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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 41126 times)
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rmdig
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« Reply #2145 on: October 10, 2007, 06:57:08 PM »

dzimas

I watched La Dolce Vita about two weeks ago.  Every time I see Anita Ekberg I think of Bob Dylan's lyrics in I Shall Be Free.


Well, my telephone rang it would not stop
It's President Kennedy callin' me up
He said, "My friend, Bob, what do we need to make the country grow" ?
I said, "My friend, John, "Brigitte Bardot,
Anita Ekberg
Sophia Loren"
Country'll grow.

Have you seen A Tout de Suite?  French film that came out a few years ago.  Not bad.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2146 on: October 10, 2007, 08:19:36 PM »

#3 in top five scenes...

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ukONzCkxLkk
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2147 on: October 11, 2007, 04:14:40 AM »

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Dzimas
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« Reply #2148 on: October 11, 2007, 04:24:56 AM »

Cat figured heavily into Breakfast at Tiffany's,



at least as far as cats go in movies.  I thought Blake Edwards played the move closer to La Dolce Vita than he did the book.  It seemed like the American version of the sweet life. 

It was interesting to read at IMDb that Dino De Laurentiis pulled out when Fellini refused to cast Paul Newman as Marcello.  I guess, Federico would have had to call his main character Paolo.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2007, 07:22:19 AM by Dzimas » Logged
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« Reply #2149 on: October 12, 2007, 12:06:13 PM »

Famous film cats --

"Cat" (BaT)

Jake (The Cat from Outer Space)

DC (That Darn Cat!)

Jones (Alien)

"Cutter's Way" in the mailbox today, will report back.

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« Reply #2150 on: October 12, 2007, 05:02:41 PM »

Dzimas and Barton, (not a good Law Firm but maybe a new film rental that changes everything).

I was thoroughly confused by Dzimas referral to Blake Edwards and Paul Newman, until I read Barton's post.  I did some research on this way back when about the time that the second film of the (duel?) Dual of the Capote Actors took place, just to compare films, and learned this about Cat.

"Hepburn said the scene where she throws Cat into the rainy street was the most distasteful thing she ever had to do on film."

Thus, if Paul Newman had been cast as Paolo instead of "George" Peppard, would they have retitled this, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof? As I recall Audrey is too tall for Paul. But Steve McQueen would have been just about right and changed the tenor of this film. This would have been much better than having an earnings competition with Elizabeth Taylor; which they were not but you know how much is made of these things. I loved the Givenchy clothes and of her rather stange beau,Jose Vilallonga, although the most exasperating, was also the most interesting.

Here is another of those things that I always knew:

"Truman Capote maintained that he based Holly Golightly on Carol Grace (the former wife of William Saroyan and future wife of Walter Matthau), who had been a friend of his while living in New York."  Had been, until he was a has been. Not because of Carol but you do not cross people like Gloria Vanderbilt. Or, a daughter of neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing, such as Babe Paley.  In truth Holly as played by Audrey, although not looking like Carol Grace Saroyan Matthau one bit, is about as close as you can get to Carol's persona or spirit, which remained girlish ingenue.

You find this born out in Capote's  re-released new edition of,Answered Prayers, where Grace joins one of the other girls at La Cote Basque for lunch; and being in their Thirties, they discuss previous husbands and the third of the former school-mates who is not there when they have this discussion.

Everybody of course always says that Truman really wrote Holly Golightly to play the role of himself in an interesting triangle, which is probably how rumors get started that it had to be a gorgeous blonde like MM or Kim Novack because Truman was a gorgeous blond,... at the time.
And that further rumors develop that Paula Strasberg's father, Lee who had been acting coach for the nonce to Marilyn discouraged her from playing "a prostitute".  What gives? Holly was a flim-flam artist who took $50 tips to go to the ladies room and skip out when she didn't like a guy;
plus $100 for each message delivered from the Mafia guy,Tomatoes, whenever she visited him in prison and he would tell her what to say to his "associate" back in Manhattan.  This does not put her under the designation "call girl", which was the glowing term that came up when Elizabeth Taylor did, 
John O' Hara's, Butterfield 8.(released the previous year).  No, Audrey as Holly lived by her wits because she was actually a Southern Girl in every way that Truman had written her, something like his mother perhaps?

