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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 52561 times)
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harrie
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« Reply #2805 on: December 13, 2007, 06:57:45 PM »

And I've heard good things about the Turturro flick as well, though I have not seen it.
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madupont
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« Reply #2806 on: December 13, 2007, 08:25:08 PM »


Speaking of Anna Faris, she'd be great in a Sally Field bio-pic.  Is Sally Field iconic (or whatever) enough for a bio-pic? 


Excuse me, but is Anna Faris old enough to have been the wife to Jake Gyllenhaal.(in Brokeback Mt.) I have my reasons for asking; it's a Baltimore thing.

On that second matter: re:Sally Field  iconic enough? Her bio-pic is actually Brothers and Sisters or vice-versa if you read me, the only person missing we didn't discuss the other day, if you are looking for the dead husband candidate why just fill in Burt Reynolds. In that order, first comes Dinah Shore, then Sally, then the ditzy blond bombshell spendthrift.... you know the scenario.
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madupont
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« Reply #2807 on: December 13, 2007, 08:38:35 PM »


What interesting suggestions. I usually like the dead guys - #1 will always be Claude Rains.  There's a bunch of living actors who I'll watch do just about anything -- the aforementioned Bill Pullman, Jeff Bridges, Ed Norton, Jeff Daniels, Paul Rudd, and John C. Reilly for example.  But I guess the equation would have to be completed thusly: as Harrie is to Gabriel Byrne. 

(Besides, Ruffalo is hands-off; he's already been spoken for.)




You're darn tootin'.  I spoke for him but didn't get a response.

I suppose you've see Ed be The Magician?   Did not like his The Painted Veil  not to be confused with Love in the Time of Cholera.  What's his name stole that one:Liev Schreiber. Although this is the film where I learned to love
Naomi Watts. For dealing with him.  It was the meanness of Norton that I totaled in the minus column. His performance in the schmaltzy TM won my heart over to a corny movie with some lovely occult illusionist effects.
 
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jbottle
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« Reply #2808 on: December 13, 2007, 09:00:30 PM »

I don't think Faris looks like Field...anyway Maude, what star do you want to holdslashscru or whatever?
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madupont
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« Reply #2809 on: December 13, 2007, 09:01:05 PM »

Ps.

Now, if you'd said dead guys like Marlon Brando, John Garfield,Tyrone Power,James Dean, even Jeffrey Hunter(whom I always thought was the father of Drew Barrymore! Who was that other guy anyway?).
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jbottle
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« Reply #2810 on: December 13, 2007, 09:04:55 PM »

Ouch, I meant hold/scru as a joke, and that came across really BTK, sorry everyone.  Rude maybe funny, rude serial killer on the internet, uh, not so much, and realise I could've deleted but I thought it was *funny* in a "are you sure you don't need to talk to somebody??" way.  The restraining order against Ms. Winger was lifted on May 23, 2002.  My effort to re-enlist into her fan club under the alias "officer_gentleman23" was poorly recieved and I was cautioned by my attorney not to send no more e-mails nor letters neither.  And that was the last of it, I swear.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2811 on: December 13, 2007, 09:50:26 PM »

On that second matter: re:Sally Field  iconic enough? Her bio-pic is actually Brothers and Sisters or vice-versa if you read me, the only person missing we didn't discuss the other day, if you are looking for the dead husband candidate why just fill in Burt Reynolds. In that order, first comes Dinah Shore, then Sally, then the ditzy blond bombshell spendthrift.... you know the scenario.

Great point.  Maybe I'm thinking of Anna Faris for a "Smokey And The Bandit" remake.  Maybe Ruffalo drives the car, put Dwight Yoakam in the truck, Johnny Knoxville as Junior and BTJ would have to be somebody great.  Andy Griffith?  Fred Gwynne would have knocked it out of the park.   
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madupont
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« Reply #2812 on: December 13, 2007, 09:57:18 PM »

jbottle -- What can I say, I carefully skirted that one while running over in my mind equivalent "dead guys" and then realized it was too laughable for several reasons. Most of the Dead Actors, are nameless, and I recognize them on the screen as people who were fascinating when I was a kid but whose names are lost to posterity with a few exceptions who never struck me as screwing material. The style was so different back then.

