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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33858 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #2100 on: October 05, 2007, 04:10:03 PM »

harrie,

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?storyID=9003&p=2

Young Newman
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harrie
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« Reply #2101 on: October 05, 2007, 04:30:44 PM »

He looks like he's channeling Brando. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2102 on: October 05, 2007, 08:04:05 PM »

Speaking of JJL, the following movie comes to mind in light of the the Onion's movies that are difficult to watch a second time, and it's funny that one of them notes not long after I did here that "Taxi Driver" plays like laughs after the grimness (not to mention the comparison of amateurishness/exploitative vs. masterful/thoughtful) of "Last House on the Left," for anybody that remembers.  JJL is great in the following that I had nearly forgotten, followed by a link that references a lesser though certainly more Tony Scott version of Hubert Selby's misery and poetry, by Darren Aranofsky.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097714/

http://www.avclub.com/content/feature/not_again_24_great_films_too

Note:  I might add "Henry:  Portrait of a Serial Killer" to the list, but I haven't seen it again, and so I don't know if it holds up as something that you shouldn't let grab you again.  I know "Bad Lieutenant" does because I've seen it so many times, and it's relentless...but then "Taxi Driver" was the same way for me in multiple viewings during high school and on, but then when it's placed in the larger context of, I guess formality and fairy tale, it's almost plays as a strange sort of inspirational speech to the demoralized, I don't know, I just know that "Taxi Driver" is a great movie/movie and I'm glad the Onion staff had the sense not to put it on the list.

There are some more apparently provocative and transgressive films that are on the list that I'm not sure you don't want to see a second time because you sort of disagree with the method if not the message.  Any films that deal with violence seriously should make you address where they fall on the edge between exploitation, provocative art, legitimate artistic statement, story that needed to be told, and every other way in which story or misery or violence or violation intercede and intersect, anyway, I've got a few to Netflix now, but I'm not sure that a list that includes "Million Dollar Baby" and "Bad Lieutenant" and "Last House on the Left" shouldn't also include something like "Ordinary People," where Tim Hutton grabs at least me every time, as does Sutherland, and possibly most of all Moore, who nails a sort of inescable retreat from humanity because of grief that's at least as complex if not as empathetic as the other two.  It's hard to watch as melodrama, because it's a great melodrama.  Not where you want to take a shower afterward, but still, I have trouble with the paramaters of lists, and of course the irony of a list of films that are hard to watch a second time has many people scrambling to do just that or watch a film they can expect to be difficult for the first time. 

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jbottle
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« Reply #2103 on: October 05, 2007, 08:11:30 PM »

I mixed up the link references which is easy to figure out and I never compared LHOTL to TD here, just said that TD is kinda funny to me now rather than difficult to watch.  Anyway, I'm not saying that Rabes or Tobes, or Phippsy are reading, but a coincidence is a coincidence, as was the inclusion of a critical re-eval of FGF and OC&S, but anyway, great job over there, good leads to films I look forward to seeing.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2104 on: October 05, 2007, 11:37:55 PM »



The Invisible Boy (1957)

—for Allen Ginsberg

He’s the Invisible Boy—
Just an Edgar Allan Poe
Spook down in the Crypt…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
Just a Teenage Werewolf
Hollywood LA kid…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
Much more invisible than
Claude Rains ever was…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
Like Olga Baclanova in drag
Freakshow Chicken Queen…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
Surrounded by Broken Mirrors
Distorted by twisting glass…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
His Invisibility depends on
People’s blind inner Eye…

He’s the Invisible Boy—
A minor phantasmagorical
Zit on the Zeitgeist…
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jbottle
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« Reply #2105 on: October 06, 2007, 01:06:47 AM »

Your poetry, is lame, sorry.

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2106 on: October 06, 2007, 01:15:33 AM »

That's okay, jbottle.

I kind of like it over here...

A nice break from the Movie Club...

Man does not live by del Toro alone, right?

With your kind permission of course...
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jbottle
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« Reply #2107 on: October 06, 2007, 01:16:51 AM »

What's you're favourite movie?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2108 on: October 06, 2007, 01:28:14 AM »

Right now at this very moment it's

Alejandro Amenábar's The Others...

A very sophisticated ghost story...

I like Amenábar and del Toro...

The way they work with Time...


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jbottle
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« Reply #2109 on: October 06, 2007, 01:29:17 AM »

Torn between "Miller's Crossing," and "Taxi Driver," oh and "Goodfellas," but, see, that be me.
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rmdig
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« Reply #2110 on: October 06, 2007, 09:06:12 AM »

As a currently unemployed American worker completely unaffected by the rosy jobs reports that made those folks on Wall Street so giddy yesterday (sorry for that long subordinate clause), I've been watching quite a few films these days.  A couple of them may even make my all time favorites list. 

One is a French film based on a novel by Simenon -- English title Red Lights.  It's about this alcoholic and his wife who head out to the country for the weekend and run into some bad trouble. 

Another film I really like is by Almodovar -- English title Live Flesh.  Blood, lust and revenge and it all hangs together beautifully.  Even if you don't consider yourself an Almodovar fan, this is a keeper.   

