Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
July 23, 2018, 09:42:02 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 131 132 [133] 134 135 ... 304
  Print  
Author Topic: Movies  (Read 53433 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1980 on: September 20, 2007, 11:42:32 PM »

Harrie, I admit I was curious after reading the book,so picked up Holy Blood, Holy Grail, which turned me off completely to this wild whodunit.  Seems the authors of the books had followed phony leads set by a mad Frenchman who claimed he was an heir to the Merogovian line, and therefor the rightful King of France.  I'm surprised anyone takes any of this stuff seriously, but as you say the book has its fair shair of devotees.  Reminds me a bit of the Celestine Prophecy. 

Anyway, Howard wasn't the one to direct a movie like this.  He played it by the numbers, when the studio should have gotten someone who would have said to hell with the crazy story, I've got some good characters here, let's have some fun! 
« Last Edit: September 21, 2007, 04:29:35 AM by Dzimas » Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1981 on: September 21, 2007, 04:31:23 AM »

Barton, have you seen any of Tom Davenport's films?

http://www.davenportfilms.com/

Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1982 on: September 21, 2007, 09:31:53 AM »

dzimas,(small d, on this one), when you really think about it, you know it is Merovingian. 

My remark will become self-explanatory, momentarily....
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1983 on: September 21, 2007, 10:17:39 AM »

harrie,

Now that we are almost out of the ten days, and I did collect some great recipes, maybe, or at least found some new/old angles, allow me to wish you a belated L'shana Tovah.

But,with DaVinci Code still on everybody's mind, let me not be the last to say that when I tried to watch it, it put me to sleep, literally. I never went back.

Anybody can make a movie, and let's face it some of us would have liked to get a good look at St.Sulpice before the place crumbles as one could push and it could fall down the hill.   Which means that the real blame for this fiasco in American popularity playing to the lowest demographic is entirely due to Brown who really hyped himself as a writer.  As Dzimas discovered there is also an entire UK cottage industry of little book shops tucked into a front-room with windows, over which is a sign "occult and religious/mysteries"; the British have been suckers for this reading matter since, well, Arthur came out of the woods, how else would they have enticed a major phenomenon such as Sir Ian McKellan to participate in this project.   The book "Holy... whatever" was very big on the "to read list"(and they read it stem to stern)of such worthies as melsme aka danielthree and whiskeypriest's favourite creative writing heroine,isabel_k.      Don't get me wrong, the latter had some very appropriate devotion to the great women writers of British descent; but, it is true, that she went so far as to spend a vacation traveling to the tourist regions of the southern French landscape which maintains auberges catering to the British who are just curious about the defrocked Cure who had a run down somewhat ancient church and rectory in need of repair but who got so carried away he built --kind of a fortress to ambition which is not supposed to be a cardinal virtue of the clergy.

Now, I've said all this, to ask if you were aware  that bummer, as the outcome of Brown's DaVinci fiasco has been for "Thinking Americans", Parisians who also like to read trash were walking along Paris streets using remote control to navigate while their noses were in their copies of the Code(they are familiar with the lay-out and the splendour of their  home-town; as well as, doing two things at once).  Right away, the possibility of this also being a money-maker for the maintenance fund of the Louvre, which some remember as a palace before it became a musee d'Art, became fabulously obvious.

To the French, it all ties together somehow; every single thematic divertissement could have been an ingenious plot for something, how should one say it: le je ne sais quoi?   If only the writer had been up to the material, every stitch of which the French  have always been familiar; it is their history.  Instead Brown wrote a trash book about things sacred to their traditional underpinnings. They shrugged, threw the book away, or gave it away, or maybe tucked it on a shelf with the other attempts to deal with the connections of the several subjects involved.

Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1984 on: September 21, 2007, 10:32:10 AM »

barton, re:#2000

Not only "southern" but Christina Ricci has long ago assumed the thone of every kind of high voltage tramp, which ever way you like it, because she plays it dead pan with a surprising tongue; and has done so, look at her repertoire, ever since she was done playing Tuesday, or was it Wednesday, in pig-tails as Pugsley's sister in The Addams Family.

