Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33666 times)
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barton
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« Reply #2565 on: November 12, 2007, 10:16:37 AM »

BTW, did anyone see "Fracture" ?  Saw it last week, and wondered about what seemed a spacious plot hole regarding identical  guns and the habit which I think police have of checking serial numbers.  Also the legal twist seemed pretty obvious.  Not that I didn't enjoy Hopkins doing a quasi-Lecter and Gosling as his able foe.

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harrie
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« Reply #2566 on: November 12, 2007, 11:01:30 AM »

Coincidentally (re American Gangster), the real Nicky Barnes is complaining in today's NY Daily News that the movie wasn't totally accurate -- like, where Barnes was shown as a blip on the radar in Lucas' life, in reality Lucas was the blip on the radar in Barnes' life, etc. 

In case anyone's interested in his well-organized laundry list of complaints , here's the link - http://www.nydailynews.com/gossip/r_m/index.html 

My favorite part is "...I've read all of Shakespeare. I can quote his sonnets. I read Dickens, Melville, Emily Dickinson. I won a poetry contest against inmates from the entire prison system."
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madupont
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« Reply #2567 on: November 12, 2007, 11:13:16 AM »

In this case, gangsters were family, which is much appreciated by those of us who know what it is to live with extended family; there is a certain amount of embarrassment that goes with it, which is probably why church.  It's both a place where you can make restitution over the embarrassment and retain acceptance.  I find that attending funerals is about sufficient.

What did happen, inadvertently no doubt, as a result of buying this plot along with an interesting anti-hero who had two faces (which is another something characteristic that goes along with the extended family, you run into this personality-type from generation to generation and have to shrug and say,"He takes after his Daddy, doesn't he!" or, "You've got your uncle's voice.", which I admire Denzel for carrying off without reverting to a previous type, the gangsta who is the corrupted cop,from:
Training Day. Where he scared the heck out of Ethan Hawke but,then,Ethan, as an actor out of Princeton  needs to be scared, for his growth as an actor. You hear what I'm saying?) although what I meant to say was this had the side effect in casting.

It was a casting call that necessitated the hiring on of "celebrities" some of whom are wont to live both sides of the laws, which is exactly why they are celebrities. It goes with the territory where you live at. The result was in show-biz terms the biggist show-casing of potential black-actor-hood we have previously only imagined.  I happened to catch Ruby Dee the other night with Alicia Keys on Iconoclasts(new series),opportune indeed after just seeing her in the week ago's  American Gangster because she is getting a might old.  

But, it was a reminder of all the roles that she had played, particulary to me "how it all started", and you soon realize it gets political all the way. It is a risk you take for being born less white. Of course, nowadays, I consider that you all are going to get by--by the skin of your teeth, that's a Thornton Wilder-ism but when people are reading Nathanael West on the Depression forum, and that is not a Freudian slip, it is a sign of the times. The Day of the Locust is upon us again. I believe they had one African-American actor hired, okay, I'm exaggerating,in 1975, but then you could also say that it was cast in accordance with the "times" in which TDotL was "set".

Do not remind me of Raisin in the Sun, in which Ruby Dee likewise did her role. Like many an actress, she started between age 15-16 and her mother had to go to bat for her (as the mothers of women who act almost always do). I believe that was the movie in which we discovered Sidney Poitier. So times change; or, do they. Thus, from the beginning of her career right up to the minute, being an actor was doubly political.

Somehow, I don't think that Denzel Washington thought up this approach to the film all on his own.

But listening to "Mama Small's" inside stories of people that Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis were close to during the large historic political moments of the last half century made my jaw drop in awe. I knew about the other stuff, how one gets victimized for being political if you are a celebrity. Politicians usually think that they have to take you down a peg.
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madupont
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« Reply #2568 on: November 12, 2007, 11:21:55 AM »

Harrie,  I love it.  I think that Brian G. knew, as most anybody in CALIFORNIA, if you  had to rely on the mafia (although that may be true between Jersey and New York) for all of your recreational drugs, without the help of the government bringing it to you, we'd all be so clean there would be no need for rehab.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2569 on: November 12, 2007, 02:51:24 PM »

"Are right (as in correct, not as in right wing) minded movie folk allowed to capitalize on the anguish of war, congratulating themselves that their efforts are undertaken for the common good, never to be taken for war profiteers?"

In the case of "Lions for Lambs" the answer is that you have to make a profit first.  Also, it's a movie and it's the same argument that "24" capitalizes on fear and 9/11 while advertising drugs that make you not die and cars that you should own before you do, so while it's easy to whack Redford for "profiteering," there are far easier ways to make money in the movie business and this was a "prestige" picture that was probably always a break-even venture at best while other more exploitative fare wants you're wallet in the worst way.  So, (A) You have to make a profit to be called a profiteer, (B) Everyone does it; (C) There are ways to do it better; (D) And proceeds of the film are voluntary expenditures of private funds vs. no-bid contracts paid in tax money directly related to the war (Halliburton is the easy target here).

