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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33159 times)
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barton
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« Reply #2205 on: October 17, 2007, 02:09:29 PM »

Joke du Jour LOL'd.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2206 on: October 17, 2007, 02:48:59 PM »

Got about halfway through "Disturbia," which I could see being better on the big screen kind of putting you in the kid's room more, it's hard to identify with confinement malaise when you are looking at a 27" in. screen.  I thought the "radical sweets" joke fell really flat, like, uh, okay the kid likes snack food that is bad for him and once makes him puke or be in a hurry to sit down, or whatever.  Nope.  Wacky Asian Buddy?  Nope.  Mexican-American Italian language teacher has cousin that is cop with a hard-on for you, CLANGSIES.  Playing dumb marijuana song "when I got high," without our character smoking, nope, nothing seemed to work without a resounding clunk, but it hasn't made the turn toward killer thriller yet. 
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rmdig
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« Reply #2207 on: October 17, 2007, 04:29:50 PM »

I've watch three of Almadovar's films in the last few weeks.  One -- Live Flesh -- I mentioned in an earlier post.  Since then I've watched All About My Mother, and then today, Volver.  He is really stuck on recurrence (eternal return).  But for him it seems always confined to the recurrence of negative events.  Bad Karma, I guess.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2208 on: October 17, 2007, 09:36:23 PM »



I've been off a while from most of the forums.  So I'll recap my thoughts on Tom Hanks (albeit a week or two too late).

The Road to Perdition; from what I saw in that prevue with Paul Newman playing opposite Tom Hanks and what their relationship was, I willingly entered the compact. It was an amazing production  of what life was like among gangsters in the 1930s.   

Mad, I think I mentioned Road To Perdition a couple of months back.  This was a fantastic movie IMO.  If alone on a Friday Night, I would much rather curl up on the sofa with this one than The Godfather.  I won't go into great detail now unless someone else wants to spend more time on it.  To me the Godfather was a story and a good one but still a story.  Road To Perdition touched me at a very personal level.  I think being a parent makes this a different experience also.  Trying to comprehend losing half your family and how to protect the remaining son while at the same time seeking revenge was a fascinating portrait.

I like Tom Hanks in general.  Liked him in Bosom Buddies.  Liked him in The Man with One Red Shoe,  silly slapstick comedies and enjoyed watching him make the transition to more serious actor -- very much the way Robin Williams did.   Liked him in the romantic comedies--Sleepless in Seattle, et al.    Liked him in Saving Private Ryan.  In fact I've lliked him in almost everything I've seen him in.    I think looking at the bulk of his work, I would be hard pressed to say that he didn't have range...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2209 on: October 17, 2007, 09:44:16 PM »

Right now at this very moment it's

Alejandro AmenĂ¡bar's The Others...


Was this the one with Niocole Kidman?  If so -- agree that it was a splendid film.  Sort of like Sixth Sense though in that you can never watch it a second time the same way...fun to watch it a second and third time to see the complexities that you missed.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2210 on: October 17, 2007, 09:58:35 PM »

Joke du Jour LOL'd.


wouldn't that be L'dOL...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2211 on: October 17, 2007, 10:00:13 PM »

Jbottle


I didn't think Knocked Up was all that funny.  It was ok, but lacking...
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jbottle
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« Reply #2212 on: October 17, 2007, 11:31:46 PM »

...Steve Carrell, yeah, I didn't see it yet and got extremely bored with the pronounced PG-13 of "Disturbia," it was kind of star management with a lot of creaks and groans, he can't drink or smoke pot or masturbate, but he's a little bit of a freak, from punching out the Hispanic Italian teacher that has a cousin to watch him while he works out the home detention, without other than teen longing for the girl...I get it, but it's no fun and Shia is like 20 now, make a big boy movie...and hey, I like the popcorn, but the jokes fell flat and even though I like the inventive way of using a suburban sprawl location to limit costs, mom taking away the tv and video game privileges of a 17 yr. old that Shia was playing in the movie for not doing his laundry just rang NOPE.

It was just a very frugal careful HOMAGE to "Rear Window," with the only good "joke" being that he can't leave the house because his femur isn't broken but because he has an ankle bracelet on...okay, I get it...but the fact that he likes video games, the hot girl next door, and junk food isn't cutting it for me...there was nothing CHARACTER other than...