For instance, going to "moving pictures" did not entrance me toward Charlie Chaplin but now Ben Chaplin has a certain quality like John Garfield or Mark Ruffalo, then and now comparisons. I accompanied my father to spur of the moment pictures as well, which was a real treat, we might be on the way to drop me off at his mother's, my gram Sue, and he would notice a picture playing, on a marquee in some podunk small town, that we had to stop and see.  He was a real movie buff.

As a result, I thought Nigel Bruce was a lot of fun. This was ruined for me when I saw him perform, if not with all three Barrymores,what may have been one of those horror films we discussed around Halloween and which indicated to me I had him typecast in my mind as Dr.Watson and although I'd seen him in other roles simply did not recognize him.

By the time that I could go to movies on my own, although he was truly impressive in: Sign of the Cross, Frederick March is not exactly a style you expect to enjoy any sexual activity with whatsoever.  How about Spencer Tracy? Only Kate Hepburn could make that mistake(but after seeing her imitated in The Aviator, I can see why).

The embarrassing truth nowadays compared to that era came up when The Movie Club was putting me on and asked in general the identities on a couple of pet names in the Lavender League which I immediately recognized as my favourite Mr. Belvedere* and the villain of all sophistication George Sanders (who was actually married to and divorced by two Gabor sisters) was an international type by birth, had some very flip ideas about film-acting that are rather "oscar wildean" as bon mots, but naturally enough, for one suffering from such ennui,  he committed suicide much like a woman would. I ask you, five bottles of Nembutal?  I think Clifton Webb* was before your time but he was sharp with  Gene Tierney, when he played Waldo Lydecker, in Laura.

As Harri knows when it isn't dead guys at the movies it is those getting close, and she knows I adore Paul Newman.  Now I never much liked him until...he became "Old".  Living his given him the corrective to what he was as a brash young movie star. I realized why, very particularly when they recently did one of those Making of programs but back in the day when this impossible director did Butch Cassady and the Sundance Kid.  Looking at that footage, I could see why I absolutely loathed Paul Newman.  As a young man, he was definitely not my type; I would consider his type as having been ugly at that point in his life; while the older he became, the better looking he was. Now, he is just perfect. Funny I don't feel that way about Clint Eastwood?  Newman started getting good about the late 1960s, when we used to sneak into the races just hoping to run into him "by accident" if you'll excuse the expression.

I'd sit in a caravan and read Tarot cards on Memorial Day Indies but never once did Paul show up as a customer. (I became still fonder of him because I think that the first big cast production that I played was Thornton Wilder's, Our Town)

What did you expect me to say? Peter Weller?     But, say, I did have a crush on  Peter Lorre when I was too young to know he had made M. I understood his humour. Arthur Koestler had the same sardonic wit, as did another one from the Sydney Greenstreet and Bogart casting -- I mean, those were the days when we "listened to movies" on the Lux Soap Family Theater on the radio. Morrie or Murry something,forgot the name; but, you know how it is, can you remember the names of some of the people you made it with forty or fifty years ago? No.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2813 on: December 13, 2007, 11:02:06 PM »

Yeah, I liked John Garfield a lot when I caught one of the noirs he was in where he gets knocked out and we go into a kind of abyss spiral or blackout...if I'm thinking of the right movie, he was a great underplayer in the Bogey way but with a different kind of streetfighter and not "star," read, Bogey's uneasy smiles, but yeah, he had it in spades, I'll bet it was fun when he was the stuff.  I think he had a lot of "range" from what I can remember, Bogey never fulfilling the dark heart of noir but almost an obliviousness that was equally compelling, intended or not, you get the feeling with the best of the noir actors, and I need to see DOA if that's the right one, again, or any of the Garfield noirs that should remain in the moviehead consciousness, what I remember most is that he seemed like he knew it was all going downhill and the idea is to hang on and ride to the end of the story with whatever you've got.  If my memory is correct, Garfield had a deeper connection with the audience, while Bogey had that star ability to almost want to shield you, as much as possible, from the hard truth at the center of it, a smart-ass fatalist and a guy who doesn't want to tell himself what he already knows, and you have to think that to get anything of substance across in the service and delivery of a story had to have been a guess at best as they were cranking out product in the heyday of when everybody who could, went to the movies every week, I sorta envy that experience, like, what will happen this week when good movies were being made no problem, unlike now, when it seems to be product by committee to protect an image, instead of product by get it done now as well as possible.  What, four, five takes at most, I think that kind of pressure cooker produced great films the way that no money films of the American film reniassance of the early '70's might've, and possibly briefly in the early '90's had a sort of storytelling imperative reduced to what it was that you were able to get under money and time pressure, and there was a lot of talent then, like Garfield, working under unusually difficult circumstances while now, I guess George Clooney gets to do exactly what he wants to a more precise degree, and with little or no different or possibly worse results.....I'm rambling but you get the idea that Sydney Greenstreet showed up and did it, but I think that with fewer takes you maybe had more connection with the story because you know pretty much what your character just did, where now, and this may be a misperception, there is too much management and too little preparation, and that's why you get a disconnectedness between scenes, or cut and paste to preserve a continuity that doesn't necessarily preserve the story overall, but again, I digress...
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madupont
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« Reply #2814 on: December 14, 2007, 12:27:34 AM »

