Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 38406 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #2325 on: October 27, 2007, 12:47:39 AM »

Peloux,re:#2316
"The English Patient had one of the most passionate (albeit brief) love scenes I’ve ever seen. Fienne’s character manages to excuse himself from the get-together in the patio and arrange a meeting with KST. He puts her against a wall and she is so overcome with passion that she bites anything she can get hold of, which happened to be his finger."

Actually, that's all you said, within three sentences.  "What’s wrong with passionate scenes anyway? Does a “graphic” description automatically mean that it must be the perception of some beastly man? …"

Nothing is wrong. But just wait until you reach the age where -- you view them objectively.  It's really quite interesting when you do and find that other people's sex life is very matter of fact not terribly interesting and you get a weird sense of timing on it as well, like with a stop-watch. It is what it is, and it is over. Meanwhile lengthy earnest plots are made of it, so you are very lucky at a certain age if you see the humor in it. Quite possibly sexual interaction of other people appears to be quite boring and you finally have no interest in any other than your own sex-life.

"Does a “graphic” description automatically mean that it must be the perception of some beastly man? …"

Not at all.   As I've probably written more graphic descriptions than most men because the genre was specifically poems of an "erotic" nature. After realizing what Norman Mailer was up to in his writing, I merely had to go for it. Although sometimes I accidentally call him Normal Manner; and more recently, Morman Nailer.

"Seriously though, I thought that scene convincing,"....  With Raf Fiennes, it is always convincing. He seems to have a special knack. Including staying in practice at great heights while in flight. This started a rumor that he had an unquenchable desire to get it on. (When actually,it instead led to a new fad among airborne service-personnel, in a round of copy-catting, to see how long they could get away with it before it came to the attention of the company for whom they work and they get called on the carpet for it.)

Which is why I truly recommend, Oscar and Lucinda, for one of the funnier serious passions shared by Fiennes and Cate Blanchett, which of course isn't sex although every busy-body else reads that into their relationship anyway.  In fact the defloration of Oscar's  virginity is one of the funnier set ups; which, you are of course allowed to see it coming, if you can pardon the pun.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2326 on: October 27, 2007, 01:19:01 AM »

No, hars, I haven't, but I tend to watch all of "Carlito's Way" or "The Wild Bunch," or "Scarface," or get pulled into "Chinatown," on the Movie Channels, I mean, my last three Netflix pix, "Disturbia" (yawn), the other one, yawn, and then "Zodiac," which I thought was great.

Great movie movie, and even with "Fight Club," and especially "Alien 3" you kind of have to like Fincher to like those movies a lot and I do, everybody thought that A3 was a studio disaster by an indulgent director and I saw a really good movie with some political thought and excitement.  It was the big movie to go over budget after "Waterworld," which is very entertaining, and by the way, don't give up on "Alien: Ressurection," the one with Winona from Jeunet, very funny take on the whole thing.

But "Zodiac," if you haven't seen it, is just great, it gets a lot of facts into a relatively short time frame, which doesn't make it a "short" movie because it goes over 2 hrs. and that's my (yawn) point ordinarily, but on this one it kind of had to be exactly as long as it was because there was too much story and you could nearly tell it all by testing the audience's patience a little, and you have to have room for character without just a fact clipboard that you're checking off, and it's all there.

I still want to see "Gone Baby Gone" and "Michael Clayton," but then I would have to mingle with the fizz-slurping sugar junkie Skittle gangbanger wanna be's of every persuasion, and I can always just catch "Carlito" or something on cable.  I'm more of a loner solo matinee guy at heart, that way nobody talks about candy or anything, and now, with the significant bother, I would have to lie to say I went to something and didn't wait to go see...and it's problematic, that, me, I just want to blow off work and go to more matinees, and that's my pledge or upcoming new year's resolution.

