Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
April 25, 2018, 04:36:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 188 189 [190] 191 192 ... 303
  Print  
Author Topic: Movies  (Read 41024 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
oilcanboyd23
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1613



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2835 on: December 15, 2007, 06:06:05 PM »

"Death To Smoochy" MUST be dealt with in MYOF.  I liked it, especially the great Michael Rispoli's hilarious turn, against-type, I suppose, as an Irish retired-boxer with the precocious disposition of an 8-year old, who is sort of the mascot/pet of a mafia family led by his mom, which somehow factors into the story, like maybe Robin Williams owes them money or something? 

Anyways, I say "check it out" to anyone who hasn't.  I'm hoping Rabes sees fit to give it a "Secret Success" rating.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2007, 06:10:36 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2836 on: December 15, 2007, 06:57:07 PM »

Harrie, you are right,"The Illusionist"!  It wasn't that I was thinking of Max Von Sydow, in the Bergman film but The Magician actually has a bit of the premise lifted right into Norton's role as The Illusionist, in that the police and some of the local important want to disprove both Von Sydow's and Norton's ability to deal with the occult.

I loved Ed Norton's ability to make you believe; and he was an entirely different Ed Norton from the truly impressive change he worked for American History X. He had me convinced. Not at all much different than the guy who wanted me to pierce his ears for him so he could wear a nice Ritterkreuze in each ear.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2837 on: December 16, 2007, 02:21:09 AM »

Okay, now for new movies.  I just saw the reviews for Sweeney Todd. I don't know if this movie is for me but there was one upper;Borat/Baron Cohen, whichever of his names you like best, has a scene for the shaving contest(which barber can complete the job the most quickly)when Johnny Depp has returned from Australia. Our Sasha Baron Cohen is costumed replete with rolled curled wig  to go with his moustache, and a suit lovely blue Louis whichever,no, come to think of it, may be a bit like Reynold's Blue Boy.

However, I will thrash around and see what happened to the new Esquire Magazine with Johnny Depp on the cover, stoned, I think, unless that is just what getting old looks like on a tired day. Possibly some of both. He's entitled. Perhaps perusing this will convince me it is alright to go sit through this which is being much praised for being downsized. Big problem: Helena Bonham Carter. Why? Well, she looks just like she did is several other films, particularly Frankenstein's Bride for starters, perhaps not that extreme but these weird make-up designs are not her best way to go. Come to think of it, not Depp's best way to go either; for surely,nobody is going to bring their children to see this performance(unless they want real trouble around the next corner). Or, is the philosophy on these costumed maquillage antics that if they look absurd enough, you won't take it seriously that they are committing murder and gruesome pick up suppers.  I mean this could seriously put me off from steak and kidney pie ever again; come to think of it, maybe I had my last one so long ago that I can't remember how I could ever because of all we've learned in the last eight years.
                                         
                                             *    *    *

Now, what I really want to see, and Barton will laugh grotesquely, is --
Youth Without Youth     starring Tim Roth, Bruno Ganz, because dear Barton -- I collect this stuff. I have 12 pages of listings today on the Bollingen series of C.G.Jung and it is cracking me up, how the secret little motivations of human conduct manage to squeak through the veneer when it comes to books that they want to steal to discover a secret desperately enough that they will filch one from a colleague's collected series; or, perhaps their host just gloriously presented the right to own that particular volume being lovingly caressed by his beloved, absolutely uncaring, at the moment, that he was breaking up a 20 volume set.

Well, it is neater than lifting concepts of a fellow poster and blatantly presenting them as your own in not one but half a dozen forums to somehow prove that you are the most talented being ever existed, and then screaming crazily about never writing hate speech and expecting kudos of praise to meander one's way. I mean, which is worse? The clandestine seeking of secret knowledge or the covetous acquisition of a token that one is wanted; or is it the thoughtless seductiveness of forgetting one's self-interest.

Believe me,it was enough to discover that Martin Scorsese hates this film!

