Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 52806 times)
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #3015 on: January 02, 2008, 01:08:21 PM »

I agree, the title is only there from legal obligation to Matheson.  I haven't read the book (started it some years ago, didn't get into it), but I imagine it plays fast and loose with a lot of the book themes.  Are the monsters really vampires in the book?  In the film, they seem to be cannibalistic humans, rendered bestial and averse to sunlight by a retrovirus engineered to cure cancer.

I'm going to put Omega Man in my netflix queue, just to compare and jog my memory about what goes on in it.


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jbottle
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« Reply #3016 on: January 02, 2008, 02:55:40 PM »

I would've made sure to pack some cheez-its and maybe a six pack of Barge's before going on my walk to save the planet, that way, if you need to sneak into a hole for a snack, no prob.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3017 on: January 02, 2008, 03:04:29 PM »

Actually he did that, except it was a sixer of Zimas.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3018 on: January 02, 2008, 09:04:23 PM »

Oh, If we are going alcohol, I would sneak an 18-pack of Bud Light and a DiGiorno's Supreme thin crust, which I could probably cook on a makeshift brick oven.

Nice product placement, did he pair the Zima with a nice beef jerky?  Doesn't seem complementary does it?  You sir are mistaken, but this is a conversation for the haute cuisine forum anyway.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3019 on: January 02, 2008, 09:10:28 PM »

Nice product placement, did he pair the Zima with a nice beef jerky? 

No, he ended up having to ***SPOILER***use them as grenades, or molotov cocktails or whatever.  Turns out the zombies hate the Zima.  It sort of reminded me about how in "Superman Returns" we just keep waiting for Spacey and Superman to break off a piece of the Krypto, fire it up and watch "Elimidate" on a small TV, but they never do.  Cutting room floor, I guess.




« Last Edit: January 02, 2008, 09:12:52 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3020 on: January 02, 2008, 09:15:07 PM »

What's up with "Walk Hard" out of the top10 in its 2nd week or whatever?  I liked it okay, and it seemed like everyone else liked it a lot.  I can see not being a huge hit or whatever, but to tank like that?  I never saw that coming.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3021 on: January 02, 2008, 11:47:59 PM »

Yeah, it's one thing where a movie that sucks about an uncomfortable subject with actors that people find unsavory at the moment fails because of marketing and average storytelling ("Lions for Lambs"), but quite another when a movie that is funny fails not for lack of dedication on the part of the ad team or the dough the filmmakers were willing to extend, nor the reviews, neither. 

So, yeah, it's a head-scratcher in terms of box-office when you can spend $13M on a bad horror movie idea anyway and somebody shows a little imagination and tries to tell a complicated bad joke you throw a party and nobody came, I guess that's discouraging, but, I hope that everything doesn't end up being YouTube parody that last's 5min. on a terminal ADD, etc., but there is a disconnect from the people that would've watched "Walk the Line" on the big screen wanting to see it parodied, nope, and those who think the MAN IN BLACK is FAIR GAME, I guess, NOPE...but anyway, yeah, I saw WTL on a flight where I was taking Xanax and Scotch, and I thought I would sleep and didn't buy or have headphones, so the thing looked a little like a bad costume drama, so I REALLY GET IT, having only judged the PILLS BY THE NIGHTSTAND and OTHER CHARACTER FLOURISHES, despite the fact that I know the film might've been genuinely "impactful" in real time at the flix.

So, yeah, it's a bad joke at a crowded party that turns out to be off-color so much that you find out that you may not have been invited in the first place...and you don't get the DePalma retreat of "I'm not surprised that people don't want to see a story about American Patriots raping an underage Iraqi girl because of the allegory," even though he didn't say that...

...you feel sorry for "flights of fancy" like the way Kasdan did with "The Zero Effect," which is about what "Walk Hard" had on the BOX OFFICE (pffffft).

