Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 52779 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #2160 on: October 14, 2007, 03:03:12 PM »

Dzimas,re: #2181  "just don't start reflecting your imaginations off me."   Who says it is imaginations?; you do. Other than that our comments on the picture as derived from the book are hardly differing.  It was a very long time ago at The New York Times on-line Book forums such as they were in those day that I suggested a book we could read for a book discussion of the month*, based on the household that lived in Brooklyn when Capote was there, by a woman who  had been a part of that household. I think it might be quite as interesting as in future the remarks of those who lived at or came and went from the days Norman Mailer first started living in Brooklyn up until now. Many did because of the high cost of comparative rents in the Greenwich Village of their "imagination".

I was there at the time that the book was published by Random House. That probably had a great deal to do with the fact that my Aunt Lee had lived in an apartment west of Central Park (while her husband ran the Chevrolet division at General Motors) because she detested Flint,Michigan and preferred to remain with a view of the Chrysler Bldg ;  when I told her that I wanted to study at Martha Graham's which was opposite on the East side of the Park, she was all for it and so I went.

That was partially inspired by the dancers who were cast at various times in the adaption that Capote did of his novel (Grass Harp?) into the House of Flowers by Richard Arlen in which Geoffrey Holder appeared (who later married Carmen de Lavallade); there was a later off-Broadway revival of this at Theatre de Lys when Capote had another book published but the revival was unsuccessful. He had previously been given credit for having "co-written" --Beat the Devil- for John Huston's film. Then another production of H.o F. (may have been filmed) more recently with Maurice Hines, the dancer who had previously done The Cotton Club for Coppola and had been more or less introduced to the public as the brother of Gregory Hines who had co-starred in White Nights with Baryshnikov.

So I am not unfamiliar with Capote's "ambience", but to me he is just another one of those Southern writers whom I began reading by about age twenty, like Flannery O'Connor,Eudora Welty, and he is nowhere as good as Carson McCullers.

So if you imply that my own thoughts on the subject of what became a movie are merely "derivative" , too bad, that's very dismissive as this forum was originally open to the ideas and opinions of people reviewing movies.


*( but as you know the editor was concerned about selling current books)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2161 on: October 14, 2007, 04:00:26 PM »


"I realized that his character was pissing me off..."


Oh, dear me...
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2162 on: October 14, 2007, 04:05:00 PM »


"...because his type lives in all those various roles.
He's a reality you have to deal with as Capote finds out."


Oh, dear me...

I wonder what Truman found out?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2163 on: October 14, 2007, 04:07:52 PM »


"You simply have to remember to stop picturing Audrey Hepburn being cute
and instead start remembering and visualizing how cute Truman thought he was..."


 Huh Huh Huh Huh Huh Huh
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harrie
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« Reply #2164 on: October 15, 2007, 11:21:55 AM »

barton, I get the part about not watching Cutter's Way more than once, but the first time around I was working on something at the same time; and when Bridges performed the ending act of the flick, I was kind of "wha the...huh?"  That is, I thought he was undermotivated to actually do what he did.  Which is why I made a point of catching the film again, at which point I begain to appreciate some things I had previously missed and started really liking the movie.   

For me, the biggest drawback overall was Heard's at-times OTT performance -- I hate scenery chewers. Though the general consensus, I guess, is that Cutter's Way is Heard's movie and Bridges is window dressing.  I thought Lisa Eichhorn was great, and I wondered why she isn't working these days. Then I looked her up, and she is working, just not in stuff I've seen. So there.
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #2165 on: October 15, 2007, 12:04:27 PM »

I liked the ending of CW -- (SPOILERS)








-- when the oil baron puts on his shades, it occurred to me that any actor (listening, David Caruso?) who punctuates their dramatic moment with sunglasses should be shot.   

(END SPOILERS)

So that was pretty satisfying.


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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
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« Reply #2166 on: October 15, 2007, 01:07:40 PM »

I watched a made-for-television (?) film by Jean Renoir -- The Horrible Case of Dr. Cordelier.  Dates from 1959 and stars Jean-Louis Barrault in the title role.  If you are not familiar with this film, and I sure wasn't, it covers much of the same ground covered in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, except it's Dr. Cordelier and Mr. Opale.  Jean-Louis Barrault fills his cheeks with gauze in order to disfigure his face when he is the evil Mr. Opale.  (I thought Brando was the first to do that.)  Anyway, a pretty good low-budget good film -- $76,000 to make -- from a master filmmaker who also has a small role in the film.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2167 on: October 15, 2007, 05:24:27 PM »

I thought Lisa Eichhorn was great...