"I was so excited to discover, in this tale by Eliade, the key themes that I most hope to understand better: time, consciousness and the dream-like basis of reality. For me, it is indeed a return to the ambitions I had for work in cinema as a student." - Francis Ford Coppola


Here's hoping that the Eliade, he has just mentioned, is the one I had in mind. Mircea Eliade, the Romanian savant, who would have played Warren Beatty, had he been the movie star instead of vice-versa. They might have done Iconoclasts Together.

Is Scorsese getting fidgety in his elder years, fussy, long fingered like a Pope of Vatican on the Pacific desiring infallibility. Or, is he just in an uproar of saber-rattling like a height-challenged imperious Chinese who came to rule for a few short years toward the end of the 20th.century.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2838 on: December 16, 2007, 02:31:47 AM »

Oil, agreed on DTS, it's a no-brainer high-concept commercial failure, but here's the thing, not destined to gain a sleeper crowd, I mean, it's actually a funny movie on it's own terms, like three stars, but it was canned, had a bad rollout and was overall reduced to a failure, which is not what it was.

I agree with "Secret Success," but then, there didn't seem to be much in the balance with the release, like, maybe you're ritght, and they weren't trying to sneak a fartout during a wake.  But maybe, they were, and didn't spend the dough they should have to sell it.

"Down in the Valley" is too long, but it has David Morse, Norton, and others, be inerested to hear what you might say about it, but even if you don't see it, remember I told you to try.

Debra Winger's last postcard came back "undeliverable," but according to my attorney I'm not supposed to deliver it in person if the Postal Service has a fucking problem with me, according to him I'm supposed to keep it to myself, and I was like, you're the smart guy, why you think I'd want to rock your boat, and then I walked off...
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2397


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #2839 on: December 16, 2007, 02:04:05 PM »

Will check out DTS -- it's always been I'm-on-the-verge-of-renting and so I'm grateful for a push in its direction.

I heard 'Youth Without Youth' was Coppola's dream project, as in he wanted to explore consciousness but had to wait until he could bankroll it himself --- so all those Napa wine drinkers, if they attend, pay twice for this film.
Don't know when it will get to the outback here, but I plan to see it.

Someone told me they thought Depp was too young for Sweeney Todd, but he is actually in his forties now -- he may need a really hard day, though, to etch some real age into that youthfulness.   Anyway, I'm there.  At the film, I mean.

 
Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2840 on: December 16, 2007, 03:42:56 PM »

...I heard 'Youth Without Youth' was Coppola's dream project, as in he wanted to explore consciousness but had to wait until he could bankroll it himself --- so all those Napa wine drinkers, if they attend, pay twice for this film.
Don't know when it will get to the outback here, but I plan to see it.


You're just the person that I wanted to talk with because...well,justbecause.
This film graphically depicts what I mentioned in a post last week(not in this forum, not in this life) I discovered that the reviewers save one or two are non compos mentis on this film that Coppola decided to do from a little known novel by Mircea Eliade, a romantic Romanian "historian of religions" so-called. But, not quite. There's quite a bit more to it. I read most of his work incrementally in that field as it applies to the discipline of psychology; and,anthropology.

It was only natural that Coppola would make this once he discovered the source, after all he also made, Bram Stoker's: Dracula, last time he went to the Carpathian mountains;but, you know me, as I always say "I have had a couple of friends from there...".  He, however, had not come up with a good idea or an urge in ten years, which this movie is rather psychologically about when you run out of time, think new.  These are all buzz words,however. Here's the entire trip:    http://www.sonyclassics.com/youthwithoutyouth/main.html
 
Logged
rmdig
Guest

« Reply #2841 on: December 17, 2007, 09:34:39 AM »

I've recently watched two Claude Chabrol films based on Ruth Rendell novels, The Bridesmaid and The Ceremony, and recommend both, especially The Ceremony.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2842 on: December 17, 2007, 10:53:51 AM »

Rmdig, I don't know why but, when ever I see Isabelle Huppert listed as a cast-lead, I know this film will be extremely troubled as to plot.

As an actor, she has the perfect training for that and I wonder if she hasn't ever done a performance other than or against type.

I also wish "for Christmas", that "they", whoever they are, would come up with a new channel showing Foreign Films that are classics just as much as Turner Classic Movies are of our standards.

