Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 23, 2018, 07:13:31 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 193 194 [195] 196 197 ... 300
  Print  
Author Topic: Movies  (Read 34186 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2910 on: December 20, 2007, 05:33:13 PM »

Maude, I'm not sure of the particular question you were asking, but I didn't see why in 1979 you didn't acknowledge that "Alien" and "Apocalypse Now" were great.

"Nashville" is what, 1975, and when you get into an open-ended listing of '70's films that are great you have to include "The Last Detail," "Shampoo," and "Chinatown," naturally, I mean, I could come up with plenty of films that deserve mention, but if the paramater is the particular year, then, you look into that year and see what happened.  Good call on "Saturday Night Fever," harrie, a totally misunderstood film for the most part and a fantastic and sad melodrama that really caught a place in time with real humanity the way that "Boogie Nights" did with the advantage of being retrospective.  The brilliance of movies like "Saturday Night Fever" or "Shampoo" is that they are sociological and make acute observations about people in nearly real time, with an eye that makes the films not stuck in time but universal as a result.  "Touch of Evil" had that, it seems as "modern" and outrageous while stuck in a particular place that what shines is an intelligence and the confidence that what's true about this story will always be true about people.  "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest" I had the pleasure to catch on cable a few times a couple of months ago and it's absolutely brilliant.  The drama of the physical confinement of the character is transferred to the viewer imperceptibly:  We feel like we will never be able to escape either, I don't know how you do that, and have the courage to shoot the boredom, malaise, without punching in a sort of dynamic between characters like we see today, which is inorganic, OFOTCN develops like a stay in an institution, perfectly, and the hope is glimmering as it should be, the exhileration of a fishing trip, with the knowledge that they will have to return, etc., just perfect.

I love the 1970's and really the period from "Bonnie and Clyde" to "Taxi Driver" as being the most brilliant in American History, no problems at all there, but I like how year by year you get a reflection of the society or of the most imaginative and resourceful people in the movie business at that time, and without question there are some years that are better than any three years put together, strange that.   I do like "Annie Hall" better than "Manhattan," but when I was in high school the crowd I ran with would get together and rent videotapes of what was supposed to be good, like "The Graduate," and "Annie Hall," and we watched a lot of shit, too, but when I saw "Manhattan"'s ability to fold the small seemingly throwaway joke into something more interesting and ambitious, I was generally excited, that films didn't have to be "important," like "Chariots of Fire," for them to be really good, you could make jokes or have a semi-feminist sci-fi horror allegory with a hot chick in a small t-shirt battling what appears to be penismonster with fears of birth and biological horror, etc., all wrapped in an edge of your seat lean and mean horror movie.  It was a fun time to be discovering that movies didn't have to be "Out of Africa," which I never got, or "Top Gun," which of course I liked at the time, I had no idea about the superficiality of studio production during the '80's because I was just a consumer, but I realized later that the lack of substantial films was a blessing in disguise because we would rent anything to avoid a pretty dismal period of filmmaking, all from the comfort of our own homes, where you got to be alone with a film with friends, it was an education I think.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2911 on: December 20, 2007, 09:54:53 PM »

"Walk Hard" gets a pass from "The Onion," but the article fails to mention that ol' John has a pretty good voice, I saw a behind the scenes short doc on the production that showed his "Dylan" with a "The Times, they are Changing," type joke which is a string of perfect non-sequiters...like "The vegetable process and the cucumbers laugh, while the garbage pail squirms and the cat takes a bath...," etc., I don't remember how it went but it was funny and his voice of doing a nasally Dylan joke was perfect.  And the review says that basically O'Reilly carries the film, but fails to mention that he has to carry it by being able to sing, I mean, I think that's his voice on the Dylan one, but I could be wrong.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2912 on: December 20, 2007, 10:57:38 PM »

Plus, it's Jake Kasdan of "The Zero Effect" fame, I thought sheesh, he was going to explode, and he's quietly getting there, so good news.  Ivan Reitman's son was responsible for "Juno," for better or worse, so there's a new breed out there including Sofia, sons and daughters of filmmakers who know what they're doing for the most part.

Oh, and I didn't see why "The Onion"'s worst list was so hard on "Smokin' Aces," they will come to regret it..., sure it doesn't have the resonance of 3KM2G or anything, nor the star power neither, but nervertheless, it was stylish in the way it was presented, and very professional.
Logged
weezo
Poll Manager
Superhero Member
****
Posts: 3431


Resue when he was a cute little kitten


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2913 on: December 20, 2007, 11:20:43 PM »

Just finished watching "Oh Brother Where Art Thou" for perhaps the umpteenth time, and it is a good as watching the first time - actually better - I caught certain scenes that I missed on earlier watchings.

