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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33886 times)
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2295 on: October 25, 2007, 07:01:18 PM »

Here is a short student film that I did at USC Film School:


I recognize the buildings...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #2296 on: October 25, 2007, 07:04:45 PM »

Attitude change?


You do know that Steve Carell and Stephen Colbert are not the same person right?
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #2297 on: October 25, 2007, 09:14:51 PM »

Quote
I don’t think JulietteB and KirstenST appeared in a scene together but in any case Juliette was upstaged IMO. It’s increasingly difficult to watch her these days and I’m not sure why.

Not for me, I thought Binoche was terrific in EP, and when I think of the movie, it's her I recall. I first saw her in Blue and was mightily impressed.  But I haven't seen any recent work of hers, so wonder what you're thinking of in your comment. 

For another "overcome by sudden passion" scene, the one on the floor of the closet (I think) in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? still stands out in my mind. 
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madupont
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« Reply #2298 on: October 25, 2007, 09:44:12 PM »


Quote
I don’t think JulietteB and KirstenST appeared in a scene together but in any case Juliette was upstaged IMO. It’s increasingly difficult to watch her these days and I’m not sure why.

Not for me, I thought Binoche was terrific in EP, and when I think of the movie, it's her I recall. I first saw her in Blue and was mightily impressed.  But I haven't seen any recent work of hers, so wonder what you're thinking of in your comment. 

For another "overcome by sudden passion" scene, the one on the floor of the closet (I think) in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? still stands out in my mind. 


Here's my impression. When Peloux said this, unquote, I thought, okay, difference in how men view "one of the most passionate (albeit brief) love scenes" from what a woman may perceive.   I perceive a number of variable love scenes in this film. Peloux describes graphically a physical event.  I saw another one in a bath tub in Cairo or where-ever when Fiennes sings to Scott-Thomas in an unknown language, a melody that is quite beautiful, and then makes  up a story about his nannie/nursemaid singing this to him in Hungarian but, since Lazlo really is, perhaps he was not pulling her leg although he could have in the bathtub where she supposed it must be something more exotic but how exotic can you get between North Africa and Hungary?

Then there are all the endearing Binoche, with Kip scenes, although I suspect Peloux may recall her opposite Jeremy Irons with her skirt probably over her head behind the sofa and her black fine denier hosiery waving in the air in a mad passionate tussle. Damage, by Louis Malle/David Hare

He finds it hard to watch her these days. Wonders why? I say "Attitude change",first noticed in interview for Charlie Rose; she vamped him completely and I almost said the other day but bit my tongue she could have been trying out for a replay as Louise Brooks does Lulu, and Pandora's Buchse.

Trojanhorse calls me on this, "You do know that Steve Carell and Stephen Colbert are not the same person right?  But of course I do not see the bearing.

Especially, since he recognized the building as USC film school.

My recent fave was  La Veuve de Saint-Pierre. I wish that I had seen her do Aurore Dudevant. And, i have always noted her resemblence to my mother, same coloring,same nose, etc. same petite size, same femme fatale with complete naturalism, speech pattern halted or distracted considering how which words should be used, etc.

So why would I care who is Steve Carell?
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jbottle
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« Reply #2299 on: October 25, 2007, 11:35:05 PM »

Okay, Oscar is upon us:

"Zodiac"

That's all I've got.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2300 on: October 26, 2007, 02:51:27 AM »

I'm watching "Short Cuts," and I'm finding that Raymond Carver has a very bleak view of the short human experiment.  I think it's a great movie, but I don't find that level of disconnection between people.  Maybe I'm wrong, and the truth is somewhere inbetween, but I read the book, and Altman, known misanthrope, tells Carver's stories in a way that is a wonder of assimillation of book and movie, and yet, there seems, with Altman always a level of irony and dispassionate storytelling at times that seems at odds with the subject.  I'm getting ready to go back to watching, but I think that Altman has a glimmer of hope in his storytelling, or irony, or whimsy, but I think that he's also true to the flatness of Carver at the same time.  Delivery, dead on arrival, but, that little spark of humor, and it may well be in Carver too, delivers at least the film from being a Southern California tour of the absurd, which is after all, given Altmans experience there, and Carver's tour on earth, a little sad, but too shallow to be too deep ultimately, a pothead's take on an alcoholics view of humanity, more transcendental than bleak, but there's a fine line.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2301 on: October 26, 2007, 07:14:30 AM »



Some More Great Film Criticism from JBottle


"Like I said, you can bring a pussy to a movie, but you can't help him understand it."


Scene from Tod Browning's Freaks (1932) with Roscoe in drag, having a spat with Hercules about their performance. The script synopsis reveals that act featured Hercules rescuing "Roman Lady" Roscoe from a wild bull.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 07:28:42 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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barton
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« Reply #2302 on: October 26, 2007, 10:52:10 AM »

Jbot -- good call.  Add "Michael Clayton."  MC is too good to review.  If anyone's seen it, just be sure you have the red folders and the blue folders straight.

Just saw "Bug."

