Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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madupont
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« Reply #3240 on: January 19, 2008, 12:24:13 PM »




Have just seen Zwart Boek/Black Book, by Verhoeven. 

I liked "Starship Troopers".  What else did I like - - "Hollow Man", maybe?  Oh, and definitely "Showgirls".

I haven't been able to get myself to check out "Spetters" but it does look interesting.



"Spetters was in 2001 by Bridge Entertainment Given on DVD, With portraits of Of Tongeren and Soutendijk on the veer. The name of Hans of Tongeren was however only in the little one lettertjes called, while the names of Soutendijk, Rutger Hauer and Jeroen Krabbe (that every less important roles played) considerable bigger on the loose cover were portrayed. According to Paul Verhoeven this was an affront for it acteertalent of Hans of Tongeren"

I learned a few more dirty words on that trip, I'm inclined "spetters" is one of them according to Vorhoeven's wife jocularly asking if he was one of them.

He was tackling a problem that American film makers would not by placing it in the 1980s, apparently a Dutchman with an outlook not unlike a few German writers, playwrights,and film-makers. Nederlands is a very open society but there still was the kind of protest that in US was given to Last Temptation of Christ. Could explain why Spielberg bought it up and canned it;
which is why I give you the Bridge info above. 

My Dutch cognizance stops in childhood memory of my Aunt Alice so I could wish, "My banker from Rotterdam was around", but he is not attracted to places like this. They have a very open society, I've kept most of the goodies he linked for a better understanding of a noncensored society that felt the wrath of the Muslim community killing their host-country's homosexuals. God knows what Vorhoeven had in mind nor will I guess publicly whether Speilberg is saving it for future discussion or just removing it

The lead has died, not unlike Renfro but unlike Renfro, maybe he had some bad news, maybe not.  As I said, similar material was taken up by,The Celebration, "a Dogme95 film"(thank you, Barton); but it is one thing to be dramatically cerebral in a Danish way, as I'm sure Barton will discover in The Seventh Seal, when he should go for all the Swedish Bergman's starring Max, and another to put aside a film for private showings at home as a collector's item.

In the old film world that was, there are films popular for personal delectation. Spetters may be one of them. Who knows?
« Last Edit: January 19, 2008, 12:27:06 PM by madupont » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #3241 on: January 19, 2008, 02:03:17 PM »

I'm posting this:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081547/usercomments

for oilcanboyd23

Just to make perfectly clear -- I like Dutch films --I do not think this was considered a money maker from an Industry US point of view because, simple fact, Americans are not Nederlanders (and that was decided back in Reagan America). So I thought I'd take a second run over because my own catalogue from  my much missed HFF speaks mainly of adolescents (but in Holland that is a young adult; and in this specific case working class). How does this compare with what I watched last night:

A Guide to Recognizing your Saints        (?) Simple. The Americans were unemployed -- that is, they were not working much. They did a little dog walking for a gay drug addict and that was about it.


There are further hints in these user commentaries as to how to find the uncut version of the film.

I am merely sorry that I pressed the wrong button/key the night I did a thorough rundown on Bergman when jbottle mentioned it, because then Barton could see how it divides between the predominantly psychological element of Ingmar and those that are predominantly historic films (not without their own psychology). The early reviewers thought his films were what they are because he had a religious slant from his father.  It could have been just a depressing climate which caused many Scandinavians to move to the upper Midwest for more of the same because they acclimated.
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barton
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« Reply #3242 on: January 19, 2008, 04:43:57 PM »

TSS is a beautiful (I love what black-and-white does, intensifying contrasts and giving a strange depth and delineation to actor's faces) dark fantasy in which a medieval knight matches wits with Death, playing a game a chess to postpone his own demise and that of the people in his entourage.  There's a vein of playful wit and whimsy that runs through all the deep ruminations about life's meaning and our ultimate fate, which is maybe why this is one of my favorite Bergmans -- to the characters that feel deeply, life seems tragic; to those that think, it is more comic -- or at least has its moments.  One of the actors that the Knight and Squire meet up with is caught dallying with a blacksmith's wife -- the jealous raging blacksmith threatens to kill him, but the actor responds by a histrionic faking of his own suicide and then sneaks off to hide in a tree.  While he sits there, thinking himself a clever artist, Death sneaks up and fells the tree. 

One of those films that it pays to rewatch at various stages of one's life.  I'd seen it ca. age 20, but hadn't really figured out how to watch Bergman (or subtitled films, generally, probably) and didn't come away with that much.

