Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33676 times)
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barton
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« Reply #2310 on: October 26, 2007, 12:55:12 PM »

Harrie, you're right that Friedkin knows his craft and certainly needs no defense -- if I was making an objection, it might be to his choice of project, not what he did with it.  This might be ones of those films that I can honestly dislike and yet still acknowledge its power.   Yes, I wanted to scratch in those hard-to-reach places for some time after. 


One other thing, and this is a nitpick, but the place shown is not "in the middle of Oklahoma," unless the Mojave has expanded considerably in the past couple years.  I should be used to this -- the "Nebraska" in John Dahl's "Joy Ride" was actually Nevada -- and plenty of westerns set on the high plains have been shot no further from the studio than Griffith Park.  In this claustrophobic film, it doesn't matter all that much.


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"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
harrie
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« Reply #2311 on: October 26, 2007, 01:00:36 PM »

Okay, then -- when the doctor smokes crack with Judd, illusion or truly wacky doc?  And if illusion, is the doc himself an illusion?  Then why does everyone else (ex-husband, friend) see him?  Or are they all hallucinations and in on this whole thing?  While Bug wasn't the best movie I've ever seen, I didn't dislike it all that much.  Once you accept, or possibly embrace, the WTF factor, it becomes a bizarre, but sort of interesting ride.

The one little thing that I noted was that, for living in a fleabag motel type of place, Ms. Judd's room was awfully roomy, maybe even kind of palatial.  Maybe the Presidential or honeymoon suite?
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barton
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« Reply #2312 on: October 26, 2007, 01:04:26 PM »

Or maybe the guy and Judd are really heroes, who have exterminated a race of superbugs that would otherwise have taken over the human race and caused untold suffering.   Maybe....they're not crazy at all, eh?

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harrie
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« Reply #2313 on: October 26, 2007, 01:37:05 PM »

Desdemona, as long as I'm around here discussing some of the stuff I watch, you have absolutely no need to qualify liking or disliking something.
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harrie
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« Reply #2314 on: October 26, 2007, 01:51:05 PM »

Speaking of which, I saw Spanglish the other day, and didn't hate it.  I think eveyrone I know has ragged on it mercilessly, but I just couldn't muster up the hate for the flick.  I did take exception to the characterization of Adam Sandler's character as a laid-back chef, because I know a few chefs -- admittedly, not hundreds or anything -- and have never yet met a laid-back one.  Never mind one that's successful in a place like LA, getting stars, etc.   Yet, this was a Sandler characterization I could actually watch, even if it's like they didn't ask him to do much anyway. 

I thought Tea Leoni stole the flick.  I remember when Leoni kept getting TV shows that execs were sure would be breakout vehicles for her huge talent, etc.   And after a while, I started thinking she was just another TV bimbo, albeit a little more intelligent or at least intelligent-looking, than your average bimbo.  Who married pretty well.  I take that all back.  I mean this as a compliment, but I thought she nailed the role of self-absorbed psycho bitch on wheels who doesn't necessarily mean to be one but can't figure out how to be anything else.

The story was eh -- okay, but not earth-shattering.  Still, I don't get the hate for this flick that I've heard from others.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2315 on: October 26, 2007, 01:59:31 PM »

Time for a critical re-evaluation?:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113451/
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harrie
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« Reply #2316 on: October 26, 2007, 02:16:32 PM »

I was sure that was going to be http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0416243/
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2317 on: October 26, 2007, 03:41:11 PM »



The Big Sleep (1946)


Faulkner wrote "The Big Sleep"………..


Faulkner didn’t write The Big Sleep.

Raymond Chandler wrote it.

Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman wrote the screenplay.

There’s a huge difference between any NOVEL and a SCREENPLAY.

Faulkner and Howard Hawks consulted Chandler about the NOVEL throughout the SCREENPLAY writing process, e.g. they even called Chandler to see who killed the young chauffeur in love with Carmen Sternwood. He ended up off a dock in the Pacific Ocean… dead and not from a broken-heart either.

Raymond Chandler just shrugged… Who cares he said…

And I’m getting to that point myself… about a lot of things...

You keep making these wild assertions about Films and Writers and Directors (want to see a List?Huh)—without doing any Research or Reading or even Seeing the Movie. Just one-line know-it-all snarky posts...

That’s why I created the Movie Club—to Elucidate Cinema…not Obscure it the way you’re constantly doing it…

This isn’t the NYTimes anymore—your hot-dogging film crit is bourgeois and lacks substance.

For example, it’s obvious you haven’t seen nor want to see the Films we’re discussing—Pan’s Labyrinth, Pandora’s Box and Threepenny Opera. Any yet you constantly post there almost proud of yourself...

Which is your loss…not mine.

