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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 38385 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #2025 on: October 01, 2007, 08:02:41 PM »

Well, it all depends which fifteen years they are doesn't it?
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jbottle
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« Reply #2026 on: October 01, 2007, 08:17:32 PM »

Sorry for the muddled post, but RDJR has been cast as "Ironman," the superhero.

The "backstory" that I referred to is what oilcan didn't like about the film and was distracting from the wit of the enterprise.  More Kilmer vs. Downey words, less Moynihan, not that she was bad, but I didn't care which bus she got off from or from where.

Shane Black continues to do variations on the buddy cop genre, and I like the evolution here, the movie is not as good as "The Last Boy Scout," and he's a competent and talented director but no Tony Scott, and barton is right that to bring it in under $15M should mean that he gets to continue to make witty noir/buddy cop films in the future.  His movies or scripts always start with the proposition that "this is a movie, and you're life won't be better or worse for seeing it, but that's why I wanted you to have fun," and then anything else that's gleaned is fine, but I like the way he embraces the light fare that '80's and especially buddy cop movies are usually dismissed for and then gives you more than he has too in terms of wit, character, style and plot.

To me, the overwrought feeling of "Jackie Brown" and uncomfortable juxtaposition of violence and wit, and the same could be said for the Soderbergh one, seemed in those two cases to suck the fun out of the joke, but comic tone is a matter of extremely personal variance, and nobody is ever wrong, but anyway, I like the Shane Black approach.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2027 on: October 01, 2007, 09:01:54 PM »

I think Michelle Monaghan and Downey Jr. are maybe 15 years apart, max.  That better be plausible, because I'm at this moment smitten with a woman who is 15 years my junior and I don't want any reality checks for a while.


My wife is 12 years younger than me.  That's why we're still talking about another baby as I'm approaching 50...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2028 on: October 01, 2007, 09:04:39 PM »


I liked "Hot Fuzz" - it sort of lost me when it went all whacko (like in terms of the motive of the townsfolk, etc.) but that doesn't change that it was full of great jokes.  I only saw it once, in the theater, and it's one of those I think I'll like more the 2nd time.


lost you in what way?  They were completly wacko...  I think there was probably some political commentary in there about hypocracy or something also...but then,  I never really worried so much about the little things...(as Bridgette used to say)
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barton
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« Reply #2029 on: October 02, 2007, 11:43:06 AM »

1976 -- Michelle Monaghan born

1965 -- Bob Downey Jr. born

While an 11 year difference is no problem vis-a-vis romance, Oilcan does make a point that it poses a bit of difficulty for them both being around 9 years old at the same time, as shown in the opening scene of the film KKBB.

As for babies, I had the whole baby thing out of the way by age 33.  The thought of getting back in that game at age 51 gives me what the French call a "frisson" -- a terrified shiver.  But some guys are more child-oriented than others, and levels of stamina vary tremendously, as well as levels of income and the correlated ability to employ a nanny. 

The classic false age disparity in movies is Anne Bancroft and Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate.  Though she plays a woman a generation older than Hoffman, she is in fact only six years older than him.







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jbottle
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« Reply #2030 on: October 02, 2007, 12:46:02 PM »

I thought it was kinda funny that Gary Cole (b. 1956) played Will Ferrell's (b. 1967) dad in Talladega Nights but then it kind of makes sense if he had lil Ricky Bobby when he was 15 or so, which is in the realm of belief dealing in rube charicature, so I just took it as another joke.  I always think it's funny when people make a big deal about age and sex, like Michael Douglas should marry somebody his own age, or, nobody believes that Eastwood should cast himself against a much younger woman, etc.  But if it's Gere/Ryder (20 yrs. apart or so) in a movie where somebody is dying of a terrible disease instead of buddy cop or whatever, it gets overlooked, so if you play somebody "cool," you should have to date somebody your own age.  Stupid, when it happens all the time IRL as well as on screen.

Oh, and I was a little hard on Pan't Lab in the other room, and need to see it again, but the first 20 min. or so failed to grab me, but it's obviously good and I just have to try harder I guess.  GDT is incredibly talented, but the "magic realism" was beginning to wear a little thin and put me in ZZZZZZZZZZ mode, but I was hyperbolic and crude, it happens.
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madupont
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« Reply #2031 on: October 02, 2007, 12:50:50 PM »

barton,
"what the French call a "frisson" -- a terrified shiver."

That was then, because it conveyed a notion of "illness,sickness, coming down with a serious cold" but, otherwise Frenchmen do not shiver but would  consider a "shudder" as suitably descriptive.

Frenchwomen on the other hand,even "then", were used to seeing those nice bottles that they picked up at the Parfumerie which described the frisson we could enjoy with some after-bath "splash"(as it is called in this country). It seems to me that the French enjoy their toiletries providing that effect. They really want to feel it; feel good, tingly.

Many, having genetically ended up with what is described as
normal to oily, as a description of skin or complexion( unless the light-skinned,red-headed type descended from the Gauls as the Romans found them), don't mind something a little astringent for facial routine or an all over refreshment, kind of a pick me up.

