Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 18, 2018, 06:53:19 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 207 208 [209] 210 211 ... 299
  Print  
Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33336 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3120 on: January 08, 2008, 01:47:25 AM »

No, and he's in perfect tone with the film, and the moment when he tries to kiss Diggler, and Diggler doesn't get angry so much as "hey man..." gets to the root of the lonliness and generosity toward character in the film, Macy depressed and disconnected from his wife, Diggler from his mother, Moore from her son, Rollergirl from her incessant objectification, Reynolds from the respect  he craves and the bitterness at the edges of the denial of his legitimacy as an artist.  It's a symphony of cultural entropy, a love letter to people who got caught trying to make it in an unforgiving, parasitic culture of instant gratification, and where it should be damning it's forgiving, like in the Hoffman/Diggler scene, the comraderie of Diggler/Reilly, the surrogate maternalism of Moore, the quixotic denial of Reynolds, the grim recognition of market economics in the Philip Seymour Hoffman character, the oblivious coke dealer/user Thomas Jane, the failure of Cheadle because of racism and, again, changing, market conditions from niche, read trapped in time, "hi-fi boutique," to corporate retail and the destruction of seemingly reasonable entrepreneurial transition...a film of moments and a cast of pros, what's not to like??  Contrast if you must with something like "54," note clang in nearly every scene, BN being front-loaded with a menagerie of  seemingly-unsympathetic people caught in an era, with rarely a false move, a drama that could've turned melodrama or bland without the singular vision of PTA, proving that tilting at windmills as a filmmaker can ofter yield unexpected success, even as the era the film explores is a microcosm of a particular failure, proving that in-vogue non-linear style storytelling might seem clever at the outset but is ultimately unnecessary even though it would've provided a tool of artistic dispassion, cleverness, and calculation which is often the trademark of young filmmakers with less confidence.  PTA having the courage of his convictions as a storyteller, and about a story, is the most vulernable trick of all, no trick there, and at age 26 or 28 to not avail himself of some cover which easily yielded an inferior and nervy second film, instead of the unlikely confident masterwork of a film virtual neophyte, is the most remarkable feat of all.  He set out to make sure it would be nearly impossible to communicate the drama credibly of the drama with only one arrow in his quiver, and like I was saying, no aesthetic temerity and hit a bullseye that end's up plitting the arrow of  other great less confident films already resting in the center mark.

The most apt comparison might be "Dazed and Confused," another masterpiece of getting the story right if less ambitious thematically and dramatically, but anyway, add D&C to the time capsule of a type of film that doesn't try to be everything to everyone.  "The Last Detail" is ostensibly the story of two lifers taking a good-hearted dim felon to jail, even less interesting than the porn industry or the last day of high school, if not for the care taken to get character right, to indulge in every detail, to make a great movie...

...love BN, and am in wonder of it having gotten made and being great at the same time, every time...
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 01:57:40 AM by jbottle » Logged
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3121 on: January 08, 2008, 11:06:02 AM »

No, and he's in perfect tone with the film, and the moment when he tries to kiss Diggler, and Diggler doesn't get angry so much as "hey man..." gets to the root of the lonliness and generosity toward character in the film, Macy depressed and disconnected from his wife, Diggler from his mother, Moore from her son, Rollergirl from her incessant objectification, Reynolds from the respect  he craves and the bitterness at the edges of the denial of his legitimacy as an artist.  It's a symphony of cultural entropy, a love letter to people who got caught trying to make it in an unforgiving, parasitic culture of instant gratification,

YES! YES! YES!   (I throughly enjoyed your analysis of BN and say "Amen!")
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2003


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3122 on: January 08, 2008, 11:35:53 AM »

Second that.  Beautiful and super-observant take on BN, Jbot.  A film that should be just horrible and yet is a masterpiece.  Now that's film-makin'.

The "Memento" story is true, BTW.  I joined up at the Zoetrope online board for posting short fiction and critiques and such.  It was founded by FFC, under the Zoetrope umbrella, and FFC would troll through looking for talent and ideas.  Melissa Bank, the gal who wrote "Hunting and Fishing for Girls" or whatever it was called, was one of the writers who got her start there.  Also, Roy Kesey, Ken's son.   And, of course, Jonathan Nolan, Chris's brother.   I supplied him both the basic idea of Korsakov's and its dramatic possibilities, and "Memento" as a possible title, because the sufferer would have to supply himself with constant "mementos" of previous portions of his day.  I also wrote a little sketch, in which the Korsakov's patient was a musician, and could only sustain and prolong the moment while he was playing the piano.



   
Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
desdemona222b
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1228


That's What I'm Talking About


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3123 on: January 08, 2008, 03:57:10 PM »

BN is one of my favorite all-time films.  It is so starkly funny and outrageous.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3124 on: January 08, 2008, 08:43:34 PM »

Bart, that's too bad, and I believe you, I'm convinced that people in the bubble of LA-LA, or writers in general mine the internet for new ideas all the time, but of course sharing information that you think would make a good film--I've had an idea for about 12 yrs. now for a competitive hacky-sack movie in the vein of "Side Out," which essentially follows the Tom Cruise/Karate Kid formula elucidated by Ebert where talented but brash young talent (TG, Cocktail, [race movie] et. al.) is guided by a wise mentor (Skerritt, Brown, Duvall) to achieve a level of precision and craft otherwise impossible. 