Finally, I watched Bergman's early film, Virgin Spring, for the first time and was stunned.  Don't know why it took me so long to get around to this film.

I also recently watched Babel for the first time, and while it won't make my all time favorites list, parts of it were quite good.  The part about the young girl whose mother has apparently committed suicide was eerie.  Also liked the ending which I take it some viewers didn't get.
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madupont
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« Reply #2111 on: October 06, 2007, 10:05:16 AM »

I can understand being "stunned" by The Virgin Spring. This is where Bergman handles a delicate subject, compared to his more scintillating investigation of neuroses and psychoses both modern and medieval. It is the moment when he decides to do the personal violence of the Middle Ages; and, I don't think that we are prepared for it, by the set-up we are given of a view into domestic life  of a Scandinavian tribal chieftain.

We get in touch with the reality of our forebears as more than quietly dull chapters in a history book.
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madupont
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« Reply #2112 on: October 06, 2007, 10:39:38 AM »


He looks like he's channeling Brando. 


Yes, I had the fleeting impression that he may have been observing Brando in a class-exercise but I really don't know whether they went to the same acting school. Anyone have a guess?

Okay, so I checked. Yes, they did both attend Actors' Studio, the west side address rings a bell to me, and the fact that Elia Kazan was in on the founding and that it was to use Constantin Stanislavski's method. I knew he had studied with Stella Adler; but he also attended the American Theater Wing, when he arrived in New York toward the end of the 1940s, as well as the New School, which lends some credence of my end remarks/quotes on why he went out to Provincetown.


The expression on Newman's face may be nothing but the fact that by the time that shot was taken, he would have seen Brando do all of these parts: Academy Awards
Nominated: Best Actor, A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
Nominated: Best Actor, Viva Zapata! (1952)
Nominated: Best Actor, Julius Caesar (1953)
Won: Best Actor, On the Waterfront (1954)

Here is a later, little known fact and seldom seen movie.
Nominated: Best Actor, The Nightcomers (1973)  A prequel to Henry James. Guess which one.

There's not necessarily a huge [edit] on this one but [edit] still standing because we have to take Darwin Porter's word for it in Brando Unzipped, published following the death of Brando who is not around to refute these somehow believable yet unproven stories; the earlier biographical remarks are accepted as fact on the basis that author says they are "quotes" from Brando: 
"Brando had always been open with friends about his bisexuality. In his 1976 biography The Only Contender by Gary Carey, Brando was quoted as saying, "Like a large number of men, I, too, have had homosexual experiences, and I am not ashamed." An alleged long time lover was Wally Cox. Brando is quoted as saying: "If Wally had been a woman, I would have married him and we would have lived happily ever after."[7] After Cox died, Brando kept his ashes for 30 years; they were eventually scattered with his own. Cox's third wife only discovered he possessed them after reading an interview in Time where Brando is quoted as saying: "I have Wally's ashes in my house. I talk to him all the time." She wanted to sue, but her lawyers would not accept the case.[8] Darwin Porter's biography Brando Unzipped (2006) details alleged affairs with Cary Grant, Rock Hudson and Stewart Granger[9].

During the filming of Streetcar Named Desire (1951), in the garden of Vivien Leigh's mansion, David Niven discovered Brando and Laurence Olivier swimming in the pool. Olivier was kissing Brando. "I turned my back to them and went back inside to join Vivien. I'm sure she knew what was going on, but she made no mention of it. Nor did I. One must be sophisticated about such matters in life."[10] "

Despite possibility,probability, his delicious sense of humor,and the money to be made by others,he had eight children and adopted three more.

Have not been able to locate the Latimes story attributed to Robert W. Welkos for footnote[7]. Which is a delightful twist to entertain at least a moment or two in reverie for those who remember the special way Wally had when he talked of Marlon Brando with whom he had been a room-mate in the Village when they began their acting careers.

However, we ought to consider this rather important part of the story before closing our minds and deciding one way or another. "He achieved real stardom, however, as Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire in 1947, directed by Elia Kazan. Brando sought out that role, driving out to Provincetown, Massachusetts, where Williams was spending the summer, to audition for the part. Williams recalled that he opened the screen door and knew, instantly, that he had his Stanley Kowalski." (no accreditation on this at wikipedia)
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barton
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« Reply #2113 on: October 06, 2007, 10:48:53 AM »

RM -- I liked Babel for the complex "everyone is connected" theme, with a rifle as the key connecting element, and a single bullet, fired on a thoughtless impulse,  setting it all in motion.  The Japanese girl was very haunting, for sure.  I thought there was restraint shown in keeping the film from becoming polemical about guns or  how our borders are controlled, and just staying focused on individual lives and the intrusion of randomness.  Though I didn't find it the best film of 2006, I'm surprised at how much it stayed with me.  I like it better than Innaritu's other triple-plot juggling act (at least I think it was Innaritu), Amores Perros, though that was a good film, too.



 
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barton
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« Reply #2114 on: October 06, 2007, 10:52:12 AM »

I neglected to mention Innaritu also directed 21 Grams.

So, he' s done three in this multiple thread style.



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