When I'm not flossing, reading, or picking names for my future grandchildren that will ensure their unique placement in the International White Pages (how about "Porquino Chitlun-Borg Nodule" ?  There can't be more than one, right?),  I watch movies.  I watch them to be amused, edified, wrung through the emotional wringer and left cleansed and chock-full of schadenfreude, and sometimes even to be mindfucked into a zenlike state of rapture and ineffability.  Sometimes, as when I watched "Bug," the goal (apparently) was acute discomfort and mystification as to why okay off-Broadway plays need to be converted into films.

At first, I was thinking, "Hmmm, someone called up Edward Albee and said, 'write us a screenplay of how YOU would have done 'Conspiracy Theory.'  And you can't have Julia Roberts."  Later, it seemed to shift towards an unholy alliance of David Lynch and David Mamet.  The abominations kept shifting on me and I struggled to keep up.

Mainly, I wanted it to end.  When the room was coated with aluminum foil, I really wanted it to end.  At every juncture where Michael Shannon would rave insanely or Ashley Judd would rave insanely or they would frantically pick invisible bugs off themselves or yank out teeth with pliers or stab holes in themselves with pins, I peered at the screen between my fingers and begged for them to please stop.
But the madness beat at me like the poorly-tuned calliopes of Purgatory, drilling into my brain something about paranoia (hey, I knew about that already!) or the power of love and the folie-a-deux that it can induce (knew about that, too!) or maybe something deeper that somehow was drowned in the static of pretentious artiness and caricature.

Sorry, Desdemona, I can't join you in praise of "Bug."




 
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madupont
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« Reply #2303 on: October 26, 2007, 10:59:48 AM »

Wasn't she the viewer who told me it wasn't about an infestation of bugs in Louisiana?

Anyway, Barton, I'm going out to see Michael Clayton as soon as I have my bath and wash my hair.  What was that about red and blue folders?
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barton
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« Reply #2304 on: October 26, 2007, 11:12:08 AM »

That would be telling. Cheesy
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harrie
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« Reply #2305 on: October 26, 2007, 11:18:16 AM »

I was under the impression that desdemona came here to discuss Bug, not to praise it.

Nonetheless, initially I was a little, um, agog; but with a little time, reflection, and distance it didn't exactly grow on me, but became semi digestion-worthy.  Except for that one pliers scene. Cannot, will not watch that part again.

Possible Spoiler: I spent some time trying to figure out if the whole thing was in Ashley Judd's mind and whether any of these other characters existed in the real world.  Then I started thinking Ashley Judd and Michael Shannon were going nuts together, basically coking or cracking out.   Not to go all Nancy Reagan, but I can't tell you what kind of water pipe thingy that was, so if I'm wildly off on the drug of choice, my apologies.  Essentially, I saw it as a big metaphor for insanity, or the trip to there, anyway.

Barton, you really didn't love "I am the Super Mother Bug!" or whatever that line was?
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barton
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« Reply #2306 on: October 26, 2007, 11:35:48 AM »

Oh, I liked that line, but not perhaps in a good way.  I mean, if the film hasn't won you over by that point, you may be reaching the point where you giggle inappropriately at this rather climactic moment and I'm pretty sure that's not the mood that Friedkin, or the original playwright, was going for.  But, then, that's part of the larger problem I had, which was an overall pulling away from the scenes and not engaging with the mood that the lighting and sets and actions suggested.

As for "it's all in her head," I wasn't really thinking along those lines, though there have been plenty of films where it crosses my mind, as in the film "Stay."

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barton
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« Reply #2307 on: October 26, 2007, 11:37:12 AM »

I refer all waterpipe questions to Jbottle or Oilcanboyd, the resident experts in such matters.

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harrie
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« Reply #2308 on: October 26, 2007, 11:38:04 AM »

And while William Friedkin of all people doesn't need me defending him, which I'm really not anyway -- as director of Bug, I think he did an okay job.  While the story may be questionable/strangely written,  I found Friedkin's telling of the story pretty effective.  As in, didn't you (barton) mention, maybe somewhere else, about feeling scratchy and squirmy for a couple days?  Or maybe that was me.  To me, Bug staying with you -- I know there's a bad joke in there somewhere -- is somewhat indicative that Friedkin did his part with this flick.  

To make my argument even broader, I didn't think The Exorcist was a great story in itself.  It's a basic spooky possession story with some gratuitous religious desecration (is that the word I want?) and sex-type stuff thrown in -- really nothing new or different  Yet, in Friedkin's hands it became a suspenseful thriller, for which he won the Best Director Oscar-TM.   I know I'm painting with a seriously broad brush right now, but I don't hold Bug against Friedkin.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #2309 on: October 26, 2007, 12:36:10 PM »

Maddie -

Wasn't she the viewer who told me it wasn't about an infestation of bugs in Louisiana?

It isn't.  It doesn't take place in Louisiana and

<spoileralert>

the bug infestation isn't real.

harrie and barton -

Okay, the motherbug declaration was silly, but I enjoyed the movie.  For what it's worth, it was also well received by the critics.  (I know,  I know, that doesn't mean squat.

Harrie, that was a crack pipe.
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