Where the triangle came in was entirely a little something he tried to experiment with at first by making Holly have an affair with another girl but then they knew that would not sell; it was however a cover for the bust up of his own relationship with his own room-mate over in Brooklyn, a man's man, actor/dancer who had been part of a well-known husband and wife dance-team. I will not say "until Truman came along", from his little Southern community where that nice Gregory Peck type lawyer and his daughter Harper lived in To-Kill-a-Mockingbirdville. But the relationship began a decade before Breakfast at Tiffany's was published, shortly after, Other Voices,Other Rooms; "significant relationship of his life. When Capote met a fellow writer,... a handsome man ten years his senior, he was awestruck by him and the two began a relationship that would last, in one form or another, for the next 35 years." (from Fyne magazine,UK)

This also would not play well on screen, thus the invention of Eunice Eustace in 2-E, played by Patricia Neal, one of my favourite actresses in the Golden Age of Television, who became the older woman who keeps George Peppard.

« Last Edit: October 12, 2007, 05:14:13 PM by madupont » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #2151 on: October 13, 2007, 02:52:22 AM »

No, maddie, Newman was supposedly de Laurentiis' choice for La Dolce Vita.  I just said that BaT reminded me more of LDV than it did Capote's book.  I don't remember much of a triangle in the book.  It seemed that Paul was more or less someone Holly confided in.  There wasn't the same love interest that there was in the movie, and Capote was more brazen in describing Holly's activities.  The book was told in retrospect with Paul and the photographer meeting up at a bar after a long while, and the photographer saying he had spotted Holly in Africa, and so the two take a trip down memory lane.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2007, 03:23:18 AM by Dzimas » Logged
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« Reply #2152 on: October 13, 2007, 03:25:41 AM »

Famous film cats --

"Cat" (BaT)

Jake (The Cat from Outer Space)

DC (That Darn Cat!)

Jones (Alien)

"Cutter's Way" in the mailbox today, will report back.



You can add Blofeld's white cat in Diamonds are Forever.
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« Reply #2153 on: October 13, 2007, 12:31:39 PM »

Cutter's Way, while I can't call it a great movie, is a fairly compelling Proto-Lebowski -- one can see the first glimmerings of "The Dude" in Jeff Bridges character, the drolly named "Richard Bone" (he's a bit of a ladies man) and an early Walter Sobchak (John Goodman's raving Vietnam vet in TBL) in Cutter, played in a darker and drunker mode by John Heard, a vet who is missing one eye, one arm, and one leg and lurches around Santa Barbara, by turns obnoxious and pathetic.  After Bone witnesses the aftermath of a murder -- the town's mighty oil baron "J.J. Cord" dumping a corpse in a trash can, Cutter hatches a plan to blackmail Cord, and then turn him over to the police.  Things go awry, but in a mainly grimmer mode than TBL.  Both Bridges and Heard lift the film a notch or two out of the B movie bin.

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« Reply #2154 on: October 13, 2007, 02:14:38 PM »



What a big ole l-a-z-y  fat cat...

Oh man, does he have the right laid-back attitude...

If I could only just relax that way...

Without getting a hangover...
  Smiley

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madupont
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« Reply #2155 on: October 13, 2007, 05:11:21 PM »


No, maddie, Newman was supposedly de Laurentiis' choice for La Dolce Vita.  I just said that BaT reminded me more of LDV than it did Capote's book.  I don't remember much of a triangle in the book.  It seemed that Paul was more or less someone Holly confided in.  There wasn't the same love interest that there was in the movie, and Capote was more brazen in describing Holly's activities.  The book was told in retrospect with Paul and the photographer meeting up at a bar after a long while, and the photographer saying he had spotted Holly in Africa, and so the two take a trip down memory lane.


Got that about "de Laurentis' choice".  I thought it remarkably humorous, picturing how it came about. Paul Newman is known to have said to his visiting buddy Robert Redford in an Iconoclast sequence, how much he hated his appearance in his role for The Silver Chalice filmed about six years prior to La Dolce Vita.  I gather the shooting location was here in the US and it was his first film but picture this: Alexander Scourby as St.Luke(Scourby was a much cast television actor),Lorne Greene as St. Peter, Jack Palance as Simon (the flying) Magician. And the only actor in the cast who would have had my approval was Joseph Wiseman whose every role I watched in the Golden Era of tv.