With the advent of later films from "Dodgeball" to the Farrelly Bowling one to "Balls of Fury," the upcoming "Semi-Pro," I think it would've been a viable sale if not also project, but I didn't stick to my instincts and didn't follow through, I guess what rankles me more is that I didn't at least complete it and try to shop it, and I'm frankly surprised that it hasn't happened already, but really, now, that moment when there were a lot of heads playing hacky-sack in the parking lots of Dead Shows, Dorms, fraternity houses, other areas of welcome dorkfest, but anyway.

I know you're probably more angry at yourself, but you have to let that anger go, you have to look at the man in the mirror like in the Michael Jackson and accept that you own the problem, I've got a permanent sunburn and haven't yet found that psychological aloe formula yet, and I know that the answer isn't in the bottom of this beer can, nor any nerve pills, neither, but I live with it, and, appropos of the occasion, would like to share that "I feel your pain" like Bill Clinton and Dinosaur, Jr.
Logged
oilcanboyd23
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1613



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3125 on: January 09, 2008, 09:25:44 AM »

The closest anyone came to stealing "Who Made Lou?" was "Corky Romano". 
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2003


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3126 on: January 09, 2008, 11:54:29 AM »

Jbot, LOL -- yeah, I could have felt burned or something.  But really, I wasn't in any kind of writer career track then (or now) and was mostly hanging out at the website.  The idea was already out there (there had been a docu in the 90s about a famous British musician who had Korsakov's....) and I just suggested its fertility for the dramatic arts.  So mainly I was just pleased as punch when Memento hit the screen.

Has anyone seen PTA's new one, btw?  I've heard really mixed responses so far re "There Will Be Blood" -- some feel DDL is lurching around eating the scenery and generally going too larger than life, while others pretty much say it's one more PTA triumph.

The unexpected joy for me, so far, lies in Charlie Wilson's War, a darn-near-perfect story about loopy politics, strange bedfellows, and mujahadin underdogs.  Philip Seymour Hoffman justs own his CIA maverick role.

Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3127 on: January 09, 2008, 12:59:54 PM »

Barton
On your recommendation, I'm going. To, Charlie Wilson's War; it should still be there tomorrow.   I am as is oft said nowadays in general, but specifically, "a huge fan" of Philip Seymour Hoffman.
Logged
law120b
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 281


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3128 on: January 09, 2008, 01:58:47 PM »

was it not au courant to be 'a huge fan' of someone's in the 40s through the 90s?

i second bart on the movie and hoffman's excellent performance, though the role i suspect is a lot closer to the person behind the actor than, say, his capote.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3129 on: January 09, 2008, 03:40:48 PM »

Law120b,

They are still saying that on television when a huge fan gets to meet an acting celebrity for an interview promoting a movie."I'm a huge fan of yours...".

If you get a chance, compare the film, Infamous, with Capote, and see what you think of the two actors side by side for the same role. I like PSH in everything he's done but this is one of the rare exceptions where you get a glimpse whereby you can size up two actors and find you can't really make up your mind to come to an ultimatum of a decision. It's a some of both thing.
Logged
oilcanboyd23
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1613



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3130 on: January 09, 2008, 03:43:46 PM »

WALTER

Uhh, sir, I just want to say, uhh, that we're both - on a personal level - really enormous fans. "Branded", especially the early episodes, was truly a source of inspiration...
Logged
ponderosa
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 585



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3131 on: January 09, 2008, 05:29:57 PM »

DUDE

It's a complicated case, Maude. Lotta ins, lotta outs. Fortunately I've been adhering to a pretty strict, uh, drug regimen to keep my mind, you know, limber.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3132 on: January 09, 2008, 06:17:39 PM »

Unsalted almonds and one-half of a kiwi fruit this afternoon, along with light jumping jacks a several somersaults.  Finished with a round of isometrics and a shoulder-roll, deleted erection e-mails and left.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3133 on: January 09, 2008, 06:33:01 PM »

In my queueuque:  "Sunshine," "Bug," "Superbad."

Right now have "Cocaine Cowboys," which I caught on cable in the interim (good '80's Miami blow doc), and the new Dahl one I haven't watched yet and one in rotation.
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3134 on: January 10, 2008, 12:29:56 AM »

Whew, I'm glad that's over with.

Race Is On to Film Bhutto's Life
..."a powerful rival who was already planning a film before Benazir's death - Hollywood actor and director, Robert Redford. No details are yet available about the Redford project, but it is thought Benazir Bhutto’s husband, Asif Ali Zardari, is likely to give his support to a big American production."
http://tinyurl.com/36pmte
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 207 208 [209] 210 211 ... 299
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!