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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 51687 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #2745 on: December 05, 2007, 06:33:02 PM »

http://www.avclub.com/content/feature/random_roles_chris_elliott
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2746 on: December 05, 2007, 07:23:54 PM »

"Get A Life" is my favorite show of all time.

Great Random Roles there, especially the joke about Michael Mann getting mad when the audience laughs at the sight of Chris Elliott's face in "Manhunter".
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jbottle
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« Reply #2747 on: December 05, 2007, 09:27:48 PM »

I'm shooting for a matinee of NFCOM tomorrow or Fri., if possible, wish me luck.
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madupont
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« Reply #2748 on: December 05, 2007, 09:51:22 PM »

Listen up,jbottle,

There are people around here who would consider,Being John Malkovich, as "magic realism".  At least, I think they are "people".
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #2749 on: December 05, 2007, 10:58:31 PM »


But I keep trying to remember any time that she was kind
or humble or anything but supercilious and dismissive of
other people's opinions and experiences.


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“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
jbottle
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« Reply #2750 on: December 05, 2007, 11:08:17 PM »

No, I respect the imagination of Charlie Kaufman immensely, not realising that when I posted a kind of rip of Cusack that his interview would reveal that at the time he said throw me the most unproduceable movie, the wildest, most unconventional thing and then track it for me, and if I'm not the first one in the door then as my agents you're fired, he told the same story to Tasha Robinson of "The Onion" that he did to James what's his from "Actor Studio," but no, don't misunderstand my criticism, I was just saying that "I don't get it," not that there's nothing to get.  I know I'm not made to appreciate a lot of things that objectively a lot of people I respect say are good that I don't like, and I'm not being facetious at all, there are some things that I'm probably not going to understand or "get," and even some things that I think I "get" or "understand" that I "get" all wrong.  "Being John Malkovich" didn't resonate with me, and I know you were sorta making a joke, but I don't think it falls into the realm of magic realism either.  I could understand being inside a writer's head, the box, etc., but I don't think that's how the movie played, I thought the movie was smart when it was supposed to be funny and dim when it was supposed to be poignant, etc., I mean, I have no beef with Chuck Kauffman, at least not a "legitimate beef," and certainly no real criticism.  I just didn't think the movie was all that special or opened any doors.  I think that it got misinterpreted as "this clever idea" needs the best available indie cinematographist or we can't do it.....this movie will have to be lit by only the most starving of crazy non-studio brilliant freaks, I get it, but actually, it's harder to make a thriller that makes sense, no knock on "magic realism," or "Charles Kaufmann," but it's not a very good movie in my opinion as much as I wanted to like it, it was basically tantamount to me saying back in the day that "The Party Animal" was a better film than "Schindler's List," and I earnestly believe that as well, so consider the source, and I've considered that you're only kidding around with the "magic realism" joke, but I meant no offense to the imagination of Charlie Kauffmann at'all...respek, just that that particular one was not for me.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2751 on: December 06, 2007, 10:28:00 AM »

No, I respect the imagination of Charlie Kaufman immensely...

He wrote a few "Get A Life" episodes - not exactly a light-weight...
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barton
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« Reply #2752 on: December 06, 2007, 12:07:21 PM »

"In the "Onion" interview he says a couple of time "When you are doing an 'action movie'".....and I'm thinking, what your 5 min. in "Con Air"??"

Word.  Cusack is an ambience actor, i.e. his forte is stationing himself in gloomy places and then responding with some kind of urban edginess.   From the grimy darkness of a record shop to the midnights in Savannah's gardens of good and evil,  to the hells of motel and hotel, he's your man.

And off-topic:  Nebraska is somewhat less innocent today.