In my locale (just as Barton has mentioned in regard to his waiting  until the film arrives) by a quirk of fate, some individual entrepreneur found some really old theatre near the campus of our only barely notable college in the county,  which is considered "a religious college";and though he does try to show everything considered popular art film and foreign film for the sake of the faculty demand, the facility itself is the dingiest, mildewed excuse for a movie house and you feel like you are really going to expose your lungs to a severe allergy reaction if you frequent the place any more that once a year. In recent memory, I doubt that I've gone there in three or four years.

For over a year,I've had the luck of a nearby theater newly built and which is attempting to be all things to all interests, such as old movies; but,not yet foreign films. But having an actual foreign film channel  would be neat, as I lost my film service delivery which I had for the first five years when I had located on a farm. Somehow they were incorporated into a larger corporate group; none of whose customers would have come to my acquaintance, so I decided not to give them automatic access to my credit until I do know something that recommends them.

Still, if you tell me you got these Chabrols from Netflix, I'd consider it.
Logged
peloux
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 56


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2843 on: December 17, 2007, 01:07:34 PM »

I barely got through The Bridesmaid for probably a dumb reason. I couldn't stand the female lead's (can't recall her name) character. I kept wanting the male lead (can't remember his name) to tell her to eff off. She was totally exaxperating with all the nonsense. And I simply couldn't see why the male lead's character acted the way he did at the end.

I have a lot of trouble with (some) French actresses. Why do they irritate me so? I don' know. Isabelle Huppert is tolerable but I don't think she is such a great actress (I liked her in Gabrielle). There is a sort of light and airy way of acting that seems to lack depth. Miou-Miou is like this. I have sworn off anything by Emmanuel Beart until I can get back to a point where I can stand her. Those pouty lips and peering eyes pretty though she is are too much. Everytime i conjure up Sandrine Bonnaire's face, there is this sweet, wholesome smile. That seems to be what she does best. She is great with the sweet, wholesome smile. One of the Cable Channels recently aired a documentary, French Beauty, which helped me a bit. Starting out with Bridget and working through Catherine (still like her), Moreau (love her), and some others I can’t think of right now. There were clips of Moreau in what I take to be a fairly recent interview. I could listen to her talk forever. I wish someone would sit down with her and do a long, long interview. I like Fanny Ardant a lot. She can do things with her face that Isabell can’t touch, IMO. A Foreigh Language Channel would be a dream come true … but it’s not likely to happen. Americans seem to have  an aversion to subtitles.
Logged
rmdig
Guest

« Reply #2844 on: December 17, 2007, 03:53:12 PM »

Quote
Still, if you tell me you got these Chabrols from Netflix, I'd consider it.

Netflix offers both.
Logged
rmdig
Guest

« Reply #2845 on: December 17, 2007, 04:12:08 PM »

peloux --

I don't think you are supposed to like Senta or completely understand why Philippe hooks up with her.  And yet, love does have a way of leading people to do things that they might not otherwise do.  I thought The Bridesmaid was terrific for being unnervingly understated.  I enjoyed watching the story unfold and wondering what exactly Philippe saw in Senta.  Then at the end, I thought, he doesn't really amount to much without her.  It's twisted but true.

I also liked The Ceremony.  Sandrine Bonneur was a revelation to me.  Very cool performance.  I sympathized with her character, although she's obviously a killer.  I think the characters she and Huppert play are totally believable, more so than the characters in The Bridesmaid.  The ending was a shocker but, for all that, understandable.  If I have a complaint it was with the car accident at the very end involving the priest.  That was a bit too coincidental.

