Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 34182 times)
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harrie
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« Reply #2175 on: October 16, 2007, 09:44:10 AM »

I thought Lisa Eichhorn was great...

Me too - her first scene with Jeff Bridges, where she reaches out and he thinks she's reaching out to hold his hand, and she says, "No, hand me the bottle..."  I was just like wow, this lady is great.  She looks a little bit like Bridget Fonda, which makes it even more confounding that I've never seen her before.

oilcan, I thought I said this yesterday, but apparently I didn't, so I apologize, but  - YES!  That is a great little scene that tells you so much that you need to know with a couple of jabs.   I love the next two lines too, which I will get wrong.  But Bridges says "I don't like you when you're high" and Eichhorn shoots back sardonically "Well that's funny, I can't stand you when I'm sober."   (Of course, it plays much better in the actual movie.)


kidcarter, Imus's girlfriend was Lisa Denton.  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0219848/bio
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2176 on: October 16, 2007, 09:52:56 AM »

That is a great little scene that tells you so much that you need to know with a couple of jabs.   

Word - there's a lot of that (a little bit that says a lot) in "Cutter's Way".  I'm only halfway or so through the movie - can't wait to see how it ends.
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madupont
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« Reply #2177 on: October 16, 2007, 10:06:17 AM »

Dzimas, no, I caught it that you were referring to Newman having been compared to Mastroianni; although we end up with the factor of di Laurentis dropping out of the project: Breakfast at Tiffanys, if he couldn't have Paul Newman signed on to play opposite Audrey Hepburn. I was following barton's post and more than suggested, in that case, could we have then called it Cat on a Hot Tin Roof?

Newman had by then demonstrated a capacity to project a strong screen presence, even grousing around as Brick Politt did not destroy the contained fire that he conveyed to the camera.  This would have entirely set the Breakfast at Tiffany atmosphere on it's head, by dampering the silliness factor. Just because Holly was as ditzy as a Marilyn Monroe for instance,in how the lines read, did not mean everybody had to get carried away, but that is the director's take what will come out. Newman has given more than ample evidence of how to humor the dynamics by playing opposite Joanne Woodward.

But the real funny stuff, is anyone back then theoretically presuming that Fellini would have just stood there and accepted someone else's casting of Newman into La Dolce Vita, a film which I often found much too hilarious for what it purported to be.  There must have been something in the water back then, left over residue from WW2?  Marcello Mastroianni wasn't exactly a shoe-in of perfection for his role. Although he began as an extra as far back as 1939, by the time that he made Big Deal on Madonna Street,(for USA release) with Vittorio Gassman and Claudia Cardinale, he was way down the list of personae in the casting and this was two years before La Dolce Vita.  It was an opportunity that paid off although he built an independent career.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2178 on: October 16, 2007, 10:18:52 AM »

Here are some of the nuggets IMDb offers,



Truman Capote maintained that he based Holly Golightly on Carol Grace (the former wife of William Saroyan and future wife of Walter Matthau), who had been a friend of his while living in New York. (So much for projecting himself into Holly, but then he could have just been saying that for fun)

John Frankenheimer was hired to shoot the film with Marilyn Monroe. When the producers suddenly moved to Switzerland and Audrey Hepburn replaced Monroe, she said she had never heard of Frankenheimer and insisted that he be paid off and another director be hired. (surprised Hepburn had this much pull)

At a post-production meeting following a screening of the film, a studio executive, in reference to "Moon River," said, "Well, I think the first thing we can do is get rid of that stupid song." Audrey Hepburn stood up at the table and said, "Over my dead body!" The song stayed in the picture. (ditto)

Kim Novak told Larry King that she was offered the part of Holly Golightly before Hepburn. (I could see Novak in the role)

Steve McQueen was offered the co-starring role. However, he was still under contract for the show "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958), which prevented him from appearing. The role eventually went to George Peppard (Didn't McQueen and Novak appear together in The Cincinnati Kid?)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054698/trivia
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madupont
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« Reply #2179 on: October 16, 2007, 10:19:44 AM »

Harrie, I'm glad jbottle is back here in the morning; and I too hit the Ctrl button at the end of the line but have no idea if there is another button in combination that screws it all up. This usually happens to me if I am typing with insufficient lighting and it is too dark for my black keyboard(having recently changed in the last year from a white). This happens late afternoon/very early evening when I didn't bother to get up and reach for the back lighting that my eye-doctor says is perfect for my "prescription". I'd rather read on line anyday than deal with books badly printed today for mass marketing.