Me too - her first scene with Jeff Bridges, where she reaches out and he thinks she's reaching out to hold his hand, and she says, "No, hand me the bottle..."  I was just like wow, this lady is great.  She looks a little bit like Bridget Fonda, which makes it even more confounding that I've never seen her before.
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #2168 on: October 15, 2007, 06:15:06 PM »

That's Imus's ex, right?
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harrie
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« Reply #2169 on: October 15, 2007, 07:14:07 PM »

That's Imus's ex, right?

News to me.  He's not on her IMDB bio, not that they're infallible or anything.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2170 on: October 15, 2007, 07:57:41 PM »

I wrote a long post about "Cutter's" describing why I think it's worth a second look and above-average, but it somehow got deleted in one swell keystroke or in my beer-soaked imagination, the same cruel troll that knocked the site before.  Is anyone familiar with a keystroke that knocks off your words without highlighting them first and accidentatally hitting delete.  And unlike word or whatever, I couldn't undelete, so I was fairly disappointed.

Anyway, I thought that "Cutter" was a kind of one of the buddy-cop movies, if one is a way over the top embittered alcoholic with a peg leg and patch and nasty disposition and one is a good-looking slacker with the exasperation that Bridges would have in "Cutter" only hinting at a more shallow, more deeply troubled exasperation in TBL.  It hit all the right noir notes without taking itself too seriously, and Heard just makes the damn thing.  I also had compared the formal deconstruction of the genre that "Body Heat" hints at, kind of the way "Body Heat" is also boring to a third or fourth look while something like "Cutter" is perplexing because you don't know where the ham vs. eggonface begins or ends..."Body Heat" is a better movie, I guess, but on a desert island give me "Cutter" and a few cases of scotch anyday.  "Cutter" is on the same WTF level at times as "Mike's Murder," "O.C. & Stiggs," "H.E.A.L.T.H," "The Party Animal," and others where if have a strong WTF bone, it will invariably get tickled, and at the same time you can't really argue for or against somebody panning it or giving it glowering praise, either way, you're like, yeah, no, you're exactly right.   
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harrie
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« Reply #2171 on: October 15, 2007, 09:51:24 PM »

Hey, jbottle!  That mystery deletion stuff happens to me, too -- usually if I'm finishing with a flourish and in the dramatic sweep of the hand, I hit the exactly wrong key.  Or I just hit the wrong key while pounding away -- before you know it, I've hit an ALT or a CTRL and then some key that is lethal in combination.  Maybe that's why all my posts that make it are so boring; the good ones get deleted.

In any case, it's nice to see you, and I appreciate getting your take on Cutter's Way.  I am now determined to locate and view OC and Stiggs and I guess Mike's Murder, though I did see it long, long ago. But I can't remember a damn thing except Joe Jackson had something to do with it -- the singer, not the shoeless guy.

I like Body Heat well enough, but I know what you mean by losing something, versus gaining something,  over repeated viewings of certain movies.  At my house, we kind of razz it because Kim Zimmer is on my soap and she plays the Turner look-alike, so we make rude cracks and whatnot.  But overall, I find it's more the kind of flick where you watch and wait for something you know is coming, versus discovering something you missed other times.  Which there's nothing wrong with, there's a whole set of movies with which I do exactly that.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2172 on: October 16, 2007, 03:08:36 AM »


I was there at the time that the book was published by Random House ...


I love your stories, maddie, but first you think I was referring to Newman being cast as Paul in BaT, and then you pointedly tell me to think past Audrey Hepburn, mentioning some love triangle that never existed as I remember from the book, and how Tru loved to think of himself as a big blowsy she-vamp, and that he was projecting himself in Holly, etc.  I just think you should more closely read another person's posts before sounding off.  Thanks.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2173 on: October 16, 2007, 03:35:59 AM »

Someone mentioned Big Night.  Maybe it was you, maddie?  Great food movie.  Right up there with Babette's Feast, Tampopo and Eat, Drink, Man, Woman.  Big Night is closer to home and had some first rate acting by Tucci, Shalhoub, Rossellini, Driver, not to mention Ian Holm as Pascal.  It did have a theatrical quality to it.  I suppose they could have just as easily called it "Waiting on Louis Prima,"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PifyOs1tjy4

but that would be missing the fun of this movie, which gave us a wonderful taste of real Italian cooking and just how hard it is to make it in this highly competitive world.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2174 on: October 16, 2007, 09:17:36 AM »

How is "Children Of Men" not Gilliamesque?  It's "12 Monkeys" meets "Brazil". And I don't say that as a knock - I like Terry Gilliam's movies, and I liked "COM"...

- Dystopian futuristic society, world ravaged by some unexplained disease, terrorist/rebels, oppressive government, etc.

- Hero works as a drone in a government office

- Love interest has ties to anti-government terrorist/rebel movement (Kim Griest / J.Moore)

- Hero asks higher-up official buddy for a favor, in an effort to help the girl (Michael Palin / Danny Huston)

- He gets help from some weird outcast-type guy (DeNiro / Caine)
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