Both DVDs include interviews with Chabrol.
Logged
weezo
Poll Manager
Superhero Member
****
Posts: 3431


Resue when he was a cute little kitten


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2846 on: December 17, 2007, 06:09:10 PM »

Peloux,

DirectTV offers some foreign language channels, especially Spanish, and some French (for Quebec). Not sure if there is more there, since hubby is usually adverse to subtitles and he commands the remote.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2847 on: December 17, 2007, 06:23:49 PM »

I got hammered Saturday night and watched "Spartan" again.
Logged
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2848 on: December 17, 2007, 07:49:28 PM »

We have a STARZ/FLIX movie package which is actually pretty crappy (but also one of the cheaper ways to go with digital cable); but the channels feature a fair number of foreign movies.  Like, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoise, 400 Blows -- which I guess any foreign film afficionado might have already seen and possibly memorized. But they also feature more contemporary movies, like Cache and some others I can't recall off the top of my head (like the one with Juliette Binoche as a hairdresser or something stuck in an airport layover situation with Jean Reno, I think it was).  Plus a bunch of the Crouching Tiger type movies as well.

IFC and to a lesser extent Sundance offer more contemporary foreign films.  IFC for a while had a Kurusowa (sp? - it's been a while) festival every Saturday; and I've watched a few French, Italian, and Chinese films on IFC as well.  And Knife in the Water, a Polish flick. 


So jbottle, is that a ritual, or it just happened?
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2849 on: December 17, 2007, 09:12:21 PM »

All right, now that you've mentioned Jean Reno.... Just kidding, as someone always says around here.  But jbot and oilcanboyd, are you listening?  Harrie may refer to it as "more of an emotional crush"...And, I also like that other Jean, Jean Rochefort who plays Antoine and does fabulous Algerian dances,  in Le Mari de la coiffeuse,The Hairdresser's Husband. At least I have a sense of humour.   Rochefort was particularly good with Johnny Holiday, in    The Man on the Train

I'm with Peloux on this one, right from Bardot, DeNeuve(particularly as she became a woman of a certain age(Indochine; Time Regained), and Moreau. Having become used to her as we have, it is startling the first time you see her in her earliest films, she is so suave, so in control, with that petulant mouche that outdoes Bardot. Then you go back and look at Jules et Jim, and admire the femininity. " There were clips of Moreau in what I take to be a fairly recent interview. I could listen to her talk forever. I wish someone would sit down with her and do a long, long interview."  I just mentioned this factor in regard to Kate Hepburn finally giving in to be interviewed by Dick Cavett, when weezo asked about what I think may be a mid-career film but I could not place the scenario that she described as a Christmas feature.

Definitely Moreau should be interviewed for as much as they can get her to handle; but I suspect she has some difficulties with breathing, you can get enthused and want to talk, and do so a mile a minute and then not be able to catch your breath at all. You don't have as much to work with.  And I confess that I prefer her performance for Le Femme Nikita even more than the Anne Bancroft version of Amanda in, Point of No Return. Although I have adored her all of my life.           

Let us not forget how Jeanne Moreau returned to that same authority as she began, when she played Madame de Balzac  opposite Gerard Depardieu.  She was delightful in the days when she gave us the punchline of acting, for   The Summerhouse (which for some strange reason Australians and English call: Clothes in the Wardrobe) It was so satisfying, like the commentary on "staying within bounds throughout the rest of her acting career"  I never laughed so hard in my life. It was as if she had said, "Oh, yeah, well then, how about this!"  It was certainly as amusing as Ruth Gorden's post-coital scenes for: Harold and Maud, with Bud Cort (who must have understudied with Truman Capote).

Like Peloux, Fanny Ardent is perhaps the most accomplished actress,as far as I'm concerned, you have to watch her some time from a camera angle behind her as she looks in a mirror,there is a great deal of sophistication. Start with, Colonel Chabert. Who is of course Gerard Depardieu. But I am equally intrigued by the flirtatious Isabelle Adjani, her wanton abandon whether Victor Hugo's Daughter,Rodin's model,mistress,sculptor; but, the superb epitome of alley catting, sister of brothers is her Queen Margot. 

Who have I left out? Juliette Binoche. From the first moment I saw her,  she was  at the ingenue stage that used to delight me in my mother. In role after role, she display such variety of qualities you do not expect to find side by side in the same woman and probably should win an award for that some day as the ultimate French woman, having all the individual qualities rolled into one.

But then there is that very accomplished, complicated and funny woman from Neuilly, Carole Bouquet.    Enough.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2007, 11:29:36 PM by madupont » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 188 189 [190] 191 192 ... 303
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!