I think your take is correct on Garfield, Bogey, etc.  That "was" the Garfield movie by the way! "I'll bet it was fun when he was the stuff." Apparently, that was the rumor. He was off the street. New York, if I'm not mistaken. Bogey was a rich kid, I can remember getting directions for  a nice place to live because of copy from the localpaper on the location of the home of a lady who gave him his start in pictures by picking him out to be the Gerber Baby drawn for their advertisement;  needless to say, I turned right around and went back to "my digs" as Constitution Hill,Princeton was obviously what some poster here referred to as, a "gated community.

But oddest of all was the occasion when I went to work in yet another hospital, which I'd been doing since I was quite young because I knew all the hospitals where my father had been on staff.  This one was a small community hospital owned by a neighbor of ours, way off in the country but near enough to a small town where another neighbor had moved when we were still in grade school; so,I knew the town pretty much like the back of my hand in those days, enough so to feel at home in it.  Whatever it had been in the past, it now had the cleaned up name or rather description: Something Something Hospital For Mental and Nervous Disorders.

If that sounds like right out of a B and one-half movie, absolutely, with a cast of characters that were required for that sort of script: the surgeon who had attacked his wife (but they needed him in surgery just the same because who else was there?); the very young girl who had a bad experience with marriage and suffered the equivalent of morning sickness, rather easy to diagnose but she never left her room because she was too nauseated. One disabled female, on crutches approaching with thirties designated "old maid", read all self-help books. But, by and large, there were the senile whose families in the North Shore suburbs paid prime rates for monthly rent so as not to have to deal with it. The standard elderly, but the not quite there yet did things for attention like throwing all fruit from fruit baskets out the window; an attention getting device. For this you merely spoon feed them and check to be sure that when you bring their medication that they swallow them with no tucking them under their tongue,etc. You have the elderly males who swear like troopers and expose themselves, but you still spoon feed them and cover them back up as you go. 

We did have one perfectly respectable looking woman of a certain age, well to do, an educator, which may or may not provide some insight into the strange demise of Dr. Herman Tarnower,the diet doctor, because you could often hear her screaming in the middle of the night; from nightmares.

All in all, a perfect cast, including the depressive standard electro-shock therapy of the era, for the late night Saturday movie on tv.

But the star of the show, I discovered on rounds and finding the quaint quarters for lock up, special suites with mullioned(reinforced) windows, plain floors, truly gated. I really didn't think anybody was in there. Until I saw the roster and noticed the name: Dorothy Ogden Greenstreet.

Having been such a movie fan, as I recounted tonight, I knew immediately who it was. The maiden name was a local establishment name but I'd had no idea that she was hospitalized here rather than out on the Coast. Back then, they made no gestures of politesse to hide significant details in film-bios of movie stars, so this was what I had read. In the age of Luella and Miss Hopper's radio shows and columns, there was no more privacy than today's knock-offs about Brittany Spears or Paris Hilton, or who are this week's?
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jbottle
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« Reply #2815 on: December 14, 2007, 01:54:32 AM »

I think I was thinking of Edmund O'Brian in "DOA," and maybe Garfield in "The Postman always rings twice," and maybe one or the other was in a boxing picture, research tomorrow, and then there's Alan Ladd, in a noir, maybe that's it, too, I need to get that book on noir and kind of re-up on my references, but anyway, yeah, there are a lot of forgotten performances of that era that kind of slide through, to mention the one with Robert Mitchum, "Out of the Past," great, and the lesser Bogey noir with Ida Lupino, I have a little Netflixing to do...and to remember not to see everything new when I can't remember specifically great movies that I should know by heart.
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madupont
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« Reply #2816 on: December 14, 2007, 02:21:49 AM »

It's not,'Postman' because I just ran into a surprise earlier tonight in discovering that David Mamet had done the rewrite for the remake with Kathleen Turner, now I go back to the Big Blonde from the past and I visualize and I may not get her name off the top but I get her "hairdo" and her figure, and the guy is definitely not --with typical female logic because I know that it must have been Bill from the Big Chill who now went on to bigger things.