As long as I place my hands on the keyboard in the original recommended position and don't reach too far to come back rapidly, it works out.
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barton
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« Reply #2180 on: October 16, 2007, 11:12:40 AM »

I, too, have been mystified by the mysterious "single strike" button, which I've bounced off of and somehow vanished a long post -- I am never able to figure out which key it is.  Sort of glad to know that I'm not the only one who manages this feat.  Alcohol is not a prerequisite for this, btw.

Eichorn was, more I reflect on it, amazing in C's Way.



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madupont
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« Reply #2181 on: October 16, 2007, 11:29:08 AM »


Here are some of the nuggets IMDb offers,


Truman Capote maintained that he based Holly Golightly on Carol Grace (the former wife of William Saroyan and future wife of Walter Matthau), who had been a friend of his while living in New York. (So much for projecting himself into Holly, but then he could have just been saying that for fun)

John Frankenheimer was hired to shoot the film with Marilyn Monroe. When the producers suddenly moved to Switzerland and Audrey Hepburn replaced Monroe, she said she had never heard of Frankenheimer and insisted that he be paid off and another director be hired. (surprised Hepburn had this much pull)

At a post-production meeting following a screening of the film, a studio executive, in reference to "Moon River," said, "Well, I think the first thing we can do is get rid of that stupid song." Audrey Hepburn stood up at the table and said, "Over my dead body!" The song stayed in the picture. (ditto)

Kim Novak told Larry King that she was offered the part of Holly Golightly before Hepburn. (I could see Novak in the role)

Steve McQueen was offered the co-starring role. However, he was still under contract for the show "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958), which prevented him from appearing. The role eventually went to George Peppard (Didn't McQueen and Novak appear together in The Cincinnati Kid?)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054698/trivia


"Truman Capote maintained that he based Holly Golightly on Carol Grace (the former wife of William Saroyan and future wife of Walter Matthau),"  

Notice that "maintained" is in the past tense.  Carol Grace was a character important to a scene he did in his last committment novel, originally labeled La Cote Basque, after the restaurant in which the scene is set. The novel was later titled,"Answered Prayers", and has been re-released because of the films,  about Capote, having revived an interest in that book (which is all for the good to the publishing houses).

In order to get his contract for --In Cold Blood, he signed the normal two-book contract but by the time it came to fulfilling the contract, he was both alcoholic and extremely addicted.  Thus, although he had notes to fall back on, impressions he kept of various people in his social life, which is exactly what got him into hot water, only some of the stories had been worked, while he had been much too busy coming to terms with managing the great experiment he was doing in writing -- In Cold Blood --  let's just put it this way, many other writers in that period had true stories to tell, Norman Mailer, Jim Jones, etc. come to mind. In order to keep up with that, it was Capote's insight that he could rework a news story, by investigating it like a journalist but by making use of his honed instincts for both picking up and giving coloring when writing fiction.  It made him the greatest thing since sliced bread.

I was reminded, in watching his award-reading scene, in the film,Capote, as played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, in fact taken right back that  there had been a day when a writer could expect the rewards of the fanfare today given to film-stars and "celebrities".  He would have a formal reading before an audience of his peers and the public.  It sounds a bit quaintly old-fashioned today ( like are we talking about the Roman Forum?) but it actually did exist as an honor which you could shoot for as a writer to cap your career.

Norman Mailer had a somewhat different way of approaching "celebrity",by what was thought of as a shocking writing style in matters of heterosexuality, in the days when Esquire still required and brought out literati; Mailer could also get by writing pieces for The Village Voice while carefully budgeting his royalties. Along with eventually running for mayor of New York.