First time I saw the movie, I fell in love with the music. Tonight, as we watched it, we were discussing how it did exemplify the story of "The Odessey", and made special note of the blind seer who foretells the long but ultimately successful journey. Still, you have Holly Hunter waslking away in the last scene insisting the could not remarry without her original ring despite the fact that it was now at the bottom of a huge lake.

Whatever year this movie was made, would be my suggestion for the best year for movies.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2914 on: December 21, 2007, 12:36:43 AM »

Yeah, I don't know why the Coen's would be obsessed with Southern Mythology, as in the Miss. flood, etc., and roll that and Huey Long into an "Odyssey" story, with chain gangs, etc., but there you go, I think it was '01, but you will have to name some other movie, I reckon.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2915 on: December 21, 2007, 12:55:59 AM »

Harrie,my youngest sister has sent me a Nora Ephron book for Christmas.

In which, Nora complains about her "old age". I think that's how we got off on that topic of Nora's films? I mean, deep down.

My sister sends this because she's concerned about her age. I find this amusing as she is fourteen years younger than me.

Jbottle: I think that is essentially why I saw 1979 somewhat differently.
My take on it is that the further we get Ripley away from the Alien, and it is now going on 30 years, the more I like Sigourney Weaver for being able to project subtle stuff from the inside.

Back then, I rejected,"Monsters" as a movie-fad of the space genre, or the sheriff walking up to my door and he too wore a boy scout costume with a  gun on prominent display. I had an iron stove in the country and a house full of hippies who knew where to burn the roaches(for the last ten years). He had an attitude problem you could chalk up to civil disobedience all because of a place called Vietnam; and as you mentioned about Apocalypse Now and the out of place character by Robert Duvall, let's see if I can put this into words from the perspective of this was where we began to say goodbye to Marlon Brando.  See, I have no doubt that the Peace officer at the door had also seen Robert Duvall as Kilgore.  (After awhile, Bertolucci came along and gave Brando a reprieve from turning into Kurtz, at least for awhile.)  Oddly enough, Mel Gibson alienated enough people so that the majority did not visualize that his Apocolypto was the current version,  or commentary on Iraq, of Coppola's Apocalypse Now having been about Vietnam when it was all over.  Alas for us Apocalypto like Iraq is not yet out of the question.

Ps. The subtlety of Duvall's Kilgore was not lost on the intelligence of the foreign service; the inanity of the pretention of wearing a felt cowboy hat where war was being fought by helicopter sent the message to guys who wanted to go into Burma to problem solve but instead were hastened away from the area to spend years on the Korean front having to distinguish who was reading which newspapers, as policy officer in charge of keeping track of opposition parties.Within two years I was hearing their word for it, "cowboys".

"I love the 1970's and really the period from "Bonnie and Clyde" to "Taxi Driver" as being the most brilliant in American History, no problems at all there, but I like how year by year you get a reflection of the society or of the most imaginative and resourceful people in the movie business at that time."

Exactly, whether it was Norman Lear's input on the American homefront via tv; or, Roman Polanski's and Robert Towne's, Chinatown. Working opposite ends to the middle, prejudice as a working-class norm, greed as a monied class always made up of "the state's early settlers". That latter film also gave me a chance to  re-view up close within the confines of Polanski's 1930s some of the aesthetic that I really liked as a child who had no way of knowing it would just all up and disappear. Obviously, it is more embarrassing to say the same about Oscar's wardrobe, in   Schindler's List.
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2015


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #2916 on: December 21, 2007, 11:39:13 AM »

I think the 70s were a golden age in the limited sense that a lot of films were made that influenced filmmaking ever since -- a lot of innovation and originality.

I'm waiting to make my 2007 case until I've seen Atonement, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, Away from Her (which is in my mailbox today, as it happens), There Will Be Blood, and of course.................[drumroll]......




"Balls of Fury," the Chris Walken ping-pong film.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2007, 12:00:54 PM by barton » Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
ponderosa
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 585



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2917 on: December 21, 2007, 11:57:07 AM »

Finally got around to watching "Everything is Illuminated". Very well done.  I hope to read the book soon for further illumination.
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2015


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #2918 on: December 21, 2007, 12:05:33 PM »

The book is far more complex, I've heard.  The film was a simplified version with director Liev going for the most comic and poignant moments. 

Nonsequitur, but....does the actor Pruitt Taylor Vince have his name somehow reversed?  It just seems backwards.  Help me, crackerologists.

Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
Kam
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2698


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #2919 on: December 21, 2007, 04:47:17 PM »

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071221/ap_en_ce/people_sacha_baron_cohen;_ylt=Ar4hBOS6oYbojnw23mkr1jGmG78C
Logged

You know when, like, you're little, your dad, you think he's Superman. Then when you grow up and realize he's just a regular guy who wears a cape.
-Dave Attell
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2920 on: December 21, 2007, 11:24:11 PM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113280/
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2921 on: December 22, 2007, 12:19:05 AM »

Jbottle,

I really think that I saw this on tv. Some of what's there in the description is really familiar and yet I do not recall the film in entirety; just the development of relationships. It seemed that if you had growth in one person through one relationship, that all the other relationships shifted to another level as well.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2922 on: December 22, 2007, 01:30:05 AM »

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?news=people&issueID=505&itemID=10786
 
Sean Penn enters Oscar race
 
"The Screen Actors Guild awards can be an indicator of how the Academy Awards will go - because actors make up the largest voting bloc in the Academy. Last year, for instance, both Helen Mirren and Forest Whitaker won the big acting awards from the Guild and then again at the Oscars.

The SAGs ceremony takes place on Sunday January 27 – sandwiched between the Golden Globes a fortnight earlier and the Oscars four weeks later. If the Hollywood writers' strike is not settled soon, it may be the only one of the three to actually take place.

SAG has reached an agreement with the Writers Guild of America for one of its members to write the script for the televised ceremony. But the Writers Guild rejected a request from Golden Globe organisers to allow striking writers to work on that show. The Oscar organisers have not yet asked for a similar waiver but face the same prospect. If either show attracts protests by striking writers, it is likely stars would stay away rather than cross picket lines."



Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2923 on: December 22, 2007, 01:31:46 AM »

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?news=people&issueID=505&itemID=10784
 
Gibson’s star treatment from cops over rant
 
The censored portion of Gibson's arrest report was eventually leaked to the media. As a result, California lawmakers recently passed 'Mel's Law' which makes the sale of privileged information pertaining to the arrests of high-profile suspects a criminal act.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2389


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2924 on: December 22, 2007, 02:32:10 AM »

Mel's a character, we all have our bad moments, right?  On the other hand, we don't all have the sack to bank a $30M production and talk to the number five distributor about a guerilla marketing campaign in churches and elsewhere to push eh, about $45M apiece into the middle to insure a huge release for "The Passion of The Christ," so despite the fact that he is the intermittent cokehead, alcoholic, and presumed anti-Semite, he also made roughly a quarter of a billion dollars de minimus by daring to go broke, sounds like the gambling quality of a Rupert Murdoch, maybe it's in the Aussie blood, but anyway, anybody that's never used the word "ni**er" come forward and tell us about how great you are, or, just live with and enjoy words and let a life like Mel be reckless, hey he did some coke and he lives in Hollywood where the Jews run the movie business, oh, sorry, I didn't mean to suggest that there are a lot of people of Jewish descent in positions of power in Hollywood, but if you look at the numbers, it's *kinda true*.  Let me let you in on some inside information:  The South Carolina Legislature is about 82% white males, but don't go painting us with a broad stroke and call us a bunch of cracker ass people who hate Hollywood and most metropolitan areas.  Or do, but I use words that taken out of context might seem racist, sexist, anti-personal trainer, homophobic, and everything else.  When white people quit pretending that they don't still use the word "ni**er" when they get angry about a criminal culture that is largely the result of failure all around, we will still be of two or three minds.  Haters, liars, and realists.  I want to make a movie where Wesley Snipes is 007, set in the 1960's, where he is "socially promoted" by having a very high IQ, etc., and to the chagrin of general management types he is an ace shot and really the only person capable to collecting enriched uranium moving through the dark continent.  Will it be funny or crickets?  Depends on what set of eyes you have, but the name of the film is "If You Could, Save Yourself, Bond," and the theme song has already been written, it's a little "ribald," meaning really crude in parts and by Ween, but I always thought it was a song by Ween thinking if we ever made a 007 theme song that was combining Radiohead and Pink Floyd, with Wesley Snipes as the the protagonist, then this is just the weird movie that 2010 is ready for, a steeped in irony ass-kicker that rocks from start to fin, and tells jokes, and let's freedom ring.  It's a love song to an America that exists right below the surface, the same one that will embrace Iran one day, the same one that will, ah, let be get another sasparilla.....

But check out the Ween song and tell me if it doesn't sound like the go for broke Bond theme that is as cool as the McCartney one was or as romantic as the "You're the Best" one was.....I'm really on to something with this I feel, but then, I'm on beer again...
« Last Edit: December 22, 2007, 02:43:17 PM by jbottle » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 193 194 [195] 196 197 ... 300
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!