Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 52794 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #2760 on: December 07, 2007, 05:48:18 PM »

Played football for Clemson, yeah, I'm familiar with the idea that, while Dickey is know popularly as the author of the novel (not story as in movie credit) "Deliverance," his literary legacy rests in his poetry.  I had never heard that he was thought to be homosexual, that's a new one on me, but as a South Carolinian, Dickey's drunken exploits and readings are local literary folklore.  I know that he has a daughter and lived with a woman in Columbia, SC, for something like the last 20 yrs. of his life.  I disagree with your assertion that the Coens were interested in the Dickey novel because of "Deliverance," but more because they know who he is and hadn't written a novel since then or maybe one or two, something I've been told to read called "Anilam" (sp?) I think preceded "Deliverance," but I don't think "To the White Sea" was a hot literary property and was thought to be nearly unfilmable, and that idea, that it was unfilmable and had little, almost no, dialogue whatsoever was what attracted them to the novel.  So I think it was more about the challenge than anything else, and I was only suggesting that that might've gotten them to a place as filmmakers thinking of how to use music in the place of dialogue, and that they might've incorporated that idea into NCFOM.  He does a good job acting at the end of "Deliverance" as the ominous sheriff who just lets what he knows go, and he looks like a Ga. sheriff at that time of his life.
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madupont
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« Reply #2761 on: December 07, 2007, 11:59:28 PM »

jbottle,

"So I think it was more about the challenge than anything else, and I was only suggesting that that might've gotten them to a place as filmmakers thinking of how to use music in the place of dialogue, and that they might've incorporated that idea into NCFOM." 

You know what, I just got back from NCFOM and everytime we got to one of the come-on scenes I'd already seen in the promo-trailer, I missed the dang clip-clop music!

I also really think this is a new break-through in Coen films. But let's finish the Dickey happenstance first.  He also has two sons, several marriages, etc., but  "drunken exploits and readings" are not merely local folklore. The poetry circuit(upon circuit, cross-wires, et al.) is so full of internecine legend by now, I mean it is after all taught in colleges to the unsuspecting students, it is the subtext of what ever other texts they happen to be reading and the professor or visiting professor is explicating to the best of his ability. Which means that by and by, you get the low-down through all the grapevine of the international community of poets. Everybody really knows everybody who slept with everybody, there are no secrets. Try for 500 years of Western Literature...
However, I'll admit that the amateur litartie(the other side of the recognized literati),condemned to a special ring  in hell of their own making, while never receiving five Our Fathers and four Hail Mary's and a good act of Contrition as their Penance from Dante Alighieri personally, will have to acquaint themselves with the two or three hundred earlier years of poetics by their Eminences the Serene and the Sublime before they are allowed into the company of the inner circles with either their instrument of music or  instrument of writing because they bring us down.

It's no secret that with the constant traveling on the road, the meeting and greeting at colleges or hermetic hermitages world wide, there is an oral history at work. Someone has to record it

And let's get on with comparing Ga. sheriffs with Tx.sheriffs like Sheriff Ed Tom Bell.
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madupont
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« Reply #2762 on: December 08, 2007, 12:01:29 AM »

Harrie, I don't believe that I ever heard  him mention tartar sauce. What's the story?
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harrie
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« Reply #2763 on: December 08, 2007, 04:40:54 AM »

madupont, just a sort of joke based on a story I heard, but to which I cannot do justice.  My apologies for bringing it up.
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madupont
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« Reply #2764 on: December 08, 2007, 11:51:13 AM »

Listen Up!  Microsoft has just discovered what a friend phoned to tell me their Computer Tech  has put up bulletins throughout their workplace that a New Virus gets into your e-mail and then sends you an e-mail which tells you that A FAMILY MEMBER IS TRYING TO CONTACT YOU

DO NOT OPEN.  IT WILL TURN OFF YOUR COMPUTER. WHEN YOU START YOUR COMPUTER AGAIN, IT WILL DESTROY YOUR HARD DRIVE
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #2765 on: December 08, 2007, 11:59:46 AM »

You know the Industry would screw "To the White Sea" up bigtime, with a ton of voiceover to replace the lack of dialog. 

I'm wondering if Josh Brolin is the next Kurt Russell, given his rugged good looks and his ability to do the minimal speaking lines thing.
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
BorisBartenov
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« Reply #2766 on: December 08, 2007, 12:00:32 PM »

What  film combines elements of Pleasantville, "Lassie," and Night of the Living Dead while exploring some of the issues raised by the keeping of zombies as household pets and/or servants under the control of an electronic obedience collar, while being the funniest film of 2007?

