Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 34014 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2775 on: December 09, 2007, 01:48:56 PM »

Be sure and take a look at the clip to the left that has Chigurh's image,since they post two side by side, although one will follow the other, a the nytimes site.

Thanks for the link.   In that clip/preview/whatever, they show a shot of Tommy Lee Jones in a cop car, and the next thing they show is a handcuffed Chigurh being escorted into a cop car by a cop, who is not Tommy Lee Jones.
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madupont
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« Reply #2776 on: December 09, 2007, 02:34:22 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HD2p85Ti7q4&feature=related

I like this one, as review, and this quote,"tommy Lee Jones monologue at the end was brilliant, and puts the whole theme of the film into perspective"; both of which I pretty much more than agree with --although, now I've got to read the book, don't I. This film is the perfect example of what I was talking about that more books are read after seeing a film (in order to answer existential questions about real life and the aesthetics of depicting it relevantly) than vice-versa films gone to following discussions of popular books.  As you probably have noticed, I do not find the literary coverage of either fiction or non-fiction adequately covered in forums at present where books come out rather amateurishly waved around for attention rather than discussed as writing.

This I think is probably caused by the disinclination to waver(or, waiver) from what people think that they were doing at the nytimes.com Book discussions before they were taken over by egopaths with no claim to pertinent knowledge of what they were discussing by take over. The waivering are responsible by allowing  that  format here; maybe it is just laziness as much as fear of the bigger menace.  Previous to that we had the input of people who had some professional experience such as "teddy"from Vancouver who still writes and attends conferences to submit her papers for discussion. Which reminds me that's the film that I want to see this afternoon, written by Alice Munro, Away from Her.

We even had a couple of male old-timers, one from the West Coast, who have no idea where we are nor are we able to contact them. I now and then wonder if they ever fired the editor of their on-line mishagas? I also miss our veterans who knew their literature as well; I mean they actually were Veterans, called up to serve because of Iraq. One of them used to drop in at the Film forum before he left; he'd just come to his retirement, would have come state-side from Germany. No way he could have remained there when they called off retirements.
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madupont
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« Reply #2777 on: December 09, 2007, 05:01:49 PM »

This Week's Variety Column, June 13, 2007
Scott Rudin drove 'No Country'
Several of this season's award contenders only came into existence because producers willed them into being. Each envisioned a movie from an unlikely literary source, and never stopped pushing, needling and maneuvering to get the films made. Nobody does that better than New York-based theater and film impresario Scott Rudin.


Response --

"I love it! You're sucked into that world immediately"

"Looks stellar. Wonder if they changed the ending. That book was as bleak as 40 miles of open desert."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://movies.ign.com/articles/835/835569p2.html  Garret Dillahunt

http://movies.ign.com/articles/834/834067p1.html   Todd Gilchrist

"as few and far between as the anachronisms like No Country that harken back to the days when cinema was believed to be primarily art, not commerce.

[There is a high-resolution video in this column]
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madupont
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« Reply #2778 on: December 11, 2007, 02:28:26 AM »

Okay, so I did watch, Away from Her.  It is truly depressing. Whereas the story was ingenious. Well, at least I got to see Julie Christie again, so life is not all bad. A check up against a little realism does you a world of good. But the inevitability of being here too long is a downer; and you don't even know that you have been.  It's a mistake made by all  young folk who are convinced exercise and reasonable medical procedures at the appropriate intervals do the trick that will allow you to stay young. Oh, really, as Olympia Dukakis would say.

I happened to have noticed that Olympia is getting a whole lot down right sexier the older she gets.  It's been coming on her. She was an average matronly "older lady", very much a lady about it. It, being older. When she was Cher's mother in, Moonstruck.   But, no more, those days are past.

She scared me half out of my wits when I saw her in a film with Janet McTeer in the jungle of some tropical Southern hemispheric region. When push comes to shove, Olympia will not only induce Janet McTeer to see reason about sexual matters when one is in danger of losing one's life; but, give her an elderly,incapacitated  husband whom Julie Christie sympathizes toward, at a center for those who are losing their independent faculties, and Olympia will take the opportunity to give Julie's husband (actually Fiona Anderson's, in character, whose husband is a professorial type who nearly never cracks a smile in this film)one last chance for an extramarital affair whether he likes it or not.