You are right, it was originally Garfield shtupping Lana Turner. And we get Jessica Lange on the table with romantic Jack Nicholson. It is still David Mamet does James Cain. Now who the heck am I seeing if not Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck in the other Cain flick with Edward G.Robinson, Double Indemnity.
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madupont
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« Reply #2817 on: December 14, 2007, 02:42:21 AM »

Weird in the time sequence, this is Body Heat,Kathleen Turner with Willian Hurt/

Richard Crenna,Ted Danson,Mickey Rourke, unmemorable all compared to this was Neo-Noir.

You see, in so far as we have an original Forties picture with Garfield and Lana Turner, the Nicholson/Lange was played like it took place in the late Thirties to Early Forties if set in an elusive region not making gains like the rest of the economy.

Lana Turner was glamorous, Garfield was hot.  Lange was distinctly not glamorous, and Nicholson was like a wily fellow without much change of clothes not exactly looking for work.

That latter version comes out the same year as the new talents. Kasdan who kind of summers at the beach in the vicinity of  Jack's motherland the Jersey Shore, is popping out movies one after the other about contemporary life. Although he even did a western from the past, he also decides to play around with another old form and invents a film noir that returns to the original Glamour in the sticks scenario. I recall a costuming for wardrobe from truly late Forties into the bopped Fifties, with william hurt leaning into kathleen turner in his drape pants. She wears standard issue button front top to bottom short-sleeved cotton dress.  We get the message.

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harrie
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« Reply #2818 on: December 14, 2007, 03:13:41 PM »

So madupont, a while back we were talking about The Black Dahlia.  Then recently I was reading a piece on Michelle Phillips in Vanity Fair*, and it says about a woman that teenage Michelle befriended: 

Tamar Hodel was one of six children—by three different women—of the most pathologically decadent man in Los Angeles: Dr. George Hodel, the city’s venereal-disease czar and a fixture in its A-list demimonde. She’d grown up in her father’s Hollywood house, which resembled a Mayan temple, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son, and was the site of wild parties, in which Hodel was sometimes joined by director John Huston and photographer Man Ray.

George Hodel shared with Man Ray a love for the work of the Marquis de Sade and the belief that the pursuit of personal liberty was worth everything—possibly even, for Hodel, gratuitous murder. What has recently come to light, by way of two startling investigative books (2003’s Black Dahlia Avenger, by Hodel’s ex–L.A.P.D. homicide-detective son, Steve Hodel, and—building upon it—Exquisite Corpse, 2006, by art writers Mark Nelson and Sarah Hudson Bayliss), is that George Hodel was a prime suspect in the notorious Black Dahlia murder. (According to Black Dahlia Avenger, Hodel was the killer, and the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office conducted extensive surveillance of him. There were numerous arrests, but no one was ever charged with the murder.) A striking, graphic array of evidence in the two books strongly suggests that it was Hodel who, on January 15, 1947, killed actress Elizabeth Short, then surgically cut her in two and transported the halved, nude, exsanguinated corpse—the internal organs kept painstakingly intact—to a vacant lot, where he laid the pieces out as if in imitation of certain Surrealist artworks by Man Ray.


Michelle Phillips has had a pretty interesting life, so if you're interested, here's the whole thing:
http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2007/12/phillips200712

*not standard reading material for harrie, the Phillips story just caught my eye

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harrie
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« Reply #2819 on: December 14, 2007, 03:20:33 PM »

Oh! I interpreted crush as the totally emotional thing, not even going near the sex thing. To me, the whole point of a crush is that it goes unrealized, so why even go there and find out more than you probably wanted to know?  If we're talking about young Hollywood bucks who need a good debauching...well, I could organize the list alphabetically or in order of preference. 
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