I guess NOBODY KNOWS ANYTHING.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3022 on: January 03, 2008, 02:40:17 AM »

What if you threw a party that you made in your imagination and had 200,000 wds. about it and nobody came and somebody got paid @ 34M, uh, whoops, no, I'm with you, I thought the kids would go, but then when I remembered that they weren't born or whatever when BN came out, then yeah, and then rednecks, then yeah, and then football, then yeah, you're basically asking every Will Ferrell fan to go see a movie that doesn't appear to have any "jokes," if you are kinda square or whatever.  It looks "weird," I guess, or, more importantly, a shitty way to blow two hours if you are an enlightened kid, I hope that's it, but it's always a perfect storm of whoops, basically, when it all goes bad.  I hate it in this case the way I "loved," but loved isn't the word, was "intrigued" by the way "Lions for Lambs" fell so hard so fast...if I were to draw a parallel, I guess it would be that we get all the politics we want on cable, and don't make fun of the man in BLACK no matter how bad of a movie "Walk the Line" actually was, lets face it, for an intelligent audience it plays like parody.  And hey, that's alright, if it's a known melodrama with REAL MOMENTS, but it's really not.  "Walk the Line" seemed like the video game version of Johnny Cash's life, and nobody wants to hear that a dramataziton of Johnny Cash's life SUCKED, but it DID, so what.  I guess if you get TOO CLOSE TO THE THING, then, aw, crud, but WTL was too pretty, etc., it really wasn't a GOOD MOVIE, and Reese Witherspoon was average, you could see that she was on a movie set, and that's the joke...I'm sorry to be cynical, and so, by the way, the hard way the money way, is Juddsy Apatow, but it comes with the terrorism.
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madupont
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« Reply #3023 on: January 03, 2008, 03:00:46 AM »

As seen on tv tonight, unseen in 2006.

Any movie that begins with Marcia Gay Harden in a 1960s style blond hairdo has got to be The Hoax. Any film in which Richard Gere begins speaking dialogue in a Woody Allen syncopated nasal semi-falsetto of excitement is going to be  nerve wracking.  Any producer who is able to entice Alfred Molina to participate in this (on the strength of Harden's unusually beautiful acting as a matter of fact over and over again in every role she had played for the last decade or more) has got to be a genius at the selection of material that will astonish.

Then say that it is a true story, based on a man who claims to be writing the true story which turns out to be an unauthorized biography of a recluse billionaire  whom we have just seen played not that long ago by Leonard Di Caprio in another film  which claims to reveal how the reclusive eccentric got that way, and you've taken the bait.  Dealing with what became a hideously difficult political problem to resolve in the 1970s, it is also a very hilariously performed entertainment about the many interconnected ways in which you can ruin your life and still survive to write about it.  If I tell you that a mysterious Julie Delpy figures in from the start as simply the linchpin from which the publishing scandal will unravel, after she has first shown the capacity to be able to wind its thread tight by being nothing other than what she is, would you believe it?

Let's throw in Daniel Okrent, formerly the public's ombudsman at The New York Times, in the role of a publisher.  Let's have Raul Julia's son, as a Manhattan bike messenger.  Tell you that Eli Wallach, a meticulous recorder of the most private business arrangements of the never seen genius whom you constantly see portrayed around you  as the movie picks up speed, is so trustworthy a servant to the man he has worked for that it never occurs to him not to trust anybody who comes along in his gracious old age.
And then show you that Stanley Tucci, who was given equal billing for this endeavor, smolders throughout until his very skin appears smoky and gray, shadowed in his own wrath at not having total control over whether or not he can be taken.

Will you believe that this film has a Swedish director? Later you realize the hectic pace, you have been through, to keep up with following the trail through this film with some measure of understanding, comes only naturally to the man who has been executive producer of the frantic sillyness that has revolved around Gray's Anatomy telling you little known facts of medical pathology that call for radical intervention; but that it is his equal partner, up to the production of this venture, who arrived with the production values .  I was going to say that this appears to be one of the more expensive films made recently but that is due to Bob Yari creating an illusion while Mark Gordon pours on the pace like one too many drinks that leave your head spinning.

In the end, Marcia Gay Harden, who even pulls on a black wig to prove she is every bit as talented a schemer, as ingenious a con-artist as her untruthful and untrustworthy husband is left holding the bag because she always believed in him.  As a writer no less (and a writer who was so busy at the demands of his chosen  work that he would never have time to deceive her). Novel idea; but, in this case, The Hoax is merely falsely biographical, which you knew from the start.