As I told Teddy, when I first read, The Bear Came Over the Mountain, it was the most adept thing I'd yet read by Alice Munro. Very satisfying piece of literature. Teddy had of course just seen the film. I think she duly noted the shortcomings of the film "art", some over six months ago; but nothing prepared me for this assault on one's inevitably succumbing to reality.  It is by far the most depressing movie that I've ever seen.  Depending on your age, you will hate it.  If you don't find age much of a bother at all, as yet, you will just find it boring. Suit yourself.
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barton
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« Reply #2779 on: December 11, 2007, 12:10:30 PM »

Away From Her is in my queue. 

"I happened to have noticed that Olympia is getting a whole lot down right sexier the older she gets.  It's been coming on her."

That "It" is a naughty fellow.



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jbottle
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« Reply #2780 on: December 11, 2007, 04:43:48 PM »

Oil & barton:  I think we are all knocking on the door of "Superhero Member," but I'm a little closer because of my "CUTACHEK*" asterisk blasts.  Ramp up the rhetoric gents and I'll see you on the other side in that rare air up there like Kevin Bacon.
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harrie
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« Reply #2781 on: December 11, 2007, 08:25:57 PM »

Congratulations in advance, gentlemen.

I didn't want to interrupt the NCfOM discussion, but I did want to confess: I watched another bad movie.  The whole thing. I don't know why, I just couldn't stop myself.  I knew exactly where the remote was, I didn't have to wrestle anyone for it, yet there I stayed on whatever STARZ channel it was that featured Catch and Release.

Jennifer Garner was better than I thought she'd be.  Timothy Olyphant was worse than I thought he'd be.  He also abuses the scary eye technique that did pretty well for Seth Bullock but kind of has no place in this flick.  Kevin Smith was....well, Kevin Smith, but he was really, really good at it. (I like him for some reason, though I know a lot of people don't.)  Some other guy named Sam Jaeger was pretty good.  Juliette Lewis, though I think she's kind of a freak in life and in the parts she plays, does her thing adequately.

**POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD, IF YOU CAN CONSIDER A MOVIE THIS BAD SPOILABLE**
Catch and Release, however, is badly written; the story is full of holes and cliches. Boy fiance dies before the wedding.  Girl fiancee finds out the dead guy had lots of secrets, including an illegitimate child. There's tears, bad drunk scenes, more tears, a Peter Brady "if you were my fiancee, I'd -- I'd --" moment, more tears, and eventually a peaceful reconciliation and resolution.  But getting there is hell, I tell you. 

Plus, two major gripes -- Juliette Lewis as the stereotypically spacy LA-based massage therapist other woman practices a healthful, holistic lifestyle complete with chakras and cleansing diets.  Then she feeds the little bastard -- well, he is one -- a Happy Meal.  I get the irony, the joke if you can call it that, but the viewer is so beaten over the head with it, how could anyone miss it?  Also, Timothy Olyphant's character starts the flick out banging anything in sight, then falls in love with JG, then hears her tell someone else she doesn't love him (TO, that is), so he goes back to his house.  On the beach. In Malibu.  And at the end, when JG follows her heart of whatever and goes to that house, TO's out on the beach by himself, playing with the dog.  A cute dog, though.  But I really think 1) he wouldn't be alone, all mooning over JG; and 2) he might even be organizing a topless volleyball game or something, where the winning team gets .... him.  Plus, who was watching the dog while TO was wooing JG for a couple weeks (it seemed like)?

On the plus side, some absolutely stunning scenery.  Colorado?  British Columbia?  I don't know, but I want to go there.  One particular scene, I pretty much tried to watch the background and ignore the characters in the foreground.  It was worth the effort.

Also, the music -- some of it was really good. Some of it was really bad.  But it was used like a weapon in the flick.  The way the music was done reminded me of when in high school, certain kids -- not me, certainly! -- would drive around with the top down and the thematically correct, very cool tune (or tunes) of the moment blasting away.  It was just too much like "Okay, here we play _____" and the viewer is just assaulted with message music.   Like when this girl I know -- and I'm really neither of the participants in this scenario, was just a witness -- saw a guy she really liked but he didn't like her that much and he showed up with a neck full of hickeys. So the girl flips to Pat Benatar's "Hit Me With Your Best  Shot" on the car's tape deck.  And it's one of those laughably bad moments that callous people like me still laugh my ass off over.  (I've got a really good one for "On My Own" too.) 

So I guess the bottom line is:  watch Catch and Release if you dare.  But don't forget your bag of chips, pint of ice cream or whatever your poison may be.  And if anyone really and truly loved this movie and I've hurt your feelings, I apologize; but I really and truly dislike this flick.
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madupont
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« Reply #2782 on: December 12, 2007, 01:10:00 AM »


Away From Her is in my queue. 