I want to start seeing everything.  And with nobody around.  Hell I saw "Derailed" 14 times and can't remember the plot point at the end of ACT ONE, I THINK JACK GYLLENGALL BOUGHT A COWBOY HAT.  Cheers.
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madupont
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« Reply #2327 on: October 27, 2007, 01:25:01 AM »

Barton, saw Michael Clayton this afternoon; and you are right, impossible to say anything because Clooney's done it again. He's on a roll, stacking up projects accomplished where he's worked out the most interesting methods of revealing something you ought to and have got to know about.

In this case, this Corporate hitch, we've got going and hear about quite regularly as a political reference but not always quite sure what that signifies.  This lays it out neatly.

I am going to make just a single comment because I'm sure it will not give anything away but is a quirk, used by Tilda Swinton that made her role resoundingly real, and that is the way she meticulously readjusted her wardrobe for the day, with these little grooming gestures, to perfect the appearance of the line of something from another angle in the mirror or the fall of the fabric to where it had the best effect; and after striding off with perfect carriage, as if she had been put through her paces for the responsibility by the Queen of England herself, inevitably appeared on camera at as  dowdy an angle as the cameraman could pull.

But, back to Clooney. Some of his other fellow executive producers or producers in evidence are Anthony Minghella of whose work I have been speaking earlier, Steven Soderbergh with whom Clooney just recently worked in,The Good German, and seems to have had a darker-lighting perspective throughout which one would not off hand attribute to Minghella for instance; although you probably noted that when the great Sydney Pollack is on camera, he doesn't allow for anything other than being seen in the best light so that there is never any mistaking any of his intentions for other than the starkly candid and blunt appraisals that they are. There's an interesting soundtrack as well, from first brooding percussions in intervals that proceed the drama as if we are about to witness a Greek Tragedy, to the rolling of the credits backed by a modernist score.
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peloux
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« Reply #2328 on: October 27, 2007, 03:58:48 AM »

>>>>>and I may well have been the one to have spoiled Bug later on, as I figured we were out in the open with talking about it.  If so, my apologies.

Harrie: For the record, it wasn’t you … but I should say that the post in question did, in fact, offer a spoiler alert and I kept on reading, so it was my fault.  It is difficult to put on the brakes, the reason for which I thought the use of yellow a particularly good idea.

Madupont: I sense you may have taken too seriously some of my remarks. I might have used emoticons for clarity. What you wrote is interesting nonetheless.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #2329 on: October 27, 2007, 07:55:07 AM »

I thought The Good German was OK but nothing special.  It seemed to have a lot of elements of The Third Man with a bit of Gravity's Rainbow thrown in and even historic footage to give it all an air of verismilitude.  Clooney took more hits in this movie than Mike Hammer, including getting kicked around by Toby Maguire, which I found kind of funny.  Still, the movie moved well and that's most important.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2330 on: October 27, 2007, 09:08:41 AM »




"...including dumb poems demeaning Faulkner..."


Literary Criticism?

Capt. Francesca 'Franky' Cook: “Jbottle. The literary critic.
I've heard so much about you. It's a pleasure to finally
meet the competition.”


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“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #2331 on: October 27, 2007, 09:39:17 AM »


Well, geez, one of my cats watches an awful lot of movies,
but I don't think he understands them too much.


Harriette

Yawn, I guess he's just another dumb pussy....
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“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
desdemona222b
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« Reply #2332 on: October 27, 2007, 11:22:33 AM »

peloux -

I apologize if I "spoiled" Bug for you, but I did put in a spoiler alert.  I can't read the yellow text very well myself, especially at work.  I don't know how we're supposed to discuss a movie if we can't talk about certain scenes, etc, and a spoiler alert won't suffice.  Anyway, the denouement and many other things about the movie were not revealed by that remark.
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barton
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« Reply #2333 on: October 27, 2007, 11:33:49 AM »

Jbottle -- I think Michael Clayton would be worth your while -- and a contender with Zodiac for the top of the list.  MADUPONT, I was also admiring of Tilda Swinton's creation of a real woman, all her tics and doubts crowding in on her as things go to hell, and the choice not to just have your stock corporate villain.  I liked the scenes where she's adjusting herself, or rehearsing her words --- flawless acting.  This is not a movie that Clooney just dominates, all the featured actors were excellent -- I like the scene with Tom Wilkinson in the alley, holding like 40 baguettes and starting out pretty crazy but, as soon as the matter of commitment comes up, his mind instantly sharpens and he gives this lucid and brilliant lecture on commitment laws and legal issues in various states.  If there are weak links in MC, I have yet to be made aware of them.  The whole thing with the horses is a brilliant example of a scene that contains no dialog but tells volumes.

