it to National Treasure going off the cycle where it was starting every half-hour or so and figure he's trying to fill the void.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #1974 on: September 19, 2007, 10:50:36 PM »

jbottle: I know not why, but your pitch reminded of Dimitri Martin's question "What is the most intelligent sentence ever to begin with the word "Dude?" and suggested answers, my fave being "Dude, those are isotopes!"
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1975 on: September 20, 2007, 01:33:19 AM »


jbottle: I know not why, but your pitch reminded of Dimitri Martin's
question "What is the most intelligent sentence ever to begin with the word
"Dude?" and suggested answers, my fave being "Dude, those are isotopes!"


This is a very serious matter of world-shaking importance,
my dear nytempsperdu...

First and foremost, the dude's name is spelled Demetri Martin.
It's not Demitri. It's not Dimitri. It's not Dimetri. It's D-E-M-E-T-R-I.

This is a very serious faux paux for intellectuals like me and
Mr. Jbottle. We're serious cineastes dontchaknow....  Smiley

« Last Edit: September 20, 2007, 02:42:40 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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Dzimas
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« Reply #1976 on: September 20, 2007, 03:16:31 AM »

The funniest thing about The Da Vinci Code was Ron Howard taking the story so seriously.  He seemed to almost religiously follow the story of the book, even with all its gaping holes, so that when translated to the screen it made the rather ridiculous chase scenes seem even moreso.  About the only thing good I can say about the movie was Ian McKellen, who seemed to have a great time as Sir Leigh Teabag, er I mean Teabing.
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barton
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« Reply #1977 on: September 20, 2007, 11:02:39 AM »

Loved Black Snake Moan -- a modern fable (at least, I take all those chains as metaphor more than literal) with moments of mad humor and profound heart and just about everything else you need to believe life is worth a try.  Lawdy!  The trailer for this is misleading, I now see, suggesting a predominance of cheesy sexploitation that is really beside the point.   Move over, Laura Dern in "Rambling Rose" -- Cristina Ricci now assumes the throne of high-voltage southern tramp.

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harrie
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« Reply #1978 on: September 20, 2007, 02:02:57 PM »

Dzimas (or anyone),
I think any director of The DaVinci Code might have had a tough time with it; and Howard's taking it too seriously isn't that surprising -- I mean, look at his work; the last "lite" flick of his I recall is Splash. 

Why the tough time, you ask?  I'll break it down three ways:  1) The DaVinci Devotees who loudly proclaimed that the movie had better be true to the book ... or else.  Exactly what did these four-eyed pencilnecks have in mind for retribution?  I dunno, but it wouldn't have been pretty.    2)  The people who thought the book rotted in the literary sense only -- not even dragging religion into the equation -- and could not fathom why someone was making a mediocre book into a sure-to-be mediocre movie.  The answer: "ka-ching$$"   3) The people who were totally offended by the challenge to religion.  I'm a heathen, so treading lightly here, as I know not of what I might speak were I to elaborate. 

Howard took probably the safest route, unfortunately treating TDVC like a masterpiece of literature instead of page-turning fluff.  And I don't mean that as a knock, because for the most part I enjoyed turning those fluffy pages.  Though I agree with your gaping holes in the plot observation; my biggest gripe was "I know DaVinci did mirror-writing; so why doesn't this esteemed DaVinci scholar seem to have a clue?!?"

Were I to direct TDVC, I might have thrown in some daylight scenes -- my apologies if there were some, but I didn't see too many; then again, I wasn't watching all that closely -- and made it a little scenic/travelogue-y, like some of my favorite Hitchcock flicks or Charade (Donen, not Hitchcock, I know).  But that's because I'm big on the "I'll never see this in person, so seeing it on the movie screen is freakin' awesome" factor.  And if I were to do that with TDVC, I surely would have been raked over the coals, just as Howard pretty much was for staying true to the book. And also just because it's fun.

Just my thoughts. Or what passes for them.
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jbottle
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« Reply #1979 on: September 20, 2007, 05:30:40 PM »

Is "Dude, those are isotopes..." from the Reeves/Freeman one?, or just a joke?
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