"I don't remember much of a triangle in the book.  It seemed that Paul(George Peppard was more or less someone Holly confided in."  Yes, in so far as Paul was actually Jack Dunphy with whom Capote lived after his successful earlier book ten years prior to BaT; and Capote was Holly Golightly. Thus:

"There wasn't the same love interest that there was in the movie, and Capote was more brazen in describing Holly's activities."  Yes, of course he was more brazen in describing his own activities as Holly's who was his stand in. The publishers at the time were not interested in publishing a homosexual book nor were film makers interested in buy such a book to film.   His friends and acquaintances knew the crib notes to this fiction. You simply have to remember to stop picturing Audrey Hepburn being cute and instead start remembering and visualizing how cute Truman thought he was whether you prefer the recent Philip Seymour Hoffman delivery of the roll, or took a discerning comparative look at Infamous, for the rival performance which was quite as good from an entirely different emphasis (especially because it indicates graphically at what point Capote began to be incapable of further literary writing and what was the emotional cause that incapcitated him which I see as quite valid. There are hidden dangers in the art of writing to which many writers have succumbed. They write for very emotional reasons of their own, and there are times when their emotional involvement can trip them out.)

However, viewing Infamous requires keeping your eye on the little rascal Capote at all times (with one or two exceptions)because it is basically a boring movie about his hanging out with the girls who can do the most for him. One exception is the excellent scene played early in the film by Gwyneth Paltrow as a lounge-singer of the day, it is a cameo performance but it is the thematic warning of what will be the eventual outcome of this movie. Secondly you have Daniel Craig who was brought into this film by Paltrow because they had worked together on, Sylvia. He plays what happens to Truman. It's all a matter of preference whether you dig his performance or not. I usually like his work no matter how far out, because his type lives in all those various roles. He's a reality you have to deal with as Capote finds out.

That is the back story of what Breakfast at Tiffany only presages. Who would have guessed?  Capote was a pretty flippant guy; and Manhattan's new television social uppercrust adored characters who were interesting people or vice-versa, until the fatal moment when he and his editor made a big mistake.

Therefore as I said previously, there was no lady who was keeping George Peppard, it was the original person on whom the character Peppard played-- who was keeping Capote although it was  by then probably very mutual in all senses including the income derived from writing, as by that time Capote possibly had more regular income than Dunphy. It's otherwise a wacky movie which they keep adjusting to make it work. When I saw it again on tv six months ago, I couldn't believe it but it was true in action to the era and in fact donotremove notified me of an article runnining in the nytimes(archived) about the journals of Leo Lerman who was written into Answered Prayers by Capote as a character named Hilary.  Audrey was the only saving grace of that movie. Poor Patricia Neal who had been an excellent excellent actress during her day when film-noir was still in vogue.
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« Reply #2156 on: October 13, 2007, 05:26:10 PM »

Ps, forgive the misprints. When I reread the print out and spotted at minimum three, perhaps more incorrect spellings either slips of the mind of slips on the keyboard, I didn't want to risk modification!
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« Reply #2157 on: October 14, 2007, 12:41:37 AM »

barton, I felt almost the same about Cutter's Way -- but I must admit, it's grown on me with repeated viewings.  It was in rotation on one of my movie package channels for a while, so I caught it a couple times.  Gotta admit -- at times, I thought John Heard should just get a jaunty hat and a parrot on his shoulder to complete whole pirate characterization.  But somewhere along the line, I realized that his character was pissing me off so much that he (John Heard, the actor) was probably doing something right (in portraying his flawed character, Cutter).
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2158 on: October 14, 2007, 01:32:47 AM »

Maddie, you can imagine all you want, just don't start reflecting your imaginations off me.  Whether or not Truman saw himself as Holly, is anyone's guess.  I didn't get that impression in reading the book, but of course he loved to play the field.  If he imagined himself as Holly, he did about as complete a 180 as you can imagine in the way he described her, because he pictured her as a big blowsy girl, a regular Vamp of Savannah.  He did see Marilyn Monroe in the role.  But, then maybe he had long fantasized himself as MM.  I got the feeling he mostly wrote the book for fun.  Of course, he avoided coming straight out and saying Paul was gay, given the attitudes at the time, but he made it pretty clear where Paul's affinities lay.  Paul had no carnal interest in Holly, more of a protector's role, which more or less was reflected in the movie, except Blake simply couldn't resist pairing them up in the end.

Anyway, I still liked the movie.  Blake Edwards made the story his own, and did a pretty good job of it.
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« Reply #2159 on: October 14, 2007, 01:10:01 PM »

Harrie, I'm not sure I would plan to see Cutter's Way again, but Heard's character is uniquely obnoxious and I feel, as you say, that he pretty much nailed it in the angry drunken cripple category.  I sort of liked the way he dried up when Maureen was murdered -- he says he drinks to get through the ordinary days, but takes his tragedies straight.  I'm not sure I've seen Heard in any role at all similar to this one.

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