To the surprise of some of us, she was particularly good as high voltage English tramp; but, I forget the title of this bizarre story-line involving a swimming pool (emptied to walk around in)  and other oddities through which she snarled and purred quite awesomely.
Logged
Bart
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2730


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1985 on: September 21, 2007, 10:38:19 AM »

Madu -- Haven't seen Ricci in that one, but will look for it.  I'm going to imdb her, because I can't remember what, if any, I've seen her in.

Dzimas, not familiar with Tom Davenport.  There are southern genres of film I'm not usually interested in -- I just happened to like Black Snake Moan, which I definitely see as a contender for best indie film of the year.

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1986 on: September 21, 2007, 11:30:10 AM »

I was all set to say I loved Ricci in Ghost World, then remembered it was actually Thora Birch.  For some reason, I always mix that one up.   Ricci's worked a huge amount for her age, Pumpkin being the film I've seen most recently; I think it's billed as a comedy, but it's one of those comedies that I find hugely depressing for a good portion of the flick.  And she was very good in Monster -- duh on me for forgetting that one!   (Though I remember her as far back as Mermaids, when she was tiny.)  She's looking supercute these days, too -- she has a bobbed do, and she was smiling, and I had to read the caption to make sure it was her.   Due to your endorsement, barton, I am going to have to look for Black Snake Moan.

madupont, thank you for the kind words; but in the interest of full disclosure, I feel I have to mention that I'm a shiksa.

« Last Edit: September 21, 2007, 03:49:24 PM by harrie » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1987 on: September 21, 2007, 12:03:09 PM »

harrie,

Me too.  My sister was a convert.  I just happened to note a greeting to you from another poster, as I simultaneously became involved in seeing what Joan Nathan and friends had cooked up for us(none of it easy) this year.  As I told Law,whatever his number, in Food Matters, I learned my diet for the days pre-Yom Kippur(and after the fast) from Theo Bikel, once a movie star as well as folk-singer, as I always found it fascinating how the old Jewish community in New York,at least when I was there, actually brought their chairs down to the sidewalk from their apartments to sit shiva while the whole town closed down  for ten days as any telephone operator could tell you back in the day's when Manhattan still had telephone operators.

The first time that I ever saw was in childhood when my playmate's grandparents would come to visit and sat on  straight-back chairs in the yard absolutely motionless; like what was that?.(although my grandparents sat similarly on chairs and rockers but on a porch when they  had company wearing religious-garments; so, I kind of just accepted that's the way things are, except for Protestants)  He later ended up writing the legal input for tv's, Law and Order, since his father had been a defense attorney.
Logged
Dzimas
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4500


I thought you said your name was Nobody.


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1988 on: September 22, 2007, 01:45:23 AM »

Dzimas, not familiar with Tom Davenport.  There are southern genres of film I'm not usually interested in -- I just happened to like Black Snake Moan, which I definitely see as a contender for best indie film of the year.



I think you will like Davenport.  His are Appalachian tales drawn mostly from the Brothers Grimm.  I saw Mutzmag years ago at the Biograph in Washington, DC.  It was great to see that so many of his films are now available on DVD, but a bit pricey to buy.  Maybe they are available through Netflix or a local video outlet.
Logged
Bart
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2730


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1989 on: September 22, 2007, 01:06:15 PM »

Thanks.

Your avatar looks eerily familiar.

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1990 on: September 22, 2007, 01:15:29 PM »

barton, well, you know how it is, by now. You can get defined as having an anima, or an animus, or an enema. Just for sensing that an avatar looks eerily familiar.

Which brings up another point. Lucky you know about eerie. I have a problem with gauge and gouge.
Logged
Bart
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2730


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1991 on: September 22, 2007, 01:40:02 PM »

Madupont, your above post lacks your usual clarity.  I take it that you are referring to Jung's concept of anima, or female aspect of the unconscious that lies within a male.  If so, then you may be onto something, vis-a-vis the two Duchovny avatars that now appear here.