You could learn a lot about yourself and Wiemar/Nazi cinema...

If you would just swallow your pride and WATCH Threepenny Opera...

Pabst and Brecht/Weil... they're very relevant now to us...

« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 03:43:28 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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desdemona222b
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« Reply #2318 on: October 26, 2007, 03:43:22 PM »

Desdemona, as long as I'm around here discussing some of the stuff I watch, you have absolutely no need to qualify liking or disliking something.

Thanks, but no problem - everyone has different taste and so on.  The scene with the doctor was really baffling - I didn't even think the boyfriend existed for awhile.  What I saw as most significant about that scenes was the camera shots switching from inside to outside - inside, choppers shaking the place to smithereens, outside, quiet and calm.

I like unresolved stories, and the first scene with all the foil everywhere was so shocking to me that I couldn't quite figure out what had happened at first.  
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peloux
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« Reply #2319 on: October 26, 2007, 04:20:54 PM »

>>>>Then there are all the endearing Binoche, with Kip scenes, although I suspect Peloux may recall her opposite Jeremy Irons with her skirt probably over her head behind the sofa and her black fine denier hosiery waving in the air in a mad passionate tussle. Damage, by Louis Malle/David Hare

I haven’t seen Damage, but wow, it goes on my queue, imm-ed-ia-te-ment !!! Seems ideal, especially for a lout like me (men, you know).  What’s wrong with passionate scenes anyway? Does a “graphic” description automatically mean that it must be the perception of some beastly man? … Seriously though, I thought that scene convincing, more in an artful and dramatic way than in a prurient way.

Juliette was spot on perfect in Blue. There isn’t a  single false note in anything she does in the film, very assured and totally convincing.  I just haven’t liked her much of late though there is a lot I haven’t seen, so what do I know.  It’s just a personal thing.  I didn’t care for Chocolat and I haven’t liked her in some of stuff she did for Hanake. She has an excellent scene in Code Unknown where she finds herself in a garage or warehouse and is told by someone unseen (she reacts to the camera) that she will never leave that place and will die there. It’s a disturbing and chilling scene, definitely not my cup of tea, but she is letter perfect.   Later in the film she is harassed on a bus and breaks down but I thought her acting just terrible. She was okay in Cache but the role didn’t offer much.  She is not terrible in EP but she just didn’t do it for me. I’m wrong to compare her with Kristin, they are just too different and have their own niche, but I admit to being taken with the elegant beauty and screen presence of the latter and just thought that of the two she sort of ran away with it.

I think it was Harrie above who used yellow text to cover a spoiler. What a great idea! In order to read it easily, you have to highlight it.  A couple of posts later someone revealed something about Bugs that may have finished it forever for me. The line between what constitutes a spoiler and what does not can be murky but there are somethings that are definate no-nos and the use of yellow text is a very fine idea.
   
 
 
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harrie
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« Reply #2320 on: October 26, 2007, 07:20:20 PM »

I think it was Harrie above who used yellow text to cover a spoiler. What a great idea!

But not mine, I must admit.  I've seen it done other places; and I may well have been the one to have spoiled Bug later on, as I figured we were out in the open with talking about it.  If so, my apologies.

For the record, my latest Juliette Binoche viewing was Jet Lag on IFC (?).   She's so beautiful -- and aging gracefully so far, I may also mention --  that I don't always notice the good acting or bad acting part. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2321 on: October 26, 2007, 07:31:35 PM »

You're not the forum moderator or a very insightful "elucidator," either, so post what you want to post, including dumb poems demeaning Faulkner, and mind you're own business about whether I read or respond to your posts or not.  I'm not going to stay on thread if I don't feel like it so you may as well get used to it.  I haven't dominated and drama-queened the forum like you have and I haven't commented on the fact that you think it's your personal domain to incessantly harangue with your effusive psychobabble.  But now I did.  I don't care what you think.  Deal with it.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2322 on: October 26, 2007, 08:01:00 PM »

And Faulkner wrote "The Big Sleep," too:

"There’s a huge difference between any NOVEL and a SCREENPLAY."

Yeah, that's my point, and a lot of the snappy dialogue was Faulkner's, like the bit about horse-racing, etc., but yes, of course Chandler wrote the novel. 

You can start Novel Club and talk about Novels, there's a new project for you, but you know, this is Movie Club, and when I say "wrote 'The Big Sleep'" I'm talking about the SCREENPLAY, but if this were NOVEL CLUB, I could understand your confusion.

Hi, harrie.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2323 on: October 26, 2007, 10:20:33 PM »

Art-school boy of italics vs. crude drunk frat-boy humor, I get it, let's move on.
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harrie
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« Reply #2324 on: October 26, 2007, 10:50:10 PM »

Hi, jbottle.  See any good movies lately?
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