"I happened to have noticed that Olympia is getting a whole lot down right sexier the older she gets.  It's been coming on her."

That "It" is a naughty fellow.

[/quote]



Freudian slip that. Couldn't have planned it better.  And, yes, he was a naughty fellow; the husband of Julie Christie's character Fiona Anderson. In other words, he was just good old Prof.Anderson who teaches early Saga and Icelandic literature, throw in a little Knut Hamsun on the side, maybe The Master Builder....
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madupont
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« Reply #2783 on: December 12, 2007, 03:57:05 AM »

ASSOCIATION OF MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION PRODUCERS J. Nicholas Counter III

J. Nicholas Counter III, President of the Association of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). The AMPTP represents the six major media conglomerates in contract negotiations with the Writer’s Guild of America.

Led by J. Nicholas Counter III, the AMPTP had over three months to respond to important proposals the Writer’s Guild had put on the table, which addressed issues unprecedented in previous negotiations, including Internet reuse and original writing for new media.

J. Nicholas Counter III deserves the Grinch of the Year Award because:

He forced 12,000 members out on strike, putting tens of thousands of people out of work just before Christmas.
Oddly, he can’t count. He says the writers can’t get a share of the hundreds of millions of dollars the conglomerates are making over the Internet because they can’t count the money coming in. (Apparently, it’s coming in way too fast!)
The WGA’s proposal would cost the media conglomerates $151 million dollars over three years. The strike is costing Los Angeles alone an estimated $21.3 million dollars a day* – and writers have been on strike since November 5th, 2007.
He’s ruining Christmas for tens of thousands by keeping them out of work.

*According to FilmL.A., the nonprofit group that handles film permits and promotes the industry.

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barton
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« Reply #2784 on: December 12, 2007, 12:53:24 PM »

Harrie, if a movie is good, I don't need food with it.  "Catch and Release" sounded like a turkey a mile away, my condolences for your ordeal. 

"Disturbia" is next in my queue, will report back on that.  I don't know why I gravitate to films that are dark or horrific in the winter, but it seems to be the trend...maybe it's the old theory that watching bad things happen on screen makes you feel more sunny about your actual life.


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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2785 on: December 12, 2007, 02:48:38 PM »

"Disturbia" is next in my queue, will report back on that. 

I found it to be extreme dulls-ville, except for the performance of David Morse, who is a credit to the fraternity of so-called "character actors."
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barton
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« Reply #2786 on: December 12, 2007, 02:56:34 PM »

Word, re Morse.  He rarely is anything less than excellent.  He even had his own tv show for about a season, called "Hack" in which he played a fired cop who drove a taxi -- it wasn't bad and he really fleshed out his character as a decent guy with kind of a temper and some moral ambiguity about how to get justice done.



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madupont
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« Reply #2787 on: December 12, 2007, 04:28:13 PM »

Quick, Sundance Channel retrospective.

Fri Dec 14 5:00 PM MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI TRIPLE FEATURE
 Celebrate Italian modernist Michelangelo Antonioni with a triple-feature of some of his most well-known films, starting with L'AVVENTURA at 5PM, then continuing with THE PASSENGER and L'ECLISSE.
 

http://www.sundancechannel.com/videos/230260434  Video of The Passenger (Jack Nicholson and Maria Schneider)


Meanwhile, tonight, several people have been talking World History early Tudors so here is your chance at 8:30pm for Mary,Queen of Scots (who is, of course, Vanessa Redgrave, opposite Queen Elizabeth I
(Glenda Jackson). This was a real snappy version; that's Glenda Jackson's forte.
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harrie
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« Reply #2788 on: December 12, 2007, 05:34:57 PM »

Harrie, if a movie is good, I don't need food with it.  "Catch and Release" sounded like a turkey a mile away, my condolences for your ordeal. 

Barton, that was just a chick flick joke, ie an FBI-like warning "Proper viewing of this film requires a pint of ice cream and box of Kleenex."  Unless of course you're me and you just pick apart the film without changing the channel.  Totally my bad for watching.

Madupont, thanks for the Mary Queen of Scots heads up.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2789 on: December 12, 2007, 05:39:14 PM »

He even had his own tv show for about a season, called "Hack" in which he played a fired cop who drove a taxi --

I thought that was a reality show about my golf game.
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