SPOILER ALERT

...they off his pops in the PROLOGUE...which is a good reason to hit your Hispanic Italian teacher, but seriously, RED BULL, HERSHEYS, etc., you were really tugging the lol with the kid hungry for junk food, maybe I'm just too hard on the thing but why not punch it up a little for the 15 yr. old let's say...
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jbottle
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« Reply #2213 on: October 17, 2007, 11:34:20 PM »

It's sad when fucking "Teen Wolf" had more balls.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2214 on: October 17, 2007, 11:36:57 PM »

There's an (eek) KEG PARTY, but Shia he TRANSITION FROM DISNEY YOU FEEL ME, oh, okay, and TW was rated PG, meaning EVERYBODY WHO GOT DROVE THERE.
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barton
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« Reply #2215 on: October 18, 2007, 10:38:40 AM »

Another report on Disburbia to further cement my resolve to give it a pass.   Putting "Rear Window" in suburbia sounds cute on the face of it, but then I think about the urban 'scape in RW and how it shaped the whole mood and mise-en-scene....and it doesn't seem right to transplant.  Still, if it shows up free on the boob tube, I might have a look.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2216 on: October 18, 2007, 10:52:26 AM »

Still, if it shows up free on the boob tube, I might have a look.

David Morse single-handedly makes "Disturbia" watchable. 
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madupont
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« Reply #2217 on: October 18, 2007, 12:32:27 PM »

Did anyone else ever see the Rear Window remake with Christopher Reeves? Can no longer recall how it compares over all with Jimmy Stewart.
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barton
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« Reply #2218 on: October 18, 2007, 12:50:26 PM »

Wow, I'd forgotten about the Chris Reeve remake.  I vaguely remember it, which I guess isn't very high praise.  For that storyline, though, you've got some serious Method acting.

I realize that joke is in poor taste, and should add that I had nothing but admiration for Reeve and what seemed like a pretty gutsy and good-humored approach to his infirmity.
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madupont
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« Reply #2219 on: October 18, 2007, 01:23:12 PM »

Trojanhorse,

I have to agree that Tom Hanks totally convinced me of his "actorhood" in Road to Perdition, possibly because I was watching those comedies like Sleepless in Seattle go by until people got over computers (would you believe that the French actually made a version of this that was sort of interesting but probably funnier which depends on whether you have a French sense of humour?).   Although it was Paul Newman who surprised me unduly, Tom Hanks was no slouch about carrying off this role; and you are right -- there is something personal about it -- eerily so, in particular those fog shots that could have been shot off Lake Michigan. To me it was specifically about a lifestyle very much still around in my childhood.

I can recall a contretemps momentarily in the nytimes com.forums, it may have been the Western European forum when I discussed how leery my father was of gangsters(and it turned out he should have continued to keep it in mind even when the Depression was over)because how was I to know what sounded very prejudiced when he discouraged fraternization with Italian-Americans because "they are bomb makers". I now understand in retrospect to what he was referring in his lifetime before I came along, and also that he had some knowledge of Chicago during the Capone era and what "mob" violence combined with gang-warfare was like. He was, after all, a doctor.

Some both rather new forum posters as younger immigrants who came here from Europe can believe that violence when it occurs because of Chechen rebels -- or in places like Darfur-- is violence, simply could not believe that Al Capone was not fictional like Dick Tracy.  It was all "in the movies", "on tv", to them.

This film was so authentic in "production values" that Tom Hanks drove the car we and the neighbors drove, Tom Hanks wore the coat that Dad and our friends wore. The homes shown in this film were exact replicas.  Since Hanks is not as old as Paul Newman, I can't say that he was around at the time to recall this atmosphere; so, it has to be that he
really got into the character and became one with it.

That is why as history of a time, it differs from the history shown in The Godfather although, the young  De Niro scenes, shot in a small sector that remains in Lower Manhattan, during San Gennaro feast day celebrations,has to be called "Italian-American" history in authenticity The rest of the story line in this and sequential films begins to deviate into "story" for the sake of the film, whether it is Diane Keaton or Marlon Brando or another particular actor whose name I can't think of at the moment who is your neighbor in every Italian community in the country because he also is a member of your parish.

One actor, I did know personally. I just didn't know that he had been in the Godfather (and can't remember if it was Godfather 2 or Godfather 3); but he had to be in it, for the nostalgia of having been born in that neighborhood and I think it was a trip back in time personally for him. He does a courtroom scene, and I guess that was what he was really familiar with(or, as Joe Pesce would have said, from "his yout"). Gregory Corso has a walk-on of all of less than two or three minutes and was so nervous that he flubbed his lines but Coppola let it stay, the editor did not cut it.  A guy, who was absolutely confident in getting up in front of an audience to read his audacious poetry, turned out to be camera shy,not so much when it was moving-pictures, as he had appeared in Pull My Daisy but, maybe he was "impressed" by the presence of all those famous actors whom he had imitated from afar?
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