 
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #2753 on: December 06, 2007, 05:54:46 PM »

I saw. And worried about where you were.  Sometimes I suppose that you are really in Kansas past prime time for Dorothy and Toto but still aware there is a yellow-brick road through that part of the country.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2754 on: December 06, 2007, 07:16:59 PM »

I hate to say it but it probably really is video games, the problem, I mean.  I'm not in agreement with gov't interference in movies or games, but it's clear that shooter games are partially responsible for empowering nerds in a gun culture.  It makes total sense to me but both sides are horribly entrenched, NRA/Constitution gun vs. Hollywood/Bigmedia/Constitution speech...it's just a sad thing that people say is "hard to understand" when it's not hard to understand at all, it's just sad.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2755 on: December 06, 2007, 10:29:06 PM »

Link to hilarious Coen Bros interview.  I guess when you get asked the same questions over and over, you can work on some pretty funny answers, e.g.:

What’s the benefit of working together as brothers?

JC: I haven’t detected any benefit yet.

EC: We didn’t do it on purpose.

Have you ever thought of making a movie without the other one?

JC: Oh, we think about it all the time.

http://www.popmatters.com/pm/news/article/50750/qa-with-no-country-for-old-men-makers-joel-and-ethan-coen/
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jbottle
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« Reply #2756 on: December 07, 2007, 01:42:51 AM »

"One of your unproduced projects was `To the White Sea,’ an adaptation of James Dickey’s World War II novel about a U.S. flier downed in Japan. It was to be told almost entirely without dialogue. Was that on your mind while you were making this?"

"EC: Our getting to do this one made up for our not getting to do that one."

Sweet guys, and probably a turn of events that led them to a more lyrical and musical way of thinking about a movie, that helped them not fuck the Cormac McCarthy book up, I haven't read it, but if there is room for music and desolate space and no dialogue, you have to figure they were already there, and figured, as much as Cormac probably doesn't want us to fuck with his words, which he may or may not care about, the music will be a time when he won't wan't to kill us possibly.  I mean, I think a novelist would like that a filmmaker makes your novel into something not on the page, not only is that the idea, but if you are too literal or dim, you can ruin a guy with his own words, I guess.  Anything is also capable of being ordinary on film that sounds great in prose, but anyway, maybe that was their way of saying, what do you think about this?
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jbottle
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« Reply #2757 on: December 07, 2007, 01:49:19 AM »

I think I said the same thing twice there at the end but I'm on beeragain.
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madupont
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« Reply #2758 on: December 07, 2007, 11:49:17 AM »

jbottle,

Although that may have been his attempt at writing his experience in a prose form, and he is after all known to most people as the writer of the story-line for, Deliverance, which is a very moving and complex film, that I would imagine brought the Coen's to consider his WW2 experience, James Dickey was foremost a poet, and I guess that I wrote about him back at the old nytimes describing how back at the time when I had organized coffee-house poetry readings where there had previously  been none, a couple of my fellow poets, one white, and one black were interested in hosting Dickey more privately.

Although the Bobbsey twins as we called them because of the closeness of their relationship, a mutual admiration society of two, knew that James Dickey was prominently known to be gay, they decided to share him with a couple of us who wrote from a woman's point of view and I suspect that we might somehow  beard the issue for them.

It was a most atmospheric evening, our hosting poet was locally known as the attendent in the office of a cemetery, the person to whom you go for directions when you are trying to locate a grave. I guess it did give him on the job time for writing, and although we went out every night disco-ing, he was a stickler for being punctually on time for work.   He was such a phantom, showing up under red light in the disco,  that he even lived under ground in a most unusual basement apartment; the building belonged to his grandmother.  (Another female friend of ours spent so much time there waking up late in the morning, she really partied,that the grandmother quizzed her thoroughly suspecting this was "the One". Jewish grandmothers are like that)

But thanks to grandma, a very private reception for a poet took place in what was the air-shaft of the building, a somewhat silo-like space,the "twins" had thoroughly swept and cleaned, open to the sky several stories above, in which the five of us sat by candle-light reading our work.    I would guess that this took place sometime shortly after he won the National Book Award for Poetry in 1966, for his, Buckdancer's Choice.    http://eric.stamey.com/dickey.html    Incidentally, he was the sheriff in -- Deliverance.    Born in Georgia, died in South Carolina     
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harrie
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« Reply #2759 on: December 07, 2007, 01:44:10 PM »

madupont, you aren't by any chance privy to Dickey's feelings on tartar sauce, are you?   

Great story; I love the image of the poetry-writing, disco-dancing cemetery guy.
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