Naturally, you can see how this carries over sexually. Otherwise, why would Proust be so obsessed about Albertine, as so many readers seem to suppose.  By now, if people do not know that the young Proust, like most of us, had many profound misunderstandings of the nature of things, that were always being explained to him by more adult friends,acquaintances,and relatives; and then one day, he figured it out, how associations that his mind seemed to unconsciously make  had led to this and he nearly cried for joy, in fact he probably did, at the beauty of this realization and prepared to calmly die, with the realization that appearances are not everything.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2032 on: October 02, 2007, 01:10:23 PM »

GDT is incredibly talented, but the "magic realism" was beginning to wear a little thin and put me in ZZZZZZZZZZ mode...

I can totally see that, and as I was watching (and loving) "Pan's Labyrinth", I was aware of the fact that there is probably a large percentage of the population who would say, "Ugh, what a bunch of fantasy-crap, etc."

And that's no knock on said percentage of the population.  It's definitely a cup-of-tea thing, just like LOTR was.  I loved the LOTR movies, but I can definitely understand if someone who did not like those movies were to cite the overabundance of lines like "We shall journey through the Forest of Hibbledy-Jibbledy, and from there, we shall pass through the Mountains of..." as his or her reason.

In any event, I say give "PL" more than 20 minutes.  I've only seen it once, so I can't swear to this, but I'm guessing that there's plenty to be gotten out of the rest of the movie, even for those (and I'm sure there are many) who found the little flying pixie-thing that the girl is chasing around in the first act to be an "ugh"-inducer.
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madupont
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« Reply #2033 on: October 02, 2007, 01:20:55 PM »

jbottle,re:#2053 or re:club--this is my take on it direct from experience.

jbottle
"I was hoping you would come around and help us do a decent discussion with one..."

This is not a first, it is a persistent continual expectation that somebody should do the work which will  showcase  "the Star".

Which is why this kind of remark comes next: "I thought, dzimas, you had agreed to do
this film with Hoffman and me."   Even when there is a definite non-agreement; as I once experienced when I had other committments, and  was hounded by scene-throwing in any available forum(also from then on was never allowed to participate in a book discussion).  Because I had supplied the material for Il Leopardo, the extraneous participant became downright embarrassing.  Therefore I turned down the request that I provide for The Third Man.  All hell broke loose as a matter of fact.  But indeed The Third Man bores me. There seems to be this working through whatever fad comes to the attention of this fan until over the particular obsession imposed on everyone else. He'll sig his toadies on you, and recently has further developed a ladies-auxiliary.  For them, I suppose it is like Ladies Night at the Movies, or matinee book club or whatever, for which they get a nice piece of Depression glass if they buy a ticket to ride.

ps: I am aware you were frequenting the movie forum with a number of others here, before this person ever arrived, whereas I was most often in the Books and a couple of other places -- one of which also got invaded by
"scene-stealing". But, encountered  a lot of mere supposition being offered about one of Capote's novels, prior to either of the two films opening. Just my luck. You get sized up and then eliminated from competition with "the Star".


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barton
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« Reply #2034 on: October 02, 2007, 04:33:10 PM »

"but I can definitely understand if someone who did not like those movies were to cite the overabundance of lines like "We shall journey through the Forest of Hibbledy-Jibbledy, and from there, we shall pass through the Mountains of..." as his or her reason."

There are even those who, like me, have never seen the LOTR films simply based on the knowledge that such lines are lying in wait for them.

I don't see Pan's L as really in the fantasy genre, which I tend to avoid.  It's more "magical realism" maybe, and seems grounded in the world in a way fantasy, by its very defining traits, can't be.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2035 on: October 02, 2007, 05:51:29 PM »

I saw "Children of Men" the other night and thought it was pretty good, and a step in the right direction for what's his name, who is sympathetic here.  I couldn't tell you what happened, but I know it was well-made.  I'm pulling an oilcan here and not understanding plot, and I got a phone call and missed the ending.

If anyone wants to tell me the ending and post a SPOILER ALERT I would be thankful, I thought the battle scenes toward the end were well done, but I forget what happened or what the nature of the distopia was.

On that note, Mike Judge's "Idiocracy" was funny for the hour or so I watched it, want to see it in it's entirety sometime soon.  The studio obviously decided that like "Office Space," the movie was too specific in comic tone to garner a wide audience in opening weekend, vs., I guess, "R.V," which can be seen as inherently funny because you have to spray shit out of your RV from time to time, or the one where Eddie Murphy plays that dork guy.  "Idiocracy" is destined, like "Office Space," or "O.C. & Stiggs," to be a "cult classic because of little studio backbone to push marketing chips to go "all in," and decide instead to not throw good money after bad, even if the "bad" wasn't reall "bad" at all.  Same way "Sunshine," which was supposed to be an intelligent and engaging space thriller, but I'm sure the suits were like "I'm the one who tried to shove 'Solaris' down their throats, and we had a star...I don't DO SUN anymore..."
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2036 on: October 02, 2007, 07:07:27 PM »

If anyone wants to tell me the ending and post a SPOILER ALERT I would be thankful...

SPOILER ALERT!

the baby is saved.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2037 on: October 02, 2007, 08:38:02 PM »

Oh, yeah, but I thought maybe Owen would wake up under a coffee table or something and be like "oh, okay then..." like it was ALL A DREAM.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2038 on: October 02, 2007, 09:18:03 PM »

I heard it was Gilliamesque.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2039 on: October 02, 2007, 09:31:04 PM »

Oh, yeah, but I thought maybe Owen would wake up under a coffee table or something and be like "oh, okay then..." like it was ALL A DREAM.

SPOILER ALERT!

No, he dies, but he does save the baby.

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