I was trying to see -- Shadow Boxer with Helen Mirren and Cuba Gooding,jr.(that was 2005)
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jbottle
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« Reply #3024 on: January 03, 2008, 03:36:49 AM »

I've seen TTBoy solid and I've seen Nick Hammer step on a line.
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #3025 on: January 03, 2008, 11:17:02 AM »

Just saw "First Snow" a tumbleweed noir (late 06/early 07) with Guy Pearce and some good supporting cast including William Fichtner and J.K. Simmons (who somehows changes his normally penetrating voice for this role -- you'll see what I mean if you watch).  Has a metaphysical element involving foretelling the future and a man's fate, which propels a fairly taut story.  Not quite a John Dahl, but better than an Ollie Stone "U-Turn."

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3026 on: January 03, 2008, 12:09:12 PM »

Just saw "First Snow" a tumbleweed noir (late 06/early 07) with Guy Pearce and some good supporting cast including William Fichtner and J.K. Simmons ...

All 3 of those guys are great.  For proof of Guy Pearce's greatness, look no further than "Ravenous".

Anyways, thanks for the tip - I will qeuuee up "First Snow" and report back as soon as it's done.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3027 on: January 03, 2008, 09:11:35 PM »

I think I had accused PTA of falling into a cocaine celeb problem, but as "The Onion" indicates, he was working on his magnum opus, "Blood," and it seems like happenstance that he came across it, and there are some nice moments in the interview, where he accepts a compliment, and more where you wish the interview had gone on longer, or like, have the question of "Where did PSH tell you he wanted to do with the character that you felt was wrong...," but anyway, he seems to be the heir to the independent voice that Altman built, and I hope that he will continue to battle and fail, battle and fail, realizing that a good film career should be about half failure either on the box office level or artistic level, but hopefully neither with a couple of exceptions, as in the case of Altman, where "O.C. & Stiggs" was a gig he took in utter alcoholic denial, anger, and with the full power of his thorny auteurism intact, and history will redeem that sort of unapolagetic bravado, and I don't think we shall see the like of Altman again, conforming to TV and Corporate indoctrination film standards at the first, finding zero money success while making the second-best noir ("The Long Goodbye") and arguably the best political film of the 1970's ("Nashville") while redefining "ensemble" by introducing overlapping dialogue that is as vexing as walking into a cacophonous room, one of the better westerns of the same era ("McCabe and Mrs. Miller"), I was wondering where PTA disappeared to and I'm glad that he is as invigorated by film singularly, still, and I hope that he will fight the good fight, and not be scared to keep working and making the donkey move even if it's sometimes in an unexpected direction.  He obviously has an extraordinary imagination, so, I want him to think about genre a little more now that he has made an historical adaptation, he probably has the unusual credibility right now to make a noir film, for SALES ostensibly, or a WESTERN, because of NCFOM, the personal John C. Reilly one, the sprawling Cali masterpiece BN, interesting failure/masterpiece "Magnolia," the "romantic comedy" by way of melancholy absurdism with the Sandler one, and now a historical drama with a sort of organic and understated political message.  The world is waiting, and I hope he just keeps punching out a film every 18 mos., because obsession is a worse disease than bad action.
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harrie
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« Reply #3028 on: January 03, 2008, 09:23:02 PM »

Just curious, partly because I finally saw Magnolia all in one shot today -- but in what way is it a failure?  Though I noted and am still mulling over many potentially WTF moments in the flick, which would provide numerous opportunities for failure.

I'm still digesting, figuring out, and deciding what I think about it, so I don't mean to ask in a confrontational way, just curious.  Maybe some of the things I'm thinking about/trying to figure out aren't my fault..."it's not me, it's you!" so to speak.

Also caught most of Notes on a Scandal, but I really disliked the characters, so left it for Magnolia.  With all the big buzz I heard here and there -- but I guess mostly there -- about Notes, it was such a letdown that maybe it made Magnolia seem much better by contrast.
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madupont
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« Reply #3029 on: January 03, 2008, 10:25:56 PM »

Harrie, I had this confused with the Daryl Hannah movie, just because it was named, Magnolia!
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