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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #3243 on: January 19, 2008, 06:26:58 PM »

Perhaps should  go in impending trivia forum: another movie with pretty girl on a horse scene: Hair
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madupont
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« Reply #3244 on: January 21, 2008, 12:17:21 PM »



it's a long-term investment strategy.  you give it to your grandkids and hide it in the basement for 70 years, then they sell it to someone who has no clue it was stolen long after the work itself is almost forgotten.  the buyer is a bona fide purchaser for value, and gets clean title.


MORE,ON THIS TOPIC, I thought that you might find interesting when I ran into it while doing something else and before the crash of Melba, rather than stock market for instance, prevented me from posting this:

"On November 3, 2006, the New York Times reported that Geffen had sold Pollock's 1948 painting No. 5, 1948 from his collection for $140m (£73.35m) to Mexican financier David Martinez. Martinez is the founder of London-based Fintech Advisory Ltd, a financial house that specializes in buying Third World debt. The sale made No. 5, 1948 the most expensive painting ever sold (outstripping the $134m paid in October 2006 for Gustav Klimt's portrait Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I by cosmetics heir Ronald Lauder)."
 
David Geffen, of course, sold much of his collection in an attempt to buy the Los Angeles Times before it became a Republican voice-box. He wished to save it for the people of L.A.(those in the Industry have their own media communications but still...)and this was his own venture and not Dreamworks so did not include Katzenberg or Spielberg.

I got in touch with a friend of mine at the time since I ran into him reading the same financial news when this was happening. His family probably could have helped but they are fundamentally pro-Bush Republican themselves. So I ran it by him again but I bet they keep him on an allowance while he lives in Malibu.

How did this story play out?:
the owners out of Chicago would not take the money unless the radio station that they threw in would be likewise included in the package that Geffen would have to buy.  He is a shrewd guy because when he couldn't cover it for these owners of the McCormick Tribune   establishment , he found an ironic and karmic use for the money from having sold his favorite hobby of a collection of famous paintings.

He threw a fabulous party (also at Malibu) to fund raise for Barack Obama; and when the Clintons threw a tantrum, he said what he thought of her.
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #3245 on: January 21, 2008, 01:49:27 PM »




Dialogue was cheesy and melodramatic, kind of like a made-for-TV movie, but the final act was pretty intense.


Exposes both Brigham Young and Joseph Smith as the true lunatics that they were in reality.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3246 on: January 21, 2008, 03:06:01 PM »

I saw (and liked) "There Will Be Blood" yesterday - if anyone else has seen it, please report!!  If not, please report as soon as you see it.  I have a few questions/comments that can't be written without risk of spoiler-alert.
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harrie
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« Reply #3247 on: January 21, 2008, 10:43:38 PM »

Sorry, I did not see TWBB. 

But last week I watched most of Elizabethtown, which I figured out about a minute in is a Cameron Crowe product.  Still, despite some cringe- and or clangworthy lines, it was a sweet flick and not the worst thing I've seen by a longshot.  **IS THIS A SPOILER? I DUNNO. I enjoyed the whole thing about Orlando Bloom having his suicide continually interrupted to the point where he gets on with his life, because sometimes things happen that way. END SPOILER, IF THAT WAS ONE** On the other hand, I found the use of Kirsten Dunst, though I don't fault her performance as much as the way her character was written, a little heavy-handed and credibility-stretching. I mean, I've never seen a flight attendant spend 10 seconds on a passenger, never mind the amount of time and attention Bloom gets.  There were a bunch of other credibility issues for me; I mean, Dad's dead and Mom (Susan Sarandon) "can't" go to his home in Kentucky, even though she has plenty of time to hound Bloom on the phone about what he must and must not do and get into too-cute predicaments?  Not to mention her monologue scene at the funeral; I get it, I've seen some stuff in real life that isn't that far off the mark from it, but I just didn't like it.  It was just too, too.  On the other hand, Alec Baldwin was his quasi-evil best at the beginning of Elizabethtown, and I really enjoyed every nuance and inflection he put into his (too-short) performance. 

Bottom line, I guess is -- if you have only the TV or silence for your options and Elizabethtown looks like maybe the best thing on (the circumstances under which I came across it), it's not so bad. I don't think I'd go out of my way to watch it again, though.  Or maybe once, just to see if I missed something crucial that makes it a good flick. 