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1992 on: September 22, 2007, 02:57:13 PM »

I suspect so, after a week like this, a little clarity would be lost.  Major planets squaring off, equinox on the quiver,it's been interesting watching who folded first demonstrating their uncanny ability to devolve from being among the unevolved.  I hope everyone is practicing up for one of the really sordid,mysticism inducing, ominous Halloween contests around here.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1993 on: September 23, 2007, 01:15:32 AM »

I had the strangest thing happen tonight.  It looked like nothing was on tv but it is movie night all over the world so what the heck was Charlie Chaplin doing there in The Great Dictator 1940?   I started in on it when within 12 minutes discovered that The Black Dahlia was playing.   It was very true to the book which I read about two or three years ago by Elroy, and then tried to follow up with Gregory Dunne's.  Neither one of these writers could figure out at the time, and for a long while after, why they were writing their books.  Each chose to emphasize a different aspect but all I can say is that however you approach it, however it comes into your life whenever it does, it leaves a buzz that you can't shake.

I recall that what got me  to put myself in the way of it was a tv show about Elroy who is really wired man and has a thing about peppering a little scatology into every day as all the sex he can handle, which becomes more understandable the second time you see the follow up and what he calls the last show he will do about his hang up.

On this first occasion, there's Nick Nolte, all whatever of him, big and blond, interviewing Jame Elroy in his dark accentuating horn rim glasses with the round lenses, and any number of detective from the L.A. area, mostly retired dicks who know the case, and you get the drift that Nolte is probably getting the background and how the regular dicks are with each other and their handling of proceedure because, when  you finally read the book it is about two "cops" and a girl who I never would have imagined was Scarlet Johansson.  But then, I never would have imagined any of the other actors either.  Pardon the grotesquerie but no matter how you cut it, what stays with you is the corpse.

The present film tries to do a really good job about making her into a credible person but that's about when you begin to realize that she is a surrogate for Scarlet Johansson who is mutually a surrogate for her as is also Hillary Swank who I could not recognize at first because she is capable of going through changes and developing a body and a look that goes with the role, the carriage, and I'm staring at someone I would have recognized as D.Eugenia Casper W. S... on appearances alone although certainly not back at the end of the Forties. 

But the movie tries too hard and starts getting carried away with the comic possibilities which shouldn't be there.  If The Black Dahlia was a summer beach read paperback which would give you a nice tan, as it is thick, and finally it is so long on police procedural that has held your attention, you begin to get lost on the details of the threesome whom you just accept as they are in the reading, you are now way beyond your depth of following Elroy's clues and how he wraps it up in the scudsie world of Hollywood underground porn. Yes, that's it, when you translate to the screen with all the hallmarks of the era which really turn me on because that was exactly how it was visually, the style is right on the mark, the threesome just don't live in a cottage-house as you picture when reading Elroy but in an apartment with an exterior like something Maya Deren used when she made films.

It's a lavish mystery trip with dark lighting, even with Johansson blonde in blond surroundings to match her wardrobe, her skin is that of a blonde from the 1940s. Not exactly healthy, fading California tan, her make up and lingerie are authentic  and out of style with our own expectations but sometimes by default it reminds you just for an instant what the value was in wearing an angora sweater.

I'm pondering now whether the strange relationships of the younger characters will mystify you just enough to want to follow up, since the producer, and director have somehow nearly ruined it for you by making the other characters, "characters",weirdos. But, if you don't just accept everything about the menage au four made up of a blonde, a brunette,and Joe Friday in his youth who begins to catch folie a deux from his obsessed partner and you feel you need to know more about what the heck were they talking about with the omnipresent hooker always in the background even when she's been a corpse from the start, you'll be back dredging up information that you hope will explain it.

And yes, in a Brian de Palma film, k.d.lang  is an asset in conveying something you don't otherwise quite get about the era because there is actually less footage on the hookers than Elroy writes in order to understand for himself. In both Elroy, and Dunne, you are faced with another coincidence, the duo of men, who are brothers in Dunne, and partners in Elroy but de Palma tries to let you know that men had an unusual interest in the lesbian aspects of prostitution at least up to the mid-1950s.
Logged
Bart
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2730


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1994 on: September 24, 2007, 10:42:52 AM »

The Lookout is excellent.  A heist plot involving a young man recovering from head trauma, with fine ensemble acting and a very understated and convincing perf by Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a man who, "Memento" like, needs to write notes to himself to keep his life in order.  Also like "Memento" in that criminal types seek to exploit his deficits -- but this film is far more accessible and plausible, with a remarkable ring of truth.  Set in Kansas, but shot around Winnipeg, which does a reasonable imitation but won't fool any Kansas natives (like me).

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Pages: 1 ... 131 132 [133] 134 135 ... 304
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!