But once Capote's day in the sun was over, he had to finish a novel of stories the girls told each other at La Cote Basque, and told him; but he was incapable of working (Infamous, the movie, claims to explain in detail what happened that made Capote an emotional wreck unable to continue the discipline of his work load.  But there is also the physical side). The book which we now know as, Answered Prayers, was almost in entirety written by his editor to cover the committment because Capote was no longer able to repay what he had received in "advances" and he needed the income; it is based on the vignettes and notes that Truman should never have jotted down as they became the cat let out of the bag.  He now immediately became persona non grata among the socialites who had given him the stories (including in some cases illustrious husbands). Other than his editor, there weren't going to be anymore forthcoming handouts.

"(surprised Hepburn had this much pull)", in your second paragraph, I'm not, because when you refer to Marilyn Monroe up to bargaining for Holly --she was already known as notoriously unreliable a basket-case; besides "movies" are put together based on who else is reputedly tentatively "under contract" when offering other requirements and roles through the agents of prospective talents.  This changes over the telephone (or the fax) every other day, and the committments are not in writing. People take better offers; it is very disappointing to those not yet veterans of the industry.(as you noted about Steve McQueen).  Audrey Hepburn was at the time intensely reliable and disciplined.

She had survived the German occupation of the Netherlands. Where she continued as a very disciplined dancer at the Hague. She had done a performance of Gigi, and then Ondine, on Broadway which is when she caught my attention. Mel Ferrer was also in that latter production and became her husband. Then, "Hollywood", so-called.

Then too, if you recall, Kim Novack was an actress out of Chicago who was groomed to be an imitation Marilyn Monroe although their personalities were in no way similar; therefore she was likely to say anything to Larry King as a form of publicity. Anything put into imdb as back-story, I know upfront must be read between the lines.


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desdemona222b
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« Reply #2182 on: October 16, 2007, 11:48:48 AM »

I don't want to disrupt the Cutter's Way discussion, but I saw Bug the other night and I'm anxious to talk about it. 
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harrie
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« Reply #2183 on: October 16, 2007, 12:12:56 PM »

Desdemona, I haven't seen Bug yet; but this being the non-clubbing section, you're pretty much free to say whatever you like, and people tend to jump in.   Was Bug a rental/TV or theater viewing?
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #2184 on: October 16, 2007, 12:22:44 PM »

We watched it on DVD.  It's the craziest movie I've seen in ages.  Ashley Judd and Harry Connick are in it - it's a recent horror flick based on a Broadway play.  "Horror" is the only descriptor that fits, but it's not a traditional horror flick about murder and mayhem or the supernatural.  The director, William Friedkin, directed The Exorcist.

I highly recommend it.  Anyone else over here seen it?
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madupont
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« Reply #2185 on: October 16, 2007, 12:39:12 PM »

desdemona222b

I don't know if I could take it; but, Metairie,Louisiana is the place for it, if you are going to start with a bug infestation. From there on you think,"now, who comes to mind for casting in that region. Not Eric Roberts, no! Let's go for Harry Connick,jr. if he can make it; and the usual Ashley Judd.".
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2186 on: October 16, 2007, 12:52:54 PM »

I like that tall guy who was in "Bug" - Michael Shannon.  He was funny in a small part in "Let's Go To Prison".
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #2187 on: October 16, 2007, 01:36:36 PM »

I thought Michael Shannon was fantastically bizarre - I'd be very surprised if he didn't end up in a David Lynch movie.

Maddie, the film is basically a psychological thriller.
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harrie
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« Reply #2188 on: October 16, 2007, 01:49:23 PM »

I've read a synopsis or two of Bug, and I'm intrigued.  I'm going to try and see it sometime this week.
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barton
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« Reply #2189 on: October 16, 2007, 02:12:06 PM »

I love quality horror -- consider "Bug" on my queue.

I think "The TV Set" is in my mailbox; I've heard from reliable sources it's a great comedy and you can't go too wrong with Sigourney Weaver and that guy who's married to Tea Leoni and looks disturbingly like me and once almost kissed Gillian Anderson.

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