I suggest the answer is "Fido" and that you should rent it immediately.

I don't think any kind of review or synopsis could really do justice to this film and its fine ensemble cast -- Tim Blake Nelson, Carrie-Anne Moss, Dylan Baker,  and Billy Connolly (who plays Fido).  Filmed in "beautiful British Columbia" -- a redundant phrase if ever there was one.  With a fifties motif and soundtrack that would make David Lynch cream his jeans.

Peeing in my pants, tears running down my cheeks...for some, "Fido" is best viewed above plastic sheeting.

Please rent this ASAP.
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2767 on: December 08, 2007, 12:10:05 PM »

I read a little about "Fido" and will give it a look.

As to tartar sauce, legend has it that someone was having lunch with Dickey one day in a restaurant and he ate a bowl of tartar sauce thinking it was clam chowder.   We really explored it in-depth or whatever back in the NYTFF - it may have even been a "specialty forum discussion" or something. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2768 on: December 08, 2007, 12:43:48 PM »

Yeah, and there's the time he was at a reading and stopped or quit and turned drunkenly at the most comely undergraduate female and said:  "WHAAAAAT ISSSSS LIIIFFFFFE??."

Finding him under a mattress at the Holiday Inn, so what, we've all done that, but being in the midst of this large man, and like, 19, if it's true, must've been horrifying.

I went to see Michael Chabon do a reading of one of his short stories, and dude was like 29, maybe, I thought, okay, he is this funny and good looking and smart, maybe he's going places.  Then he did the novel that turned out to star Michael Douglas instead of Bill Pullman, but anyway, I'm sure the poetry circuit has some wild stories to tell.

I've heard Dickey described as one of the "lesser beats," but I always thought that his voice was primarily Southern and post-WWII, more than anything esle, and felt that he just lived at the same time as the "beat-poets" and happened to also disregard a lot of formal poetic rules; more like "everybody else was doing it" than identifying with everybody else.

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madupont
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« Reply #2769 on: December 08, 2007, 01:34:26 PM »

oilcanboyd23   SPOILERS IN HERE for those yet to see NCfOM

Ah! there you are.   You were right, I was wrong. It was like something miraculous happened as a consequence of finding the on-camera interviews of Bardem replying from the point of view of an actor. That did It!

When I saw the film, No Country for Old Men, last night. Bardem carried no further terror for me. I could just get into everybody else's acting as well as all the other scenes where he keeps on being the latest monster.

As I suggested before, what I particularly liked about the Coen Brothers approach to this project was their  doing something so obvious as changing Time relative to Plot. With the sequence altered, you know right from the start that Sheriff Bell has captured Anton Chigurh (except, of course you don't know that if you have read nothing about the film or seen any publicity whatsoever. So it makes for everybody being happy all round.)  In no way does it change the fact that he kills one cast member after the other down the story line.  

Particularly, the thoroughness of the character's professionalism which so hides his complete evil could not be better demonstrated than in the scene where he composes the ultimate distraction so he can gain access to a Pharmacy and then you watch as he methodically knows exactly what to do to take care of himself, better than Health Insurance, he has it completely covered when it comes to removing  a bullet.

There are lots of "little things" about this movie that makes it superb Coens.  As a woman, let me mention two for starters. Tess Harper's relationship to Sheriff Bell, as his wife.  Over the years, Tommy Lee Jones has really learned how to make his characters interesting in relation to women. Of course, you could give the credit to the Coens in how they precisely write dialog but I also know it is in Jone's finesse in the delivery of the lines to round out his own character with more depth of interior personality by bouncing it off a woman. Thus what starts as the mere defining of their relationship to his professional skill, as he loads up a  horse carrier and goes off to work, leads eventually to the scene that says everything about what he realizes in self-knowledge that he has come to the end of his  duties to society.

The second interaction is with his secretary and how they interact. I found it hilarious when last night I ran through the cast and discovered that the woman in his office who understands his demands - looks like this:      http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0350337

I also give kudos to the woman we have heard so much about over the telephone, Beth Grant, as Carla Jean Moss' mother, who gives you the other side  quickly,neat, and emphatic. This is no country for old women, either.  Carla Jean is, of course, played with that utter confusion of what is a woman to do, outside the bedroom.