Also saw Millions. Years ago (2004 to be precise), this was one of the big ads that constantly came up on the NYTFF.  Millions and Monica Bellucci's boobs are the only ads I remember from there.  Well, that and the freakishly dressed kid models that came up around Easter.  But I digress.

Millions is a fable of sorts, and I thoroughly enjoyed it, even the part where I got beaten over the head with the moral of the story.  A little English (Irish? I dunno, maybe) kid finds a huge bag of pounds that 1) were part of a train robbery and 2) are going to be destroyed in a few days when England converts to the Euro.  I hate kids, and this was the cutest little kid ever. 

So he's a bit unusual, and is visited by saints, who are actually pretty fun characters; but basically, we get to see the contrast of how the money is handled by the younger brother, who initially found the loot, and his older brother who's a little more, um, practical.  The older brother hires an entourage of sorts who escort him to and around school, while the little brother stuffs money into mailboxes of people he thinks are poor, treats street vendors to lunches, etc.   Meanwhile, someone bad, who was supposed to pick up the money, appears on the scene and is appropriately menacing. 

Part of the ending of Millions was kind of a letdown in that the little bro burns what's left of the money because it has made life unpleasantly complicated, which I thought was a little heavy-handed moralizing.  Then again, the kid's about eight, and things are often black and white at that age, so maybe that action isn't so off-base. The other heavy-handed part of the ending, where his dead mother appears and tells him things will be okay -- I liked.  It was done in a kind of understated way, so for me, anyway, it held water.   On the other hand, I did not hold water and wept like a baby. Okay, not really, but close.

Overall, Millions is done in a comedically understated style, with a running gag or two, so I liked it.  I think I liked it a lot.  It's not a laugh riot, but a nice little flick.  IMO of course.
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madupont
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« Reply #3248 on: January 21, 2008, 11:53:33 PM »

You just reminded me of a small episode when my son was a little boy somewhere between age 5 and 9, and my brother having returned from Europe, yet never once mentioning Presley in Germany, brought not just pocket change with him but a sample of about every kind of coinage and printed bills from various nations in a cluster within close traveling distance from West Germany.

He gave it all to my son, thinking as we all do when giving presents to kids that they will do what we have done and would do. Suffice it to say, my brother was a collector, of everything that interested him; some, was not enough, he had to collect whatever it was. The idea with him was to amass an impressive accumulation for total effect. It has something to do with Taurus rising; it makes them feel comfortable.

My son was not into that. Some little kids are collectors at a certain age but my son has always been interested in money for the sake of money and what it can do. Without having to ask anyone whatsoever, he marched it into the bank on his walk to school one morning, asked to exchange it into American money. And they did it for him! He then walked back across the street to the drug store and stocked up on what kids like to keep in their desks and eat surreptitiously and inobtrusively as possible. He probably gave a great deal of it as hand-outs. That was the one thing that my son and my brother had in common besides me.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3249 on: January 22, 2008, 12:12:11 AM »

The monster with $42, and surprisingly, "Juno," with $10M appears to be the only film that joins the money party at the end of the year, pretty good story.  It's the dough story for sure, and may indicate that the kids don't care about movie type movie all the time, which is encouraging from a market perspective.  Like "Sideways," "Juno" is this year's little engine that could, and you have to prop that, seems like a hard way to get people to sit in a chair, especially when something like "Walk Hard" flops, and "Lions for Lambs" demonstrates that star-power and marketing stlill don't trump everything.  I don't know if "Juno" is a good movie, but it's definitely good for movies.
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madupont
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« Reply #3250 on: January 22, 2008, 12:35:23 AM »

Okay,jbottle, I was just saying to Harrie, around the corner, "Do you, jbottle,recall Erik Dellums playing whatever in The Wire?

I just saw him tonight for the second time in the same role, Bayard Rustin to Jeffrey Wright's Martin Luther King.  Did not remember his roles in, Do the Right Thing.  Or, on  Homicide: Life on the Street ; although viewers,critics, whatever, claim that he was as intense as Andre Breugher amidst that milieu.
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madupont
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« Reply #3251 on: January 22, 2008, 09:52:51 AM »

No Country,' `Blood' Tie for Oscar Lead
By DAVID GERMAIN,AP
Posted: 2008-01-22 09:09:44
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) - "No Country for Old Men" and "There Will Be Blood" led with eight Academy Awards nominations each Tuesday, among them best picture and acting honors for Daniel Day-Lewis and Javier Bardem - but whether any actors would show up was in doubt because of the writers strike.