Puget -- your comments to Jbot belong over in Movie Club.  That "we" that you seem so ready to deploy in your statements, is pretty much talking current film over here, so...seen any good current films recently?

Desdem -- I think SPOILERS is a sufficient measure to alert readers.  I think the burden is mainly on the person who hasn't seen a film -- I tend to scroll past chat about a film I haven't seen, so as to avoid spoilers and just generally avoid to much pre-thinking the film.





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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2334 on: October 27, 2007, 11:46:12 AM »

I saw the "Michael Clayton" preview and it looked great.  It also looked very blue - was the actual movie like that?  Not blue to the extent of "Payback", but still pretty blue.  Not that that's a problem or anything... I liked "Payback" and I also liked "Zodiac", which was indeed very yellow, as was noted in Jbottle's review here.

I'm wondering about the "MC" title though - I mean, what about:

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/ClayMi00.htm  ?

I know that QT likes to tap the pro sports world for names: Clarence Worley in "TR", Marsellus Wallace in "PF", Freddie Nieuwendyk in "RD", etc., and it's not just QT - - who could ever forget http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0102996/, in which the main character's name is Waymon Tinsdale?  But still, at least with all of those examples, they changed the spelling slightly or gave the guy a different first name or whatever.  In "MC" Tony Gilroy just takes the guy's name verbatim.

Not that it means the movie sucks or anything - I already thought it looked good, and what I'm reading here just reinforces that, but still, I can't help but thinking "poor guy" or whatever.

« Last Edit: October 27, 2007, 11:49:53 AM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #2335 on: October 27, 2007, 11:51:04 AM »

Barton,

"Recently, Mr. Clooney has served as a guide into a different country, one in which the media fail, capitalism kills and heroes stumble. His glamour and easy manner make these excursions feel less a matter of duty than of necessity; they provide the pleasure that softens the pain"..."he’s almost always good, and he’s a big enough star now that each new role feels as if he’s playing a version of himself. That’s O.K. We need George Clooney, just as we needed Warren Beatty — seducer of heavy hearts and troubled minds, the beautiful bearer of our very bad tidings." Mahnola Dargis  At New York Times, which has clip and slides.

(But, having seen it,  I think it is better to let the film surprise you.)  I could not help thinking of Lulu and our  attending  to  the tv series Damages, when I began to consider what to say or not to say last night about this film which brings Damages to mind with a plus for Michael Clayton.

On the big screen, you merely have to pay close attention to sight and sound as intellectual processing, and do not let yourself become side-tracked by the emotional bad-habits of human beings.

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2336 on: October 27, 2007, 11:52:51 AM »

Poor guy:

http://www.buccaneers.com/team/playerdetail.aspx?player=Clayton,Michael,80

Or heck, I don't know, I could be wrong - maybe he likes it that Tony Gilroy used his name, who knows?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2337 on: October 27, 2007, 11:53:25 AM »




Puget -- your comments to Jbot belong over in Movie Club. 


Really, my dear? Playing the Moderator game ho-hum.

Loosen up... be more like Jbottle... come on over to the Movie Club...

And post anything you want... just like he does.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2007, 11:56:57 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
madupont
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« Reply #2338 on: October 27, 2007, 12:07:55 PM »

 If Lorre is the avatar on these lines, are you offering them as a personal statement  requesting help?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2339 on: October 27, 2007, 02:11:41 PM »



Warming up, my dear, for Fritz Lang's M....

It's time to introduce some real Euro-decadence to this wonderful...

Group of enthusiastic klug Cineastes..........


 Smiley Smiley Smiley



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“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
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