There is a wonderful amount of exact and accurate casting in this movie, proving that this is a Coen Bros forte. It can be seen and heard in all the minor characters as well as that very healthy certitude of Woody Harrelson back on the big screen at his best(never once did it escape my mind that he is here knowing the action in reality. He's lived with it).

Thomas Kopache who displays the professionalism of the ultimate sales clerk outfitting Moss in mens' clothing.

Mathew Greer, the driver who picks up the hitchhiking Moss, with his matter of fact yet clear-sighted warning authoritively delivered.

Ellis, played by a bearded Barry Corbin, of whom Sheriff Bell asks, "When did you make this pot?".  It's a well-played scene by both of them; believe it or not, I had a widow-woman neighbor incapacitated and confined by her body in just the same way, a situation perfectly captured in a scene which begins the roll-down in a sequence of scenes where the Sheriff has begun to admit to  himself his retirement has approached and that it is No Country for Old Men.
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madupont
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« Reply #2770 on: December 08, 2007, 01:42:30 PM »

You are right,jbottle. Dickey is primarily a Southern writer whose time coincided, but they all knew who he was because in one sense he broke the mold of the Approved Southern writer as a Type for which they had to give him credit.  There couldn't be a finer "Southern Writer" than one who writes the underlying descriptive scenario which we see on screen of the poverty-stricken, genetically-challenged children of the South picking music. It is a fleeting scene that stays with you forever, just as much as the infamous rape or the hand of the man's arm going under the water.
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madupont
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« Reply #2771 on: December 08, 2007, 01:48:27 PM »

Ps, I also knew a psychology professor who always asked that question as he casually turned toward you from his bar-stool at Tomasello's (last stop of the evening as bar-closing rolled across the city) but Harry phrased it just a little differently, in a very serious tone with a smile on his face,"What is life all about?" 

I think that kind of gets you, off guard when you are less than thirty. You don't expect him to repeat that one-liner again, on the next occasion you run into him there, and the next and the next. Meanwhile, by day, he very effectively teaches psychology at the nearest state university branch campus in small city Midwest.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2772 on: December 08, 2007, 02:02:11 PM »

oilcanboyd23   SPOILERS IN HERE for those yet to see NCfOM

With the sequence altered, you know right from the start that Sheriff Bell has captured Anton Chigurh

"No Country For Old Men" *** SPOILER ***

Hmm... I didn't get that impression.  What makes you think Bell captured Chigurh?

There's a scene in the beginning in which Chigurh gets arrested (while Bell narrates about the criminal world generally) by a young deputy whom he later chokes with his handcuffs.  Maybe you're thinking that was Bell? 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2773 on: December 08, 2007, 06:06:11 PM »

"You are right,jbottle."

Every so often, but yeah, "what is life?" is what you wen to college supposedly to find out while life happens, but regardless, thanks for your comments on Dickey, and I wish I had his patience with the typewriter.  I think as far as "New Year's Resolution's" are concered, maybe I will put "Anilam" in there along with the other things that are hard to do like have three beers.
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madupont
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« Reply #2774 on: December 09, 2007, 01:29:36 PM »

]
oilcanboyd23   SPOILERS IN HERE for those yet to see NCfOM

With the sequence altered, you know right from the start that Sheriff Bell has captured Anton Chigurh

"No Country For Old Men" *** SPOILER ***

Hmm... I didn't get that impression.  What makes you think Bell captured Chigurh?

There's a scene in the beginning in which Chigurh gets arrested (while Bell narrates about the criminal world generally) by a young deputy whom he later chokes with his handcuffs.  Maybe you're thinking that was Bell? 


http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/348834/No-Country-for-Old-Men/trailers

I realize you have a problem with this because I checked the trailers at several places and they are all cut differently. They have edited several versions. I'm still looking for the original with the clip-clop music as I mentioned.  But you may be right, about the difference of what you and I both thought we saw at the begining of the film.  Be sure and take a look at the clip to the left that has Chigurh's image,since they post two side by side, although one will follow the other, a the nytimes site.

I'm now off to the "Official" site, if it is still around because it was in large scale.  At any rate, Miramax says this morning that NCfOM is their vote for Best Picture at the Oscar.  I kind of agree because I can't recall anything else that I've seen that was near to it. Neither Eastern Promises nor American Gangster and that's about it.  I do have to catch up this afternoon with something that I missed over at Channel One on Demand and then can better gauge what ought to win Oscar. I gave up ever since they mucked up with Brokeback Mountain just to let us know how much they had sold out to Washington,D.C.
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