I don't refute your argument because I'm a liberal, which I am, but because I always think that the Hollywood arguments only prop up Hollywood as being important, and can't stand people who fault Sean Penn for traveling, you know, the freedom to say what you want and move around, that's constitutionally protected, as long as you aren't purporting to act on behalf of your government, give aid, money, or even advice to a named combatant, that would be treason, like say, releasing the name of a covert CIA operative and possibly blowing the cover of her assets and getting them killed in the field.

"Did anyone see 'Fracture'"?

Yes, in the theater, and I didn't really like it and the plot hole you name was pretty silly, but I had a good time at the movies even though it wasn't a very good movie.  I liked Gosling's ability to hold the camera and swagger around as a leading man in, basically, a Tom Cruise type role, confident, cool, but felt like it could have been funnier, and if you are writing dialogue for Hopkins you really have to give me 10-15 witty sick rejoinders or at least try, felt he was underused when they know they are making trash.  Basically my same knock on Mr. Brooks which we discussed, because it's a dumb movie, make it funny.  But Gosling and Hopkins did the best with what they had, but give Mamet or Tarantino or somebody $1M for a punch up on either film, and they would immediately realize that Hopkins has to be more bombastic and odd, and that William Hurt has to be more hectoring and Costner nastier and petulant.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2570 on: November 12, 2007, 02:59:51 PM »

...but felt like it could have been funnier, and if you are writing dialogue for Hopkins you really have to give me 10-15 witty sick rejoinders or at least try... give Mamet or Tarantino or somebody $1M for a punch up...

BOB

It's a lot different than doing lines of coke off the belly of a thousand-dollar-a-night hooker, isn't in Charles?

CHARLES

In what way?
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #2571 on: November 12, 2007, 03:02:35 PM »

For all of you horror fanatics......









I honestly expected the film to suck, but was gruesomely surprised
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"Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just."



--Thomas Jefferson
jbottle
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« Reply #2572 on: November 12, 2007, 04:33:19 PM »

But was it grotesque in a nazi/David Lynch way?
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jbottle
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« Reply #2573 on: November 12, 2007, 04:37:13 PM »

Charles:  Did you know you can make fire from ice?

Bob:  What?

Charles:  Fire, from ice...
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2574 on: November 12, 2007, 04:48:43 PM »

We can't killll the bearrrr, Charles....
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jbottle
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« Reply #2575 on: November 12, 2007, 04:58:36 PM »

Bob:  We can't expect them to come...

Charles:  No.

Bob:  Fire from ice...?
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2576 on: November 12, 2007, 08:32:18 PM »

Don't go native on me now, Bob...
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jbottle
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« Reply #2577 on: November 12, 2007, 11:40:38 PM »

Scott:  THIS is what it costs??

Avi:  THIS is what it costs YOU...

...you want my ADVICE...I think you're off RESERVATION

___


Daughter:  One man?

Scott:  One riot, one Ranger, you ever hear that??

Daughter:  Leonitas, King of Sparta, when a neighboring nation would petition for military assistance he would send ONE MAN, you ever HEAR that??

Scott:  No, I guess we went to different schools...

___

BAR INTERIOR
 
Agent:  [sees knife Scott is cleaning with a cocktail napkin] Nice piece...

Scott:  You like it?? I took it off this guy in...the...

Agent: ...He gave it to you...?

Scott:  No, as I recall he was reluctant to part with it...

Agent:  I always knew you Marines were a bunch of weepy son's a bitches...

Scott:  I got something in my eye...
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madupont
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« Reply #2578 on: November 12, 2007, 11:49:04 PM »

Dzimas,

     
  Conversations on Art
 
Visit | Membership | Shop | Exhibitions | Programs


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Thursday, November 15, 2007 at 7:00 pm

The Western in Myth and Metaphor
With artist Piotr Uklanski, actress Katarzyna Figura and critic Jim Hoberman

 
 
Piotr Uklanski, still from Summer Love, 2006. 35 mm film, color, sound; 93 minutes. Courtesy Polski Western, Gagosian Gallery, Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, and Galleria Massimo de Carlo

Join artist Piotr Uklanski, actress Katarzyna Figura, film critic Jim Hoberman and  curator Chrissie Iles  as they contextualize Uklanski's Summer Love within the classic American film genre of the Western. 


Admission: $8; senior citizens and students with  valid ID $6.  Advance  sales are strongly recommended, as space is limited.  Tickets  may be purchased at the Museum Admissions Desk or by visiting www.whitney.org.  All programs are free for members.  For Member reservations, please E-mail [email protected].


 

This program is co-presented by the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, www.PolishCulture-NYC.org.

Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Avenue at 75th Street
New York, NY 10021
1 (800) WHITNEY
http://www.whitney.org
Transportation
Subway: 6 to 77th Street (walk two blocks west to Madison Avenue)
Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4 to 75th Street



 

 
 
 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2579 on: November 13, 2007, 12:00:42 AM »

It's BYOASGOD....."bring your own art-school girl of doom..."
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