"No Country for Old Men," a crime saga about a drug deal gone bad, "There Will Be Blood," and a historical epic set in California's oil boom years will compete for best picture against the melancholy romance "Atonement," the pregnancy comedy "Juno" and the legal drama "Michael Clayton."

"Atonement" and "Michael Clayton" trailed with seven nominations each, including best actor for George Clooney in the title role of "Clayton." The lead players in "Atonement," Keira Knightley and James McAvoy, were shut out on nominations, however, with teenager Saoirse Ronin the only performer nominated for that film, for supporting actress.

Past Oscar winner Cate Blanchett had two nominations as best actress for the historical pageant "Elizabeth: The Golden Age," and the Bob Dylan tale "I'm Not There."

The acting categories generally played out as expected - with a few surprises, including best actress nominee Laura Linney for "The Savages" and best-actor nominee Tommy Lee Jones for "In the Valley of Elah." Neither performance had been high on the awards radar so far this Oscar season.

Best actress looks like a two-person duel between Julie Christie, an Oscar winner for "Darling," as a woman succumbing to Alzheimer's in "Away From Her" and Marion Cotillard as singer Edith Piaf in "La Vie En Rose." Both won Golden Globes, Christie for dramatic actress, Cotillard for musical or comedy actress. Yet they face strong competition from Blanchett, Linney and relative newcomer Ellen Page as a whip-smart pregnant teen in "Juno."

Day-Lewis, an Oscar winner for "My Left Foot," grabbed another best-actor nomination as a flamboyant oil baron in "There Will Be Blood," for which he could emerge as the favorite.

Along with Day-Lewis, Clooney and Jones, the other nominees were Johnny Depp, who won the Globe for musical or comedy actor as the vengeful barber in "Sweeney Todd," Viggo Mortensen as a Russian mob member in "Eastern Promises."

With a Golden Globe and universal acclaim for his performance as a relentless killer, Bardem looks like the closest thing to a front-runner this Oscar season, which is unusually wide open for best picture and other top categories.

Bardem is up against Casey Affleck, "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford"; Philip Seymour Hoffman, "Charlie Wilson's War"; Hal Holbrook, "Into the Wild"; Tom Wilkinson, "Michael Clayton."

Joining Blanchett and Ronin in the supporting actress category were Ruby Dee for "American Gangster," Amy Ryan for "Gone Baby Gone" and Tilda Swinton for "Michael Clayton."


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barton
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« Reply #3252 on: January 22, 2008, 11:14:49 AM »

Oilcan, the local cineplex company has yet to bring TWBB to Lincoln, perhaps to allow sufficient screens for 27 Dresses or whatever they feel is lucrative.  I will report back as soon as it reaches stixville. 

For some reason, "Atonement" doesn't interest me -- not sure, perhaps the way it seems (from the trailer and the hype) to carefully depress all the correct prestige movie buttons and generally scream, "Look at me, I'm Oscar material!"  So it's Juno for me this week at the polyplex -- my interest in the little-indie-that-could was enhanced by learning that the screenwriter was working as a stripper in Minnesota, until the money started coming in.  Anyone who can strip naked in Minnesota is someone I'm willing to give a chance.

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jbottle
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« Reply #3253 on: January 22, 2008, 12:55:51 PM »

PTA is nominated for Adapted Screenplay along with the Coens, which would be a nice way to divide the voting assuming they win Best Picture/Director, but I expect a Coen sweep.  I just think it would be cool for PTA to have an Oscar even if it's not for directing this time.  Surprised that Bardem would be nominated as a Supporting Actor, but then, he's an automatic in that slot. 

Oil, how does TWBB rate in comparison to NCFOM, no comparison because they each is good in its own way, or is NCFOM in more rarefied air?  Also, where does NCFOM rate in comparison to the other Coen films, I've seen before where at least 4 Coen films are in your top 10.

I think the "Juno" girl is a likely winner for "actress," we've done the Blanchett thing to death.
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barton
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« Reply #3254 on: January 22, 2008, 01:27:01 PM »

It seems that the western is trying to make a comeback, what with three solid in 2007 -- 3:10, NCfoM, and TWBB.  Two are period pieces and one is contemporary but still would fit into the broader category, methink.

I'm a Superhero!!  